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Water Restrictions

NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Water pressure in Taneytown bounced up to near normal almost immediately after the mayor imposed mandatory restrictions on most outdoor uses last Thursday, officials said yesterday. The restrictions were tightened Tuesday evening by Mayor W. Robert Flickinger, who changed the penalty for violating the restrictions that ban outdoor uses such as filling pools, washing cars and watering lawns. His new order eliminates a grace period that officials feared might increase water use. His original order provided for only warnings until Monday but now allows fines after one warning.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
For Maryland residents, these could be the final days of watering at will.With the state in the throes of its worst drought in 70 years and the governor likely to announce mandatory water restrictions this week, people spent the weekend washing their cars and giving their yards what could be the Last Big Soak.Teaka and Dale Brown of Brooklyn Park have contingencies that combine the offerings of Mother Nature with the best elements of survivalist training.Plan A: As many as 30 five-gallon buckets will line their walkway to catch rainwater.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Jennifer Sullivan and Candus Thomson and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
What's cooking? You are.The great July bake-off ended yesterday at 99 degrees at BWI -- 14 degrees higher than when the month began. In between were 21 days when temperatures were over 90.The month had only one record-breaking day -- 102 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on July 5 -- but July set a record for the number of days exceeding 90.Relief should arrive this afternoon, as a cold front sweeps down from the upper Midwest. Tomorrow through Thursday look even better, with highs in the 80s instead of the 90s, said John Margraf, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Anne Arundel County officials announced yesterday mandatory water restrictions, effective Friday, for 30,000 residents in the northeastern portion of the county in an effort to ease peak demand and maintain water pressure to extinguish summer brush fires. The announcement follows a warning issued last week that a break in a Baltimore City water main that provides 10 million gallons of water a day to county residents might not be fixed before the end of the year. County Executive Janet S. Owens ordered residents and business owners in Pasadena, Glen Burnie and the Marley Neck area - including ZIP codes 21226, 21122 and 21060 - to conserve water from 5 p.m. to midnight Monday through Thursday and from 5 p.m. Friday to midnight Sunday, holidays included.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
Talk about spring cleaning. Your cluttered basement and spotty windows are child's play compared to what Maryland Transportation Authority workers are tackling this month: They're scrubbing the 9 miles of tunnels that run under the Baltimore Harbor, from top to bottom and side to side. The Fort McHenry and Harbor tunnels are filthy. They have not been cleaned since August, when drought restrictions took effect. Since then, car exhaust, diesel smoke and road grime have turned the white tile walls a dingy brown and dimmed the bright ceiling lights.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 15, 2002
At a time when several of Hampstead's 14 public wells show signs of fatigue and with statewide water restrictions imminent, the town joined five Carroll municipalities in imposing water restrictions. The restrictions, unanimously approved by the Town Council this week, prohibit outdoor water use, including watering lawns, filling swimming pools and washing cars. Residents may use hand-held containers to water plants and shrubs. The council authorized a $100 fine per violation, but plans to introduce emergency legislation next month to provide further legal definition of the restrictions and enforcement.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
Anne Arundel County officials, saying that too many residents in the northern and western parts of the county are ignoring water restrictions despite a severe shortage, said they plan to crack down on violators if there isn't more compliance. In a news conference yesterday in Annapolis, County Executive Janet S. Owens said many residents are not heeding those restrictions and implored them to take measures seriously. Ronald E. Bowen, the director of the county's Public Works Department, agreed: "We don't believe our customers are complying with the weather restrictions as well as we need them to do."
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Declaring that water levels have returned to normal, Anne Arundel County officials lifted yesterday an outdoor ban on public water usage in the western and northern sections of the county. Although the ban is lifted, communities from Maryland City to Brooklyn Park remain under mandatory water restrictions until Oct. 1. Voluntary limits on public water usage for the Marley Neck Peninsula, excluding Gibson Island, also are in effect during the same period. County officials asked that residents in affected areas remain diligent in complying with the restrictions so there is an adequate water supply for customers and fire protection.
NEWS
June 4, 2006
ISSUE: Anne Arundel County officials announced Thursday that they had temporarily banned all outdoor water usage along the far western and northern tiers of the county, a further tightening of restrictions that went into effect May 3. The ban on outdoor water use from Maryland City to Brooklyn Park could last a week, said officials, who expressed hope that renewed conservation efforts would restore water pressure to normal levels and allow for a...
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