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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Power was restored to a city pumping station Saturday afternoon, after a morning outage had public works officials calling for water conservation throughout much of Baltimore County's central corridor. Repairs were completed with no disruption to service, officials said. The outage was discovered at the station in the 400 block of Hillen Road at about 6 a.m. and could have affected the water supply for as many as 150,000 customers from Towson north to Sparks. BGE crews reported that the pumping station was again operational as of 12:36 p.m. Any drop in water pressure would have started in the far northern service area before working its way toward Towson, Baltimore Public Works spokesman Kurt Kocher said.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Traffic in the Ruxton area of Baltimore County was disrupted on Thursday morning because of a water main problem, State Highway Administration officials said. SHA spokesman David Buck said that a water main problem along Old Court Road between Falls Road and Stone Mill Road forced the close of the westbound side of the road. Buck said that traffic is being alternated on the eastbound side. Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
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BUSINESS
December 20, 1998
Several new homebuyers, including Steve Alexander of Bel Air and Karen L. Battenfeld and Mark E. Locklear of Joppa, have been aggravated by water runoff problems on their lots. Their complaints include standing or pooling water, damage to grass, soil erosion and damp basements. All these problems may have been caused by improper site grading, which allows water to accumulate, seep into basements or create gullies.The homebuilders have been unable or unwilling to address the water problems satisfactorily.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
A broken 10-inch-wide water main in Southwest Baltimore caused a sinkhole to open on Frederick Avenue near its intersection with East Lynne Avenue late Tuesday night, according to city officials. The water main was shut off quickly and Frederick Avenue was closed at the intersection, in the city's Mill Hill neighborhood, said Kurt Kocher, a public works spokesman. About 100 homes in the southwest neighborhood remained without water Wednesday, as crews arrived early to begin repairs to the pipe, he said.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
The Carroll commissioners will hold a public hearing to discuss the possibility of extending water lines to Maple Crest, a 30-year-old subdivision south of Westminster that has struggled for years with water problems. The neighborhood of about 50 homes has no public water and residents rely on private wells. Some wells run low part of the year and others go dry during droughts. More than a few have dried up, forcing residents to truck in water. A date for the hearing has not been set. To remedy the community's water problem, the county has solicited bids under two scenarios.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2004
Dear Mr. Azrael: I wonder what can be done about buyers being misled and what I can do in my situation. I recently purchased a condominium and the disclosure signed by the seller checked no water or moisture problems. I did not have a home inspection as there were no structure or roof issues to be addressed by me. I am responsible for the fireplace/chimney and asked for an inspection of this since a liner is expensive. I did not move in for more than a month and took items down to the condo on occasion.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A reader is concerned about underground springs that threaten to cause water seeping into her home. She purchased her home in 2001 from the first owner who bought it from the builder two years earlier. During 2001 and 2002, the reader spent $2,900 to correct subpar grading by making sure that surface water drained away from the house. Water problems continued in 2003. After Tropical Storm Isabel, the sump pump ran more frequently. A county water supervisor "told me that several areas where I live have underground springs and they can pop up when the groundwater level gets high," says the reader.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
Bushy Park Elementary School was forced to close yesterday when the school's water pump broke, leaving it without water.But the repairs were expected to be completed in time for the Glenwood school to reopen on time this morning, Principal Philip Arbaugh said. He added that yesterday was the first time the school had closed because of water problems.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2004
A Nottingham reader bought an older home in October. Before settlement, she had a home inspection and a walk-through done. No water problems were observed. Twelve days after settlement, the buyer saw water near a basement wall. She contacted the former owner, who told her that twice he had major incidents involving water in the basement, both of which he corrected. The owner said he had told the buyer and her real estate agent about the problems when they first viewed the home. The buyer said the owner never mentioned water problems.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | May 21, 1994
No doubt about it, indoor plumbing is the greatest convenience in shelter since the discovery of the door. But it's also the source of a huge number of homeowner headaches. We've gotten a series of questions recently about water problems such as burbling pipes and dripping walls. A reader in Severna Park offers another water puzzle."Our problem is the moaning noise [not hammer noise] we hear when we turn on the water. It's difficult to determine where the noise originates since the sound travels along the water routes and finally to the water heater . . . We've had the county water utility people examine it and they felt the cause might be due to high water pressure, and after some cajoling they installed a water-pressure reduction valve in the water main.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 15, 2012
