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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the latest state vs. state battle over water rights to reach the Supreme Court, the justices agreed yesterday to decide whether Virginia needs Maryland's permission to draw water from the Potomac River, which forms part of the boundary between the two. A special master appointed by the court more than two years ago to resolve this chapter of a dispute that dates from the 18th century supported Virginia in a report to the justices late...
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NEWS
November 27, 2012
While reading G. Jefferson Price's column ("For Israel, it's different this time," Nov. 20), I was reminded of the quip "learned nothing, forgot nothing" describing a reactionary French royal family. Mr. Price displays the same distorted views toward Israel he showed 35 years ago when he was The Sun's Middle East correspondent, intervening events not budging his attitudes. According to Mr. Price, Israel "acts with impunity" against Palestinian Arabs and Lebanon. Unmentioned are thousands of Israeli casualties, two Arab uprisings, withdrawals from Gaza, Lebanon and major portions of the West Bank.
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NEWS
June 29, 1998
THE WATERS of the Susquehanna River are the lifeblood of the Chesapeake Bay. They nurture the watershed above the estuary in Pennsylvania and New York. They are not the property of one state or area.To regulate use of this water, the Susquehanna River Basin Compact was created by federal law in 1970, with a commission to administer the tristate agreement.Baltimore and the commission are locked in a dispute over water rights unresolved after five years of negotiations.Baltimore claims virtually unrestricted draw on water from the Susquehanna at the pool just above Conowingo Dam.It backs its claim with a 73-year-old agreement with the dam's power company owner, a 1967 amendment tacked on to the proposed compact by the General Assembly and a 1984 order of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 28, 2011
I am pleased to report the sighting of an artifact so rarely seen among Democrats that it has become the stuff of legend and conjecture, like Bigfoot or theLoch Ness monster. It is called a spine. Said spine was briefly glimpsed a little over a week ago at a "jobs summit" in Inglewood, Calif., in the person of Rep. Maxine Waters. "I'm not afraid of anybody," the California Democrat said. "... And as far as I'm concerned, the 'tea party' can go straight to hell. " Her words left the Tea Party Patriots sputtering about the need to play nice.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
Hampstead Town Manager John A. Riley has expressed concern to the Maryland Water Resources Administration over Black & Decker's application for a permit to pump an average of 432,000 gallons of ground water per day from 10 wells on the plant's Hampstead site."
NEWS
November 27, 2012
While reading G. Jefferson Price's column ("For Israel, it's different this time," Nov. 20), I was reminded of the quip "learned nothing, forgot nothing" describing a reactionary French royal family. Mr. Price displays the same distorted views toward Israel he showed 35 years ago when he was The Sun's Middle East correspondent, intervening events not budging his attitudes. According to Mr. Price, Israel "acts with impunity" against Palestinian Arabs and Lebanon. Unmentioned are thousands of Israeli casualties, two Arab uprisings, withdrawals from Gaza, Lebanon and major portions of the West Bank.
NEWS
December 25, 2000
GEORGE WASHINGTON was a poacher, taking fish from Maryland waters to sell at his Mount Vernon home. And that led to the historic Potomac Compact of 1785, which allowed fishing and navigation rights for citizens of both states. Intermittent legal battles over two centuries led Virginia to return to the U.S. Supreme Court in the current dispute over water rights. Now there's a fight over these same matters in Baltimore Circuit Court, pitting the state of Maryland against ... the state of Maryland.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2003
SAN MARCOS, Texas - The reeds swayed in the cool current of the San Marcos River, beckoning Dianne Wassenich like 1,000 slender fingers. She was in her swimsuit, and an inner tube was on the porch, ready to take her on another lazy trip down the river. But there was work to do. The director of an environmental group, Wassenich was busy folding hundreds of newsletters that contained the usual warnings of impending doom when the idea came to her - an idea that two years later has placed her tiny nonprofit at the center of a dispute over the water rights, and the future, of the West.
NEWS
By PETER HONEY | March 31, 1991
Washington.--It has brought Syria, Iraq and Turkey to the brink of armed conflict. Historians have found it in the roots of Israel's six-day war with the Arabs. Jordan's King Hussein said last July that it alone could drive him back to war. And Iraqi President Saddam Hussein tried unsuccessfully to use it as a weapon in the Persian Gulf war.The focus, for once, is not on oil or boundary lines or political rights or tribal rivalry or religious persecution, but on one of the most fundamental of human needs -- water.
