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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Outdoor signs depicting water dripping from a faucet to a glass will be popping up around Carroll County soon to remind residents to protect sources of public drinking water.The signs, which will be posted at 78 sites around the county this fall, are part of an effort to manage the county's fragile water resources, said Catherine Rappe, chief of Carroll's Bureau of Water Resource Management.The signs are believed to be the first of their kind in Maryland and along the Eastern seaboard. Carroll received a $15,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency through the state Department of the Environment to buy the signs and print brochures as part of a public education program for water resource management, Ms. Rappe said.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Carroll residents pushed the county to drill wells to supplement the water supply and to abandon plans for a $15 million treatment plant on Piney Run Lake at a public hearing last night in Sykesville. The county commissioners scheduled the hearing at Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department to gather comments on proposed revisions to the county's water-sewer master plan. The state must accept the revisions before the county can proceed with construction of the plant at Piney Run Lake.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
Carroll County's proposed water resource management ordinance is too strict and could harm efforts to bring businesses to the county, says a member of the county Economic Development Commission.The proposal, which is still in the development stage, would regulate any use of chemicals or other practice that could make drinking water unusable, county Bureau of Water Resource Management chief Catherine Rappe told the commission Wednesday."The [Environmental Protection Agency] spends years studying things and then sets certain standards," said David Roush, plant manager for Lehigh Portland Cement Co. in Uniontown.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
Carroll County has entered the hardware business and is scrambling for buyers. Profit would be tallied in water conservation, not dollars.Although prices are rock bottom for water conserving devices, sales are sluggish, said Catherine M. Rappe, chief of the water resource management bureau, which is selling the items at cost."
NEWS
May 3, 1994
Budget proposal to be presentedCarroll's county commissioners will present the proposed budget for fiscal 1995 at a public hearing at 7:30 p.m. on May 12 in the Westminster High School auditorium.The budget is expected to be about $142 million, about 9 percent more than the current year.Commissioner Donald I. Dell will open the hearing with comments, and Commissioners Elmer C. Lippy and Julia W. Gouge also will make statements.Budget director Steven Powell will read the legal notice of the budget before residents may make comments.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
Town Manager John Riley had hoped the higher water rates would attract large numbers of residents to a meeting on conservation.But only 17 people attended Thursday's free seminar on water conservation, sponsored by the Vaughn Women's Club of Hampstead, the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service, the town of Hampstead and the county Bureauof Water Resources Management."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
Carroll County has entered the hardware business and is scrambling for buyers. Profit would be tallied in water conservation, not dollars.Although prices are rock bottom for water conserving devices, sales are sluggish, said Catherine M. Rappe, chief of the water resource management bureau, which is selling the items at cost."
NEWS
April 18, 1993
Commissioners adopt harassment policyCarroll commissioners unanimously adopted an updated policy Thursday on handling employee discrimination and harassment complaints.Much of the language in the county's Equal Employment Opportunity and Sexual Harassment Policy comes from a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission manual. The manual was updated after law professor Anita Hill testified at Clarence Thomas' Supreme Court nomination hearing that he had sexually harassed her on the job.Carroll's new policy adds definitions of discrimination and harassment, and provides a more detailed procedure than the old policy for investigating and resolving complaints.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Carroll residents pushed the county to drill wells to supplement the water supply and to abandon plans for a $15 million treatment plant on Piney Run Lake at a public hearing last night in Sykesville. The county commissioners scheduled the hearing at Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department to gather comments on proposed revisions to the county's water-sewer master plan. The state must accept the revisions before the county can proceed with construction of the plant at Piney Run Lake.
