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NEWS
August 27, 2008
The abundance of deer around Baltimore's Loch Raven Reservoir is no mere nuisance. It has damaged the forest, wiping out habitat for other species and threatening the region's drinking water supply. Under those circumstances, limited hunting on the city-owned property is not only a reasonable but also an overdue decision. Authorities in Baltimore and Baltimore County plan to allow seasonal bowhunting on the northern portions of Loch Raven beginning in mid-September and then employ licensed professional deer hunters to conduct a closely supervised and targeted harvest of animals in the southern areas early next year.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
Water quality at Piney Run Lake is rated good to fair, but Carroll County water specialists have detected the presence of an exotic aquatic plant - commonly called hydrilla - that could cause problems if its growth is not controlled and the lake becomes a water source for South Carroll. Recent monitoring showed that hydrilla verticillata, a non-native, fast-growing aquatic plant, has grown as tall as 3 feet and is visible on the surface along the shoreline. "It is important to monitor this species' remarkable growth rate to determine its impact," a water assessment report from the county water resource planning division says.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2003
From the restored 19th- century truss bridge at the edge of his 200-acre farm, Monroe Duke watches Deer Creek kick up a riffle of white water as it meanders past on its way to the Susquehanna River. Duke's farm is a few miles from the creek's juncture with the Susquehanna south of Darlington. In its nearly 40-mile course across Harford County, Deer Creek waters animals, fields and wells as it winds through parks, forests and farmland. The creek, about 2 feet deep on average and 80 feet wide at most, is home to diverse plants and animals, including rare bog turtles and one of the state's best-known shad runs.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | February 10, 2002
Hot water is turning out to be a complicated issue. Everyone knows hot water is dangerous if it's too hot, but now there is a reason that it's a bad idea to keep it too cool. For years, plumbing codes required hot water to be maintained at 140 degrees or more, and even hotter to promote sanitation for commercial and sterilization applications. In the 1970s, the presumption that hotter was better lost favor because of the hazards presented by very hot water. Thousands of people were being severely burned every year by exposure to water so hot that it could scald in seconds.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Doctors have ordered analyses of the water zTC supplies at the White House and other presidential and vice presidential residences to see whether they contain chemicals that may have triggered the thyroid disease afflicting both President Bush and his wife, Barbara.Presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said yesterday that the White House had also asked a specialist to review the Bush family's medical history and to check for any link between the first couple's autoimmune ailment, Graves' disease, and another autoimmune disease, lupus, contracted by their dog, Millie.
NEWS
February 18, 2007
Ample water supply critical in planning The article "Summit Wrestles with Smart Growth vs. Water" (Feb. 4) rightly highlights the critical need for long-term planning to manage water. The summit is a positive step toward solving water issues in Carroll County. Couching the discussion as either Smart Growth or water does a disservice to the critical issues surrounding water supply in Maryland. Current policies do not force growth into rural areas. They do, though, make it essential for communities to determine whether adequate water is available before approving new growth.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 4, 1991
God is on the side of the big bomber squadrons.Our soldiers made their sacrifice for the nation's honor. Now you make it for the economy: Spend, spend, spend.We could invade northern Iraq for the water supply and divert the Tigris and Euphrates to California.
NEWS
August 1, 1997
Manchester officials are seeking bids for construction of a well and pumping services to develop a ground water supply on a tract outside town limits.Manchester is working to expand its water supply. The town has phased out two of its three springs, but uses four wells. It is looking to build a fifth well.Officials want to develop a fifth well on the Wayne Thomas property north of town. A study by R. E. Wright and Associates of Frederick predicted the site would be a good producer, said Mayor Elmer C. Lippy.
NEWS
May 5, 2002
Another reservoir would benefit Carroll A day doesn't go by without someone talking about the water supply and the drought conditions in Maryland. I read the April 28 Sun, "Fire officials call for water supply access." I've heard in the past the governor talk at length about the drought conditions in Maryland and Carroll County commissioners discuss the urban sprawl in the South Carroll region. I have one question or has the governor forgotten about Carroll County again? What happened to the proposed reservoir on Gillis Falls Road in South Carroll?
NEWS
August 23, 1998
Anne Arundel County health inspectors closed three food service establishments temporarily and cited another for multiple infractions during inspections between Aug. 1 and Aug. 15.Turners Amoco at 5077 Solomons Island Road in Lothian was partially closed because of unsatisfactory water supply.Orient Express at 5467 Deale-Churchton Road in Churchton also was closed because of unsatisfactory water supply, as was the Topside Inn at 1004 Galesville Road in Galesville.The Dragon Boat at 4147 Mountain Road in Pasadena was cited for not holding food at proper temperatures and for a sewage disposal system that was not functioning properly.
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