NEWS
September 23, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The city can plan to meet future water needs as the result of an agreement with the county, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown said Thursday.In 1978, Genstar Stone Products Co., which has quarries off Route 31, agreed to give the county water it generates through the mining process but does not need. Last week, the county agreed to give Westminster rights to the water."This allows the city to deal with our water needs into the next century," Councilman Mark S. Snyder said.Brown said the city will not begin using water from the quarries right away.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2003
SAN MARCOS, Texas - The reeds swayed in the cool current of the San Marcos River, beckoning Dianne Wassenich like 1,000 slender fingers. She was in her swimsuit, and an inner tube was on the porch, ready to take her on another lazy trip down the river. But there was work to do. The director of an environmental group, Wassenich was busy folding hundreds of newsletters that contained the usual warnings of impending doom when the idea came to her - an idea that two years later has placed her tiny nonprofit at the center of a dispute over the water rights, and the future, of the West.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
GREAT FALLS, Va. - Somewhere beneath the coffee-colored surface of the Potomac River, which marks the border between Maryland and her sister state to the south, sits a 725-foot-long, 10-foot-wide pipe that could start drawing water this summer for as many as 1.2 million Virginians. The intake pipe - which is under testing and will be operational this summer - can't be seen from the shore, but its construction has hardly been a secret. Plans to build the $10 million pipe reignited a centuries-old dispute over which state has sovereignty over the Potomac River and inspired a legal case known as Virginia vs. Maryland that will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the latest state vs. state battle over water rights to reach the Supreme Court, the justices agreed yesterday to decide whether Virginia needs Maryland's permission to draw water from the Potomac River, which forms part of the boundary between the two. A special master appointed by the court more than two years ago to resolve this chapter of a dispute that dates from the 18th century supported Virginia in a report to the justices late...
NEWS
July 14, 2001
OUT West there's a new war over water - and fish and farms. And the Endangered Species Act is again the target of local economic interests in the land of the spotted owl. Farmers in the Klamath Basin were cut off from vital irrigation water by federal officials trying to save fish species on the brink of extinction. In this extremely dry summer, some 1,400 farms on the Oregon-California border that have relied on the irrigation project for nearly a century have seen their fertile fields turn a dusty brown.
NEWS
December 25, 2000
GEORGE WASHINGTON was a poacher, taking fish from Maryland waters to sell at his Mount Vernon home. And that led to the historic Potomac Compact of 1785, which allowed fishing and navigation rights for citizens of both states. Intermittent legal battles over two centuries led Virginia to return to the U.S. Supreme Court in the current dispute over water rights. Now there's a fight over these same matters in Baltimore Circuit Court, pitting the state of Maryland against ... the state of Maryland.
NEWS
June 29, 1998
THE WATERS of the Susquehanna River are the lifeblood of the Chesapeake Bay. They nurture the watershed above the estuary in Pennsylvania and New York. They are not the property of one state or area.To regulate use of this water, the Susquehanna River Basin Compact was created by federal law in 1970, with a commission to administer the tristate agreement.Baltimore and the commission are locked in a dispute over water rights unresolved after five years of negotiations.Baltimore claims virtually unrestricted draw on water from the Susquehanna at the pool just above Conowingo Dam.It backs its claim with a 73-year-old agreement with the dam's power company owner, a 1967 amendment tacked on to the proposed compact by the General Assembly and a 1984 order of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
GREAT FALLS, Va. - Somewhere beneath the coffee-colored surface of the Potomac River, which marks the border between Maryland and her sister state to the south, sits a 725-foot-long, 10-foot-wide pipe that could start drawing water this summer for as many as 1.2 million Virginians. The intake pipe - which is under testing and will be operational this summer - can't be seen from the shore, but its construction has hardly been a secret. Plans to build the $10 million pipe reignited a centuries-old dispute over which state has sovereignty over the Potomac River and inspired a legal case known as Virginia vs. Maryland that will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
July 14, 2001
OUT West there's a new war over water - and fish and farms. And the Endangered Species Act is again the target of local economic interests in the land of the spotted owl. Farmers in the Klamath Basin were cut off from vital irrigation water by federal officials trying to save fish species on the brink of extinction. In this extremely dry summer, some 1,400 farms on the Oregon-California border that have relied on the irrigation project for nearly a century have seen their fertile fields turn a dusty brown.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
Hampstead Town Manager John A. Riley has expressed concern to the Maryland Water Resources Administration over Black & Decker's application for a permit to pump an average of 432,000 gallons of ground water per day from 10 wells on the plant's Hampstead site."
NEWS
By PETER HONEY | March 31, 1991
Washington.--It has brought Syria, Iraq and Turkey to the brink of armed conflict. Historians have found it in the roots of Israel's six-day war with the Arabs. Jordan's King Hussein said last July that it alone could drive him back to war. And Iraqi President Saddam Hussein tried unsuccessfully to use it as a weapon in the Persian Gulf war.The focus, for once, is not on oil or boundary lines or political rights or tribal rivalry or religious persecution, but on one of the most fundamental of human needs -- water.
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