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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
It has been a hot, dry month of Code Reds and cooling centers - just the weather that M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman loves. The longtime Johns Hopkins University professor is not some sort of glutton for punishment. He just wants Marylanders to think about water - how much we have now and how much we will need later - and he knows the best time to ponder those questions is when the cornfields turn brown and the wells look as if they might run dry. "I'm not in favor of creating a Dante's inferno.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2004
Maryland will have to find another 233 million gallons of water a day to serve a population expected to swell by at least 1 million people over the next 25 years, a new study says. And to do that, the state's environmental agencies will need more money, more staffing and more information to manage the state's water supply, according to the authors. The study, led by longtime Johns Hopkins University professor M. Gordon Wolman, showed that significant population increases, particularly in Southern Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, will severely tax the water supply unless consumers learn to conserve and better manage resources.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 2000
NEW YORK - As the heat was beginning to rise from the pavement late yesterday morning, 115th Street between Lenox and Fifth avenues was as white as snow. Hundreds of people, dressed from head to foot in white cotton dresses, slacks and shirts, were arriving by the bus load and gathering in the center of the avenue for a baptism by fire hose. Each August since 1937, the United House of Prayer, a nondenominational Pentecostal church that claims 3 million congregants in 28 states, has held mass baptisms on 115th Street in East Harlem, using a fire hose to spray hundreds of participants with baptismal waters.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | September 25, 1991
Greener grass, cooler temperatures and crisp autumn air.Surely the city's water shortage must be ancient history.Guess again."The word needs to get out that we're still undergoing a crisis," said William S. Mowell, director of the city Department of Public Works.Months of scant rainfall created drought conditions and severely depleted Westminster's water supply over the summer, prompting the City Council to enact an emergency water-conservation measure Aug. 3.But although the ban remains in effect, city officials are worried that recent rain and cooler temperatures have ledresidents to assume that the drought -- or the water ban -- is athing of the past.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
Water quality at Piney Run Lake is rated good to fair, but Carroll County water specialists have detected the presence of an exotic aquatic plant - commonly called hydrilla - that could cause problems if its growth is not controlled and the lake becomes a water source for South Carroll. Recent monitoring showed that hydrilla verticillata, a non-native, fast-growing aquatic plant, has grown as tall as 3 feet and is visible on the surface along the shoreline. "It is important to monitor this species' remarkable growth rate to determine its impact," a water assessment report from the county water resource planning division says.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2008
Deer Creek will be increasingly stressed by population growth in the next two decades, much of it caused by expansion at Aberdeen Proving Ground because of BRAC, according to a new regional study. The communities that rely on Deer Creek should develop additional water sources, the study by the Susquehanna River Basin Commission said. The Deer Creek watershed, a 171-square-mile area that begins in York County, Pa., and continues through Harford County to the Susquehanna River, includes a 73-mile stream that supplies about 50,000 people with water.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Researchers at the University of Maryland Baltimore County and other institutions have been given $5 million to study how development affects water quality and supply, and how urban landscapes might influence climate. The five-year grant from the National Science Foundation will be shared among 13 scientists, engineers and social scientists at UMBC, the University of Maryland College Park, and seven other institutions and government agencies. Catonsville-based UMBC, which will lead the effort, is to get $1.5 million.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
The chairman of the Carroll homebuilders association said the industry won't be inconvenienced while Mount Airy puts new development proposals on hold for a few months to study the town's water supply. Richard L. Hull, who works in Mount Airy as owner of Carroll Land Services Inc. and serves as chairman of the county chapter of the Homebuilders Association of Maryland, said he has had no complaints. "The plans that have been previously submitted in the concept phase or beyond they're allowing to move forward," he said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2001
The Freedom Comprehensive Plan, a land-use program that will guide growth in South Carroll - the county's most populous area - for the next five years, won unanimous approval from the county commissioners yesterday. Steven C. Horn, county director of planning, reviewed comments from a public hearing last month before the commissioners' vote, the first major revision to the 1977 plan for the area, which has tripled in population in the past 24 years to nearly 30,000. The bulk of residents' concerns were with schools and roads that have not kept pace with development.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, Liz F. Kay and Jacques Kelly and Mary Gail Hare, Liz F. Kay and Jacques Kelly,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com, liz.kay@baltsun.com and jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
A water main break in southwest Baltimore County crippled train service along the Northeast corridor for most of Wednesday, and delays will continue into Thursday. Amtrak and MARC train service between Baltimore and Washington were stalled by the pre-dawn water main break in the 5100 block of Washington Blvd. in Halethorpe, affecting dozens of trains and thousands of passengers. Water, mud and tree branches covered the tracks. The major water main break was the second in two days. On Tuesday, a break blocks from the Inner Harbor flooded streets and closed offices and businesses in downtown Baltimore.
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