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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, Liz F. Kay and Jacques Kelly and Mary Gail Hare, Liz F. Kay and Jacques Kelly,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com, liz.kay@baltsun.com and jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
A water main break in southwest Baltimore County crippled train service along the Northeast corridor for most of Wednesday, and delays will continue into Thursday. Amtrak and MARC train service between Baltimore and Washington were stalled by the pre-dawn water main break in the 5100 block of Washington Blvd. in Halethorpe, affecting dozens of trains and thousands of passengers. Water, mud and tree branches covered the tracks. The major water main break was the second in two days. On Tuesday, a break blocks from the Inner Harbor flooded streets and closed offices and businesses in downtown Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 2002
LAUREL - Amid terrorism fears, the Environmental Protection Agency handed out the first grants yesterday in a $53 million program to help drinking water facilities draft new security plans. But even as the first ceremonial check was delivered - to a suburban Washington utility that serves more than 40 federal facilities as well as a large swath of Maryland - officials were fretting over where they would find the money to implement those anti-terror strategies. About 400 drinking water plants around the country will receive the study grants, which are to assess the vulnerability of the facilities to terrorist attacks and formulate plans to guard against the blocking or poisoning of water supplies going to suburban homes, street hydrants and government facilities.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
Taneytown has decided to look into the costs of fluoridating its water supply after a recent visit from a delegation of Carroll County and state officials and a handful of dentists praising its health benefits. Perhaps more persuasive than health benefits was information about federal and state grants -- available on a first-come, first-served basis -- that can help pay for engineering and startup costs. "Fluoridating the water supply is a major public health initiative," said Lois Bankert, the oral health care program coordinator for the Carroll County Health Department, who led a presentation to the Town Council during a work session last week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
With only a few details to be worked out, the county commissioners have set a date to sign an agreement to help protect the Liberty Reservoir watershed - and, indirectly, augment the water supply for Carroll County residents. The commissioners, apparently within reach of an understanding with Baltimore City officials on conditions within the metropolitan area's Watershed Protection Agreement, have set Feb. 24 for a formal signing of the document. By signing the document, the commissioners would renew a promise originally made by the county in 1984 to safeguard watershed areas from rampant development.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
Harford County Executive James M. Harkins says he might propose a moratorium on new gas stations in all or part of the county until investigators determine the source of a gasoline additive leak near Fallston that has contaminated wells at 84 properties. State environmental officials have said an Exxon station at Routes 152 and 165 is at least partly responsible for a leak of methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE. As a result of the contamination, much of the community in the Upper Crossroads section has turned to bottled water for drinking and cooking.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2002
Reducing water consumption and increasing the city's supply will be the focus of the Westminster Common Council meeting tonight. "We're really reaching a crisis level," said Council President Damian L. Halstad. "It's impossible at this point to be too alarmed. We need to send a message that it's getting bad." The main source of the city's water supply, Raw Reservoir, has dropped to about 25 percent. About this time last year, it was nearly 60 percent full, according to city officials.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
The county's first published tap water analysis of the Freedom District system has pronounced the supply that serves Carroll's most populated area safe and healthy."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
Every time the alarm sounds at the Winfield fire station, the same question nags at Chief Greg Dods. "As soon as you get the call, all that is going through your head is: Where are we going to get water?" Dods said. "Right now, you can go two miles from this station and have no water." Dods and other fire officials are urging the county to adopt tougher regulations that would force developers to provide a permanent source of water for all new subdivisions. The sources could be an underground tank or an easily accessible pond that could be tapped in an emergency.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
The chairman of the Carroll homebuilders association said the industry won't be inconvenienced while Mount Airy puts new development proposals on hold for a few months to study the town's water supply. Richard L. Hull, who works in Mount Airy as owner of Carroll Land Services Inc. and serves as chairman of the county chapter of the Homebuilders Association of Maryland, said he's had no complaints. "The plans that have been previously submitted in the concept phase or beyond they're allowing to move forward," he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
After two decades of careful planning, engineers are finally ready to design and build a 4-foot-diameter pipe to help bring 30 million gallons of water a day from Baltimore City to Howard County -- drought or no drought.If that seems odd, think again, say project engineers and government officials. The final design should be finished by next summer, and construction is expected to begin in January 2001, engineers said.The engineers have worked closely with civic activists in West Baltimore, who were concerned that construction of the huge pipeline would cut a 60-foot swath through the middle of Leakin Park.
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