Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWater Supply
IN THE NEWS

Water Supply

NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
When firefighters arrived at a fire on Lynch Lane in rural northern Baltimore County last month, they found a house in flames at the end of a long, narrow road. The nearest source of water was three-quarters of a mile away at Little Gunpowder Falls.Unable to get a full-sized engine down the bank to the stream, firefighters sank hoses of three small trucks into the stream and pumped water uphill 400 feet to an engine on Baldwin Mill Road, which pumped it through more hoses and engines in a 4,000-foot lifeline to the house.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
The Maryland Department of the Environment has ruled out two possible sources of bacteria in the Union Bridge water supply, and the agency now plans to check a suspected sinkhole near the well on Locust Street.Treated water from the well is safe to drink, an MDE spokesman said when tests started in September. But the agency wants to know the source of bacteria in the untreated water.Dye tests showed no infiltration from the town's sewer system, which is "very good news," said John W. Grace, an MDE public health engineer.
NEWS
August 3, 1999
THERE'S little chance the current drought will end soon, and a task force formed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening meeting today should not be afraid to impose mandatory water conservation measures.Rather than wait for matters to worsen, public officials should take measures to curb usage and ensure adequate water supplies are available for the people who depend on the Baltimore metropolitan water system.Clearly, this is not a just a hot, dry summer. It has been like a desert in Maryland and around much of the country.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | April 12, 1992
Protect the water supply, build more ball fields, cluster homes and keep the charm, Southwest Carroll residents told a citizens committeeworking on a plan for development in the area.Because area residents have had problems with wells pumping slowly or running dry, manyof those who attended a community meeting Thursday night at South Carroll High said the water supply should dictate where and how development should occur.Paul Baker, a Sams Creek Road resident, said the county should provide another water source before allowing more growth.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1999
The county's first published tap water analysis of the Freedom District system has pronounced the supply that serves Carroll's most populated area safe and healthful."
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
A limited water supply might force a reduction in the size of a proposed development that would be the first major subdivision in Union Bridge -- one that might double the town's population.Hampstead developer Martin K. P. Hill wants to build 317 homes, and permission from the Maryland Department of the Environment to pump enough water to sustain the subdivision from a well at the 120-acre property.Hill was seeking approval for 124,000 gallons a day -- enough for more than 500 homes, based on the state's projection of 230 gallons a day per household.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2007
The water supply in Harford has yet to be affected by the drought as significantly as other jurisdictions in Maryland, but county officials are anxiously watching the at-risk sources and urging residents to take conservation measures. There are no restrictions on water use in Harford, as have been implemented in other areas in the region, but that could change if the dry conditions persist, county officials said. "We are asking people to be mindful of dry conditions and to conserve wherever possible," said Joel Caudill, deputy director of the county's Public Works Department.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2000
The chairman of the Carroll homebuilders association said the industry won't be inconvenienced while Mount Airy puts new development proposals on hold for a few months to study the town's water supply. Richard L. Hull, who works in Mount Airy as owner of Carroll Land Services Inc. and serves as chairman of the county chapter of the Homebuilders Association of Maryland, said he has had no complaints. "The plans that have been previously submitted in the concept phase or beyond they're allowing to move forward," he said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1998
Annexing 157 acres of undeveloped land just a cornfield north of Manchester's town limits is a "win-win-win" situation for the county, developer Martin K. P. Hill and the town, says Mayor Elmer C. Lippy Jr.Lippy made the remarks yesterday after the county commissioners voted 3-0 to sign a joint petition with the developer, his partnerships and property owner James Martin, asking the town to annex a half-dozen parcels. The parcels are being called Black Farm, but three are owned by Hill, Black Farm's owner.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.