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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | February 11, 2001
Over the years, architects and developers have made great strides in converting older industrial buildings on Baltimore's waterfront to distinctive new settings for high-tech businesses. Tenants love the funky old spaces that once served as factories, canning plants and warehouses. Preservationists know how much the renovation of older buildings can help revitalize surrounding neighborhoods. But what happens when developers run out of handsome old buildings to recycle? How do designers and builders replicate the memorable qualities that are unique to older buildings in all-new construction?
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NEWS
By Thomas J. Stosur | July 20, 2010
This month, tens of thousands of Baltimore citizens and visitors helped celebrate the 30th anniversary of Harborplace. Our world-famous waterfront has become a source of pride for residents and a recreational asset that connects people with our industrial heritage, our rich array of city neighborhoods, and of course with the water itself. Baltimore benefits from the harbor's ability to draw regional, national and international tourists, supporting one of the largest sectors of the city's economy.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun Mark Matthews of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | November 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush quieted yesterday congressional complaints about his dramatic buildup of forces in the Persian Gulf by assuring the lawmakers he has not yet decided to launch a military strike on Iraq, but only wants it to appear a "credible option."More than a dozen leaders of both sides of the House and Senate emerged from a two-hour session with Mr. Bush saying they agreed with him that there was no reason at this point for Congress to formally consider the question of whether the United States should go to war."
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | June 25, 2010
Writer Henry James is often quoted as saying the two most beautiful words in the English language are "summer afternoon." Few would disagree. The words unravel visceral recollections of corn on the cob roasting over hot coals or a yellowing meadow on the horizon, haze rising with a din released by thousands of grasshoppers. And if such pleasant memories can be compacted into the shortness of an afternoon, a summer getaway lasting a day, a week or all summer long is better yet. For many, escaping to a second home for weekends or extended retreats is ideal: a beach cottage, mountain cabin, or rural farmette where "real life" concerns turn to just living, to making simple memories we call on again and again.
NEWS
By Daniel Schorr | November 21, 1994
THE OLD adage has it that partisan politics stops at the water's edge, but the water's edge is fast disappearing under the Republican wave.In Jakarta last week, President Clinton reassured Asian leaders that he still has the constitutional responsibility for the conduct of foreign policy.But Mr. Clinton -- pardon the expression -- is whistling Dixie.The Republican majority, starting with Jesse Helms, the next chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is staking out foreign-policy positions that can be disruptive to the administration's plans.
NEWS
September 17, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON should accept that whatever he does or fails to do with respect to Iraq's aggression, leading Republican campaigners will criticize him for doing too much or too little or both. So he might as well try to do the right thing. The trick is to figure out what that is.It is too late to urge that politics stop at the water's edge, a principle handed down from another era. Lip service will not make it work this time anymore than it did when Democrats questioned President Bush's gulf war deployment.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | July 6, 1998
SAG HARBOR, N.Y. -- Watching from afar, it is a thrill to see the president of the United States doing so well in China. Most of us have had our ups and downs with William Jefferson Clinton, but he is "us" -- past the water's edge, one man is America.On a fundamental level, the real job of a president is to bring out the best in the American people -- and, therefore, to show the best of us to the rest of the world. President Clinton did that last week, and it has been fun to watch. For the first time, really, he has been able to display his astonishing political skills in a far place.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | September 3, 1998
Looking for a bud to swim with? How 'bout your dog? But first, find out if he's a water lover. The book "Totally Fun Things to Do With Your Dog" says here's how you can tell:* Fill a large plastic tub with warm water and toss in your pup's fave toy. If Rover goes in after it, he's a water hound. If he just paws at the water, he's thinking about it. If he stalks away, no way are you gonna turn him into a water pup.* If your dog digs the wet stuff, hurray! You can play water games! Here's a "Totally Fun" way to introduce him to water:* Let him sniff the water, wade in it and walk near the water's edge.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
A Memorable Place Weathering the soggy skies of Ireland By Evan L. Balkan SPECIAL TO THE SUN The old saw about Ireland is that it rains incessantly. Unfortunately, on my one trip there, it proved to be accurate. Ireland was country No. 4 on a five-month trip through Europe. Eventually, I would get as far east as the Julian Alps in Slovenia and as far south as the confluence of the Mediterranean and Atlantic on Spain's southern coast. I had crossed into Ireland from Wales. During the next two weeks, I headed north (Dublin and Drogheda)
NEWS
December 14, 1993
Watershed QualityBaltimore Municipal Golf Corp. will soon be presenting the findings of the KCI feasibility study to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke for approval. The 21 additional holes of golf it plans along the water's edge would result in loss of forest buffer and threaten water quality.Recent publications: the November National Geographic, and articles in Audubon, the New York Times, and U.S.A. Today, alert and alarm us concerning threats to and disintegration of our water bodies, particularly our drinking water sources.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
