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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Baltimore County residents served by the city's water system won't see a rate increase this year, county officials said Tuesday, despite a city proposal to impose a 15 percent increase. Baltimore City's Department of Public Works proposed the rate increase this week. The city and county have had a cost-sharing agreement for decades. But a county spokeswoman said budget officials have already determined that the county can absorb the increased cost without passing it on to county customers - even though they don't yet have specifics on how much the county might have to cover.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
Comedy Central today renewed "Drunk History" for a third season. The series, which features drunken performers recounting stories from our national past, is created by Lutherville native Derek Waters. This past week's epsiode featured three tales from Baltimore's past. Through the first four epsiodes of Season 2, the series' viewership is up 26 percent among adults 18-49. It's up 17 percent among all viewers. In its timeslot, Tuesdays at 10 p.m., it is the highest-rated original series in TV with men 18-34 years of age. Last season, "Drunk History" averaged one million viewers a week.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore officials voted Wednesday to raise water and sewer rates by 42 percent over three years, despite residents who pleaded for relief and a city audit that called the increase "higher than necessary. " Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who controls the spending panel that approved the increase, said she didn't have the "luxury" of voting against it. As mayor, she said, it's her responsibility to work to prevent breakdowns and repair water system problems. "Crumbling infrastructures have reached a crisis point in cities across America, including Baltimore," Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
The Annapolis mayoral election was too close to call Tuesday night, with neither candidate declaring victory or conceding defeat. With 15 of 16 precincts unofficially reporting at 9:45 p.m., incumbent Democratic Mayor Josh Cohen had 3,468 votes to 3,518 votes for Republican challenger Mike Pantelides. Cohen said there were problems with one voting machine at a precinct in Ward 7. Only one of the two precincts in that ward reported results Tuesday. Annapolis elections officials said Tuesday that more than 300 absentee ballots were mailed to voters.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
Sit down when you open your next WSSC water bill - rates just went up another 7.3 percent! When we moved into our West Laurel home 13 years ago our quarterly water bill was around $60. I was happy with that - it seemed like a reasonable amount to pay for water. Starting in 2007 or so, I noticed that our bills were increasing - they topped $100 for the first time. Yes, we were using more water as our family grew, but not that much more. Every year after that the increases kept coming.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County residents will soon pay more for drinking water and for flushing toilets. The county is proposing to raise water and wastewater rates by about 5 percent when the new fiscal year begins July 1. Water rates will be increased from $2.68 per 1,000 gallons to $2.81 per 1,000 gallons. Wastewater rates will go up from $4.71 per 1,000 gallons to $4.94 per 1,000 gallons. A proposed 15 percent increase in Baltimore City's water rates is only a minor factor in the decision to raise Anne Arundel's rates, according to Matt Diehl, a spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.
NEWS
November 6, 2002
The mayor and Town Council of Hampstead will hold a workshop on water rates at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Town Hall. Councilman Haven N. Shoemaker Jr. said town water rates have not changed in 11 years. The Town Council must approve new water rates. Water rates usually are passed as an ordinance with at least one public hearing. A change in water rates takes into consideration population growth, the town's water infrastructure and costs business, including federal regulations, said Town Manager Ken Decker.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 1, 2000
ON A WARM DAY, I pulled the garden hose out of winter storage, washed the cars and began chanting "self-sustaining operation." That is a phrase I heard as the price of water, along with the spring onions, shot up. This week Baltimore officials proposed increasing the water and sewer rates, an increase that affects the city and five surrounding counties tapped into the water supply. I don't pretend to understand the intricacies of municipal water management. But at home, I preside over the pipes.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
An article in Wednesday's Carroll County section of The Sun incorrectly characterized Union Bridge water and sewer rates. A rate increase was introduced Monday; it will be voted on in the July 25 meeting. Also, the proposed fee for sewer use above 15,000 gallons per quarter was misstated. Under the proposed rate structure, the charge would be $1.95 for each 1,000 gallons of sewer use above 15,000 gallons.The Sun regrets the errors.Union Bridge residents will be paying more for water and sewer service beginning in October.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | October 30, 1991
Water and sewer rates for county utility customers should be raised to reduce an operating deficit and make the systems more self-sufficient, say the county commissioners."