Trading pollution "credits" to reduce the cost of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay risks endangering the health of the region's poor and minority communities, a new report warns. The report by the Washingon-based Center for Progressive Reform contends that without explicit safeguards, water-quality trading programs being launched in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia could result in localized concentrations of nutrient pollution, most likely in urban areas with already degraded waters.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 14, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay's water quality has taken a turn for the better, state officials report, as the oxygen-starved 'dead zone' where fish, crabs and shellfish struggle to breathe has shrunk to its second smallest since 1985. Water samples taken in early August found that 11.8 percent of the Maryland portion of the bay has poor oxygen levels, nearly half the long-term average for this time of year, according to a report posted online by the state Department of Natural Resources . That's a turnaround from July, when the volume of water with low oxygen levels was above average.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Thousands of Baltimore County residents have probably paid hundreds of dollars too much for their use of the city's public sewage system - and most are not even aware of it, county officials acknowledge. More than 200,000 county households get their water from Baltimore City, where an error-prone billing system overcharged its customers in both jurisdictions by at least $4.2 million in the past few years. But in Baltimore County, the errors are multiplied because of the method sewer charges are calculated for these customers: The county's budget and finance office multiplies the city-issued water bills by three.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Overnight Tuesday, a wormlike apparatus with green plastic tentacles sending out electromagnetic waves was to wind its way through nearly six miles of a Baltimore water main, detecting potential trouble areas along the pipe. "This is better for pipes that can't be taken out of service" for manual checks, said Travis Wagner, a civil engineer with Pure Technologies, a company with offices in Columbia that owns the tool, called the PipeDiver. The device is being used to inspect the Southwest Transmission Main, a stretch of pipe that is more than four feet in diameter and runs from the Ashburton Water Filtration Plant in Northwest Baltimore into Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
Power was restored to a city pumping station Saturday afternoon, after a morning outage had public works officials calling for water conservation throughout much of Baltimore County's central corridor. Repairs were completed with no disruption to service, officials said. The outage was discovered at the station in the 400 block of Hillen Road at about 6 a.m. and could have affected the water supply for as many as 150,000 customers from Towson north to Sparks. BGE crews reported that the pumping station was again operational as of 12:36 p.m. Any drop in water pressure would have started in the far northern service area before working its way toward Towson, Baltimore Public Works spokesman Kurt Kocher said.
NEWS
January 28, 2010
As a land developer in Baltimore County, I disagree with your view of the state's pending storm water regulations completely ("Storm over storm water," Jan. 26). The single-family home subdivisions that I am building contribute minutely to the problems of the Chesapeake Bay. My projects all have stormwater facilities that catch and clean water. You are missing the elephant in the room with us! How about all of the old projects that don't have any facilities and the runoff then dumps directly into the Chesapeake Bay?
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1999
More than a dozen homeowners along Sunset Drive outside Hampstead want the town to annex their properties so they can have public water.Since August, several homeowners have experienced water-pressure problems, and some fear their water supply may suddenly dry up. Residents presented an informal petition for annexation to the Town Council last week.Mayor Christopher M. Nevin said last week that town officials would do whatever they could to help the homeowners, who rely on wells for water.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2000
Dear Mr. Azrael: My husband and I bought a house in mid-February. The house is in a new development where more homes are being built. Our house is about 1 1/2 years old, and we bought it from the original owners, who had it built. The back yard slopes down toward the house, and every time it rains, the back yard floods and retains water for well over 24 hours. Several weeks ago, when we had a big rain here in Maryland, there was also a small amount of water in our basement, coming in through the concrete walls and below the basement door, damaging many of the boxes of "stuff" we haven't had a chance to unpack.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Over the last two years, scientists working on the Potomac River have netted 111 smallmouth bass with bizarre sexual traits. The fish were males but had eggs growing inside their testes. Researchers found many of these gender-bending bass downstream from sewage treatment plants in water tinged with a chemical called ethinylestradiol - the active ingredient in birth control pills. More studies are necessary, biologists say, but evidence is mounting that trace levels of prescription drugs in rivers and streams may be harming fish, tadpoles, frogs, mussels and oysters.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A reader is concerned about underground springs that threaten to cause water seeping into her home. She purchased her home in 2001 from the first owner who bought it from the builder two years earlier. During 2001 and 2002, the reader spent $2,900 to correct subpar grading by making sure that surface water drained away from the house. Water problems continued in 2003. After Tropical Storm Isabel, the sump pump ran more frequently. A county water supervisor "told me that several areas where I live have underground springs and they can pop up when the groundwater level gets high," says the reader.
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