ManTech International Corp., a provider of innovative technologies for the intelligence community, will be the first tenant of a new mid-rise building under construction at the Water's Edge Corporate Campus on the former Bata Shoe Factory property in Harford County. ManTech has signed a 10-year, 63,000-square-foot lease to be the first tenant in a five-story, 125,000-square-foot office building that will open in March 2011 at 4696 Millennium Drive. ManTech's building is the fourth and final mid-rise building at the $75 million Water's Edge campus that Manekin is developing with Alex Brown Realty at the intersection of Routes 40 and 543 in Belcamp.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
An affiliate of the National Aquarium plans to start an environmental cleanup of nearly 13 acres along the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River this fall and open a public park late next year, but has put on hold more elaborate plans to build an animal care facility. The aquarium's Center for Aquatic Life and Conservation Inc. said today it is seeking a contractor to clean up its contaminated waterfront property in South Baltimore, along Baltimore's lesser-known harbor. The two-phase project will create a park with walking trails, some of which will connect to the Gwynns Falls trail, a 100-foot fishing pier and some wooded areas, said Tim Pula, the aquarium's senior director of capital planning.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | July 7, 2009
The push for intense development along the water's edge can be traced largely to the administrations of Kurt L. Schmoke and Martin O'Malley, who recognized the water's ability to draw businesses of all kinds. From the 1960s to the 1990s, the city had strong restrictions on waterfront development. Its master plan called for low- and mid-rise buildings close to the water and taller buildings several blocks inland, a strategy that limited the amount of new construction along the water's edge.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | September 10, 2008
New shops and restaurants would rise along more than a dozen blocks of Baltimore's most heavily traveled downtown boulevard, Pratt Street, and the corridor itself would get a $100 million makeover in one of the city's most ambitious urban renewal initiatives since the redevelopment of Charles Center and the Inner Harbor. Mayor Sheila Dixon is scheduled today to unveil final plans to revitalize a 16-block stretch of Pratt Street during the annual meeting of the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, a civic organization that has led the drive to transform the corridor into a more inviting and pedestrian-friendly gateway to Baltimore's waterfront and business districts.
NEWS
By Jacqueline D'Alessio | August 7, 2008
Dear Machine Man, I'm the woman who lives across the wide creek in Annapolis. You already know who you are. You are the man of all things loud - the Almighty Macho Machine Man. You have never met a two-cycle engine you didn't like. "The more noise, the better" is your motto. You begin your onslaught with a little leaf-blowing at the mind-boggling hour of 7:30 a.m. Not your regular, steady ear-splitting whine, mind you. No. Instead of a constant "WWWWWWWAAAAAAAAA- AAAAAAAA," you choose the much more annoying form of a pulsing on and off: "WWWAAA" ... blessed second of silence ... "WWWAAA" ... and on and on, ad infinitum.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 27, 2008
With cameras rolling and reporters scribbling, Gov. Martin O'Malley got down and dirty with a bunch of his constituents Friday morning. He turned over rocks to see what slithered from the gooey underside and cast a wide net to help them find spineless creatures that hid in the shadows. No, Maryland's chief executive wasn't leading a State House tour. He was standing along the bank of a Patapsco River tributary, emphasizing the importance of enjoying the outdoors and being good stewards of the environment.
TRAVEL
December 3, 2006
I snapped this shot of my 16-year-old daughter, Catherine, while on vacation in Greece in June. The photo was taken around the pool at the Astra Hotel on the Greek island of Santorini. Although the potential drop from the side of the pool looks imposing (given the steepness of the cliffs), the roof of the next building is only about 10 feet below the edge. Tom Kane Timonium
NEWS
April 13, 1994
Some people like what they see; others are vocally critical. External surface panels are being installed at the Inner Harbor site of the $160 million Christopher Columbus Center for Marine Biotechnology. Soon, the Teflon-coated fabric roof will be stretched over the three-level exhibition hall. It should be quite a sight.The rapidly progressing Columbus Center is the most visible activity transforming the Inner Harbor and pushing it eastward. It is not the only one.Without any fanfare, multi-million-dollar infrastructure work at Inner Harbor East has given that 20-acre waterfront parcel south of Little Italy a street grid and old-fashioned lamp posts.
TRAVEL
December 3, 2006
I snapped this shot of my 16-year-old daughter, Catherine, while on vacation in Greece in June. The photo was taken around the pool at the Astra Hotel on the Greek island of Santorini. Although the potential drop from the side of the pool looks imposing (given the steepness of the cliffs), the roof of the next building is only about 10 feet below the edge. Tom Kane Timonium
NEWS
By Klaus Philipsen | September 29, 2006
Jane Jacobs, author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, spent decades dispelling the notion that cities should be designed around cars; instead, she promoted the city as a people place. Baltimore still needs to catch on. A few years ago, the quasi-public Baltimore Development Corp. (BDC) was given the task of fixing what had been identified as downtown Baltimore's biggest woe: the "parking gap." It attacked this problem with single-minded zeal. Since then, in the downtown area, parking spaces have been sprouting far more frequently than coffee shops - tens of thousands of them.
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