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 8, 2013
The idea of having Harford County served by a single governmental entity responsible for providing clean water and treating sewage on the whole is a good one. There are, however, aspects of such a system that deserve close public scrutiny as the water and sewer authority is being established. As the water and sewer authority would be managed by an appointed board that will have the authority to set rates, the general public needs to be assured a level of dominion over the service.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
Sit down when you open your next WSSC water bill - rates just went up another 7.3 percent! When we moved into our West Laurel home 13 years ago our quarterly water bill was around $60. I was happy with that - it seemed like a reasonable amount to pay for water. Starting in 2007 or so, I noticed that our bills were increasing - they topped $100 for the first time. Yes, we were using more water as our family grew, but not that much more. Every year after that the increases kept coming.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore officials voted Wednesday to raise water and sewer rates by 42 percent over three years, despite residents who pleaded for relief and a city audit that called the increase "higher than necessary. " Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who controls the spending panel that approved the increase, said she didn't have the "luxury" of voting against it. As mayor, she said, it's her responsibility to work to prevent breakdowns and repair water system problems. "Crumbling infrastructures have reached a crisis point in cities across America, including Baltimore," Rawlings-Blake said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 3, 2013
Despite a foul-smelling algae bloom and fish kill this time last year, Baltimore's ailing harbor actually earned a C-minus grade overall for water quality in 2012, according to the latest ecological report card issued by the Healthy Harbor campaign. But even that mediocre rating, to be issued Monday at an Inner Harbor press conference, comes with a big asterisk, as the report card's compilers note that rainfall last year was far below normal, reducing the amount of pollution washed off city and suburban streets, parking lots and yards.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
I want to both honor and condemn The Sun for its coverage of an issue that the average city citizen feels both perplexed and confused about. It's difficult for people to understand how they can be taxed with a Stormwater Utility Fee buried among 20 ballot questions in last year's election and then turn around and be hit with a proposed "rain tax" and a subsequent 15 percent increase proposed by the city's Department of Public Works ("Baltimore water...
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Baltimore's spending board voted Wednesday to approve another property tax break for city homeowners, part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to cut property taxes by 22 percent over 10 years. The tax credit approved by the Board of Estimates would knock $140 off the median property tax bill on owner-occupied homes. That is on top of the $40 cut that came when the panel created the credit last year. The numbers are based on the taxes that would be due on a property assessed at $200,000.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
The Carroll County Commissioners objected yesterday to a planned 16 percent increase in Baltimore water rates because most of the extra money will go to fix parts of the city's decaying infrastructure that have little direct impact on Carroll. The county draws much of its water from the city-owned Liberty Reservoir but maintains its own treatment plants and networks of pipes. Commissioners say Carroll would be paying 16 percent more for untreated water while deriving little benefit from planned upgrades to the city's water and sewer systems.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
To keep from having to increase water rates in the middle of a fiscal year, Baltimore County officials have decided to appeal a ruling that would have required the county to pay Baltimore $10.2 million to settle a 13-year dispute over water rates.County Executive Roger B. Hayden said the county was fighting the decision by an arbitration panel because it constitutes "retroactive rate-making.""If the ruling is allowed to stand, it would force the county to increase charges to customers in the middle of a fiscal year, which would be unfair," the executive said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County residents will soon pay more for drinking water and for flushing toilets. The county is proposing to raise water and wastewater rates by about 5 percent when the new fiscal year begins July 1. Water rates will be increased from $2.68 per 1,000 gallons to $2.81 per 1,000 gallons. Wastewater rates will go up from $4.71 per 1,000 gallons to $4.94 per 1,000 gallons. A proposed 15 percent increase in Baltimore City's water rates is only a minor factor in the decision to raise Anne Arundel's rates, according to Matt Diehl, a spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
There is an old adage, often heard in the local marinas, that a boat is nothing more than a hole in the water into which you pour money. Turns out the same could be said about Baltimore's water and sewer system - it is a money-soaking hole that puts the Queen Mary to shame. That the city's water system is old and deteriorating is nothing new. No doubt there are pipes still in the ground that would have served Edgar Allan Poe in his day - if the notorious drinker ever had a taste for non-alcoholic beverages, that is. But that problem was apparent last year, and the year before, and the year before that, and on and on. For more than a decade, Baltimore has been raising water rates annually by 9 percent or more.
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