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NEWS
May 2, 2012
A public meeting will be held to discuss a petition to modify the western portion of Church Lane in White Hall from a dirt road to a tar and chip surface. The meeting, sponsored by the Harford County Department of Public Works, Division of Highways and Water Resources, will be on May 16 at 6 p.m. in the offices of the Department of Public Works on the third floor of 212 S. Bond St. in Bel Air. To request disability-related accommodations, contact Shirley DeVaughn at 410-638-3548 (TTY users call Maryland Relay)
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NEWS
September 30, 2013
As highlighted in "A Victory for the Chesapeake" (Sept. 19), Pennsylvania Judge Sylvia Rambo recently issued a thoughtful ruling in defense of the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to enforce the Clean Water Act. After a challenge by the Farm Bureau and others, the federal court affirmed that the EPA has the authority to issue pollution limits based on sound science and can continue doing its job of protecting the environment. This is good news for those of us who enjoy clean water for recreational purposes, but even more importantly, this is great news for those of us who depend on our water resources for food and commodities.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 23, 2008
John Thornton Starr Sr., a retired engineer and widely published freelance writer, died Tuesday of cancer at an assisted living facility in West Bath, Maine. The longtime Govans resident was 98. Mr. Starr was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2000 block of E. Chase St. He was a 1927 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1938. He studied under Dr. Abel Wolman at Hopkins, who was then the world's foremost expert on water purification, while earning a master's degree in water resources.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
A public meeting will be held to discuss a petition to modify the western portion of Church Lane in White Hall from a dirt road to a tar and chip surface. The meeting, sponsored by the Harford County Department of Public Works, Division of Highways and Water Resources, will be on May 16 at 6 p.m. in the offices of the Department of Public Works on the third floor of 212 S. Bond St. in Bel Air. To request disability-related accommodations, contact Shirley DeVaughn at 410-638-3548 (TTY users call Maryland Relay)
NEWS
July 25, 2000
Ahmad Shamlou, 75, one of Iran's finest poets, who fell foul of the shah and grew disillusioned with the Islamic Revolution which overthrew him, died yesterday in Tehran after a long battle with diabetes. A major force in the secular intellectual movement opposed to the shah before the 1979 revolution, Mr. Shamlou developed a free-flowing poetic style at odds with the tightly-balanced rhymes of classical Persian poetry. His books were banned for long periods before and after the 1979 revolution, although since the early 1990s his poems have appeared in literary magazines.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2002
In a deal that reduces its legal, regulatory and fuel cost risks, Constellation Energy Group Inc. has reached a new long-term agreement to sell all the electricity produced at its unfinished High Desert Power Project to the California Department of Water Resources. The California agency will pay Constellation's Power Source unit $12.1 million per month for almost eight years, or $1.1 billion. A comprehensive settlement reached late Monday also releases Constellation from a complaint the state filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in February against companies with long-term power contracts with the California Department of Water Resources.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | July 31, 1991
By today, the county was expected to have one of the most comprehensive water protection ordinances in the country.But after more than 10 years of research, more than $500,000 in spending, and accoladesfrom state, regional and national water and environmental experts, the county admitted yesterday that such an ordinance -- one that wouldguide growth to protect drinking water resources -- is still severalmonths down the road.The admission came just as a $41,000, 12-month study on the compatibility of the county's Master Plan and its water resource management standards was presented to the commissioners.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Brenda J. Buote and Mary Gail Hare and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
Carroll County commissioners will meet this week with Maryland Department of the Environment officials to determine what - if anything - they can do to reverse the state's denial of a construction permit for a $14 million water treatment plant at Piney Run Lake in Sykesville. "I don't consider this an absolute, permanent denial," Commissioner Donald I. Dell said of the state's decision last week on the permit. For more than a year, Dell and Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier have been pushing for the plant, which could double the water supply in densely populated South Carroll, where water shortages have occurred for three of the past four summers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2000
Residents of Finksburg, a gateway community to Carroll County that lies entirely within the Liberty Reservoir watershed, will focus on water protection issues tonight during a panel discussion with several experts in the field. An environmental administrator from Baltimore County, a former Carroll County employee and a representative from the Baltimore Metropolitan Council will address Finksburg Planning Area Council at 7 p.m. The group will discuss regional concerns about Carroll's refusal to endorse the longstanding Watershed Protection Agreement with the city and the metropolitan counties, and a scrubbed county water resources ordinance.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Despite buckets of rain that have drenched Maryland in recent weeks, Brenda DeLalla, a resident of south Anne Arundel County, is worried about running out of water. Around her Turkey Point Island neighborhood, residents are digging deeper to tap an aquifer - a large underground source of water - that state officials say is maxed out in some areas. As she runs down the names of friends and neighbors who have paid thousands of dollars to dig deeper wells, DeLalla grouses about a lack of government oversight regarding water resources, something she and other south county residents have tried to rectify without much luck.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
Editor: I thank The Aegis and Allan Vought for today's (5/18/11) article, "Susquehanna called the most endangered river. " After reading the American River's reasons for this ranking and Susquehanna River Basin Commission response, my question for Mr. Swartz, Executive Director of SRBC, is, "What action will the Commission take to address the impact of hydraulic fracturing on the Susquehanna River?" Mr. Swartz reports that the Commission does not have the legal power to impose a moratorium.
