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NEWS
August 27, 2008
The abundance of deer around Baltimore's Loch Raven Reservoir is no mere nuisance. It has damaged the forest, wiping out habitat for other species and threatening the region's drinking water supply. Under those circumstances, limited hunting on the city-owned property is not only a reasonable but also an overdue decision. Authorities in Baltimore and Baltimore County plan to allow seasonal bowhunting on the northern portions of Loch Raven beginning in mid-September and then employ licensed professional deer hunters to conduct a closely supervised and targeted harvest of animals in the southern areas early next year.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
Water quality at Piney Run Lake is rated good to fair, but Carroll County water specialists have detected the presence of an exotic aquatic plant - commonly called hydrilla - that could cause problems if its growth is not controlled and the lake becomes a water source for South Carroll. Recent monitoring showed that hydrilla verticillata, a non-native, fast-growing aquatic plant, has grown as tall as 3 feet and is visible on the surface along the shoreline. "It is important to monitor this species' remarkable growth rate to determine its impact," a water assessment report from the county water resource planning division says.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
From the restored 19th- century truss bridge at the edge of his 200-acre farm, Monroe Duke watches Deer Creek kick up a riffle of white water as it meanders past on its way to the Susquehanna River. Duke's farm is a few miles from the creek's juncture with the Susquehanna south of Darlington. In its nearly 40-mile course across Harford County, Deer Creek waters animals, fields and wells as it winds through parks, forests and farmland. The creek, about 2 feet deep on average and 80 feet wide at most, is home to diverse plants and animals, including rare bog turtles and one of the state's best-known shad runs.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | February 10, 2002
Hot water is turning out to be a complicated issue. Everyone knows hot water is dangerous if it's too hot, but now there is a reason that it's a bad idea to keep it too cool. For years, plumbing codes required hot water to be maintained at 140 degrees or more, and even hotter to promote sanitation for commercial and sterilization applications. In the 1970s, the presumption that hotter was better lost favor because of the hazards presented by very hot water. Thousands of people were being severely burned every year by exposure to water so hot that it could scald in seconds.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1990
WESSELTON, South Africa -- A stream of water washes across the narrow tar road that leads into this black township from the adjacent white town of Ermelo, where wide palm trees with pineapple-shaped trunks line neatly kept streets. A water main has burst or some township residents have ripped open a pipe, causing the little flood across the sun-baked road.Silas Nkonyane, a leader of the local civic association, pronounces the scene a "waste of good water," a commodity that Wesselton residents can't afford to treat casually these days.
NEWS
February 18, 2007
Ample water supply critical in planning The article "Summit Wrestles with Smart Growth vs. Water" (Feb. 4) rightly highlights the critical need for long-term planning to manage water. The summit is a positive step toward solving water issues in Carroll County. Couching the discussion as either Smart Growth or water does a disservice to the critical issues surrounding water supply in Maryland. Current policies do not force growth into rural areas. They do, though, make it essential for communities to determine whether adequate water is available before approving new growth.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 4, 1991
God is on the side of the big bomber squadrons.Our soldiers made their sacrifice for the nation's honor. Now you make it for the economy: Spend, spend, spend.We could invade northern Iraq for the water supply and divert the Tigris and Euphrates to California.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County residents will soon pay more for drinking water and for flushing toilets. The county is proposing to raise water and wastewater rates by about 5 percent when the new fiscal year begins July 1. Water rates will be increased from $2.68 per 1,000 gallons to $2.81 per 1,000 gallons. Wastewater rates will go up from $4.71 per 1,000 gallons to $4.94 per 1,000 gallons. A proposed 15 percent increase in Baltimore City's water rates is only a minor factor in the decision to raise Anne Arundel's rates, according to Matt Diehl, a spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.
NEWS
September 29, 2006
Officials at the Maryland Department of the Environment had little choice but to warn Westminster to stop issuing building permits until the city develops an adequate water supply. In times of drought, Westminster is susceptible to a water shortage, not only because of inadequate resources but also because officials there have permitted so much new development in recent years. By the city's own accounting, about 500 new residential connections are in various stages of approval. That's big growth in a community of 18,000.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | February 24, 2002
A reader in Owings Mills has a 36-year-old American Standard cast-iron boiler that supplies hot water baseboard heating in his rancher. The boiler appears to be set to add water to the system automatically if needed. His question is whether the main water supply to the house could be shut off during a winter vacation without damaging the heating system. Turning the water off won't necessarily cause any problem with the heating system, but it would be more prudent to leave it turned on. The system does not normally lose water while it's operating.
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