NEWS
November 28, 1990
SEWER BAN IS LIFTEDELDERSBURG - The moratorium on connections to the Freedom District Wastewater Treatment plant has been lifted temporarily to allow hookups for more than 50 new homes and three commercial projects.The allocations amount to about 20,000 gallons per day of additional service, and will connect mostly in the Sykesville area.The moratorium was enacted in 1988, when the plant, which serves the Eldersburg and Sykesville areas, began nearing its capacity of 1.8 million gallons a day.The allocations came as somewhat of a surprise because county officials had said no more taps would be allocated until 1992.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
Budget proposal to be presentedCarroll's county commissioners will present the proposed budget for fiscal 1995 at a public hearing at 7:30 p.m. on May 12 in the Westminster High School auditorium.The budget is expected to be about $142 million, about 9 percent more than the current year.Commissioner Donald I. Dell will open the hearing with comments, and Commissioners Elmer C. Lippy and Julia W. Gouge also will make statements.Budget director Steven Powell will read the legal notice of the budget before residents may make comments.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Outdoor signs depicting water dripping from a faucet to a glass will be popping up around Carroll County soon to remind residents to protect sources of public drinking water.The signs, which will be posted at 78 sites around the county this fall, are part of an effort to manage the county's fragile water resources, said Catherine Rappe, chief of Carroll's Bureau of Water Resource Management.The signs are believed to be the first of their kind in Maryland and along the Eastern seaboard. Carroll received a $15,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency through the state Department of the Environment to buy the signs and print brochures as part of a public education program for water resource management, Ms. Rappe said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
Carroll County's proposed water resource management ordinance is too strict and could harm efforts to bring businesses to the county, says a member of the county Economic Development Commission.The proposal, which is still in the development stage, would regulate any use of chemicals or other practice that could make drinking water unusable, county Bureau of Water Resource Management chief Catherine Rappe told the commission Wednesday."The [Environmental Protection Agency] spends years studying things and then sets certain standards," said David Roush, plant manager for Lehigh Portland Cement Co. in Uniontown.
NEWS
April 18, 1993
Commissioners adopt harassment policyCarroll commissioners unanimously adopted an updated policy Thursday on handling employee discrimination and harassment complaints.Much of the language in the county's Equal Employment Opportunity and Sexual Harassment Policy comes from a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission manual. The manual was updated after law professor Anita Hill testified at Clarence Thomas' Supreme Court nomination hearing that he had sexually harassed her on the job.Carroll's new policy adds definitions of discrimination and harassment, and provides a more detailed procedure than the old policy for investigating and resolving complaints.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
Town Manager John Riley had hoped the higher water rates would attract large numbers of residents to a meeting on conservation.But only 17 people attended Thursday's free seminar on water conservation, sponsored by the Vaughn Women's Club of Hampstead, the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service, the town of Hampstead and the county Bureauof Water Resources Management."
NEWS
November 28, 1990
SEWER BAN IS LIFTEDELDERSBURG - The moratorium on connections to the Freedom District Wastewater Treatment plant has been lifted temporarily to allow hookups for more than 50 new homes and three commercial projects.The allocations amount to about 20,000 gallons per day of additional service, and will connect mostly in the Sykesville area.The moratorium was enacted in 1988, when the plant, which serves the Eldersburg and Sykesville areas, began nearing its capacity of 1.8 million gallons a day.The allocations came as somewhat of a surprise because county officials had said no more taps would be allocated until 1992.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
Carroll County has entered the hardware business and is looking for buyers. Profit would be tallied in water conservation, not dollars.Although prices are rock bottom for water conserving devices, sales are sluggish, said Catherine M. Rappe, chief of the water resource management bureau, which is selling the items at cost."
NEWS
October 2, 1991
Tom Devilbliss, a hydrologist with the Bureau of Water Resource Management, told members of the Environmental Affairs Advisory Board lastweek that a number of trout streams in the county have been identified for upgrade in classification.In hearings that will take placeover the next year, Devilbliss said the "proposed changes for reclassification on Snowden's Run and three unnamed public tributaries in Eldersburg will be heard."Populations of brook trout have been found in these streams whichpresently are considered Class I and reclassifying to Class III would designate the streams as natural trout waters, making them suitablefor the growth and propagation of trout.
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