NEWS
August 9, 2008
State report warns of water shortages Maryland's investment in water resources is "inadequate" to address future shortages that could eventually threaten public health if projected population growth occurs, according to a report that an advisory panel delivered yesterday to Gov. Martin O'Malley. The committee suggested increasing state spending by $72 million over the next eight years to finance several steps to begin addressing future water issues. The money would provide for additional staff at the Maryland Department of the Environment, enhance the agency's permit enforcement, create a statewide water monitoring network and provide incentives for conservation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 2, 2008
Consolidating Harford County's multiple water resources into one jointly owned and operated system could save money, increase the supply and help ensure that growth is directed to areas with public utilities, said County Executive David R. Craig. County and municipal officials are considering pooling their water resources and will meet March 10 to explore the possibility of creating a regional water authority. If the proposal, floated by Craig in a recent speech to the Chamber of Commerce, moves forward, it must win approval of the county's three municipalities, which each rely on their systems.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 23, 2008
John Thornton Starr Sr., a retired engineer and widely published freelance writer, died Tuesday of cancer at an assisted living facility in West Bath, Maine. The longtime Govans resident was 98. Mr. Starr was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2000 block of E. Chase St. He was a 1927 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1938. He studied under Dr. Abel Wolman at Hopkins, who was then the world's foremost expert on water purification, while earning a master's degree in water resources.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
The Maryland Department of the Environment is planning to use Mount Airy for a pilot study to see if its water-saving efforts this summer can be adopted throughout the state, according to John Grace, an MDE water supply division chief. "They've made great strides," Grace said of Mount Airy. Since Mount Airy enacted a mandatory outdoor water ban and distributed free reduced-flow fixtures and discounted rain barrels this summer, daily water use has dropped more than 100,000 gallons below the 855,000 gallons per day that the state currently permits, Mayor Frank M. Johnson said.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
Slump in home sales may be boon for bay Call me a contrarian, but two articles in Thursday's paper, "Dry spell means dry wells" (Aug. 16) and "Home sales slump in Md." (Aug. 16) convinced me that a slowdown in the housing market may not be such a terrible situation. In fact, it may be a good thing in the long run if housing becomes less readily available. Maryland is being overrun by the construction of strip malls and housing tracts and this cannot be good for the Chesapeake Bay watershed or, as the article on wells drying up indicates, for our water resources.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Despite buckets of rain that have drenched Maryland in recent weeks, Brenda DeLalla, a resident of south Anne Arundel County, is worried about running out of water. Around her Turkey Point Island neighborhood, residents are digging deeper to tap an aquifer - a large underground source of water - that state officials say is maxed out in some areas. As she runs down the names of friends and neighbors who have paid thousands of dollars to dig deeper wells, DeLalla grouses about a lack of government oversight regarding water resources, something she and other south county residents have tried to rectify without much luck.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
Editor: I thank The Aegis and Allan Vought for today's (5/18/11) article, "Susquehanna called the most endangered river. " After reading the American River's reasons for this ranking and Susquehanna River Basin Commission response, my question for Mr. Swartz, Executive Director of SRBC, is, "What action will the Commission take to address the impact of hydraulic fracturing on the Susquehanna River?" Mr. Swartz reports that the Commission does not have the legal power to impose a moratorium.
NEWS
April 15, 2007
The anticipated arrival of perhaps tens of thousands of workers in Maryland as part of the U.S. military's base realignment and closure plan may severely test the state's commitment to protect increasingly scarce water supplies. At issue, particularly in Harford and Cecil counties, where much of the growth is expected, are the availability of drinking water and the capacity for treating wastewater and sewage while meeting strict new pollution limits intended to reverse the degradation of the Chesapeake Bay. What's required to meet this challenge is a highly coordinated, cooperative campaign involving state, county and municipal governments to plan, share resources, protect rural areas and produce innovative tactics for conservation and water reuse.
NEWS
February 15, 2006
The chairman of Maryland's water advisory committee says people often don't understand why he jokes about praying for drought. They don't see that M. Gorman "Reds" Wolman, a geography professor at the John Hopkins University, is just grasping for a way to warn them that drinking water is an increasingly unreliable resource even in this coastal playground. Eighteen months after Mr. Wolman's committee recommended sweeping changes in the management of water resources and tougher enforcement of existing protections, land developers are still driving the process, charming or bullying county and municipal officials into approving projects with little or no thought to what their impact on the water supply might be. As if building a wider pipe or digging a deeper well were all there is to it. The latest irresponsible example came last week when the Mount Airy Town Council agreed to add 275 homes to that tiny community already under state development curbs because of wells running dry. Town leaders seek to circumvent the state ban by having the developer tap into a none-too-clean section of the Patapsco River.
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