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By Dean Uhler | September 29, 2002
Why does the water heater in my new house have another small tank hanging off the side of the pipe above it? That is an expansion tank installed on the water supply pipe to the water heater. Its purpose is to deal with thermal expansion of water as it heats up in the water heater - to prevent water pressure from getting too high. If water pressure gets high enough it can damage valves in plumbing fixtures, joints in supply pipes and even the water heater. Thermal expansion always occurs in water heaters.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Hundreds of customers lost water service in the Baltimore area Friday after two separate water main issues, officials said. A 12-inch main in the 300 block of Kenwood Ave. in East Baltimore was shut off for repairs Thursday night, with about 200 to 300 customers and two hydrants affected, city department of public works officials said. A 16-inch main at Back River Neck Road and Holly Neck Road in Essex also broke early Friday morning, and about 500 customers and Essex Skypark Airport were affected.
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NEWS
November 9, 1993
Chesapeake High, Chesapeake Middle and Bodkin Elementary schools were scheduled to reopen today now that water pressure in the system that serves the three buildings has returned to normal, an Anne Arundel County school spokeswoman said.The schools were closed yesterday after a maintenance worker at the school discovered the lack of pressure, said Nancy Jane Adams, the spokeswoman. The decision to close schools was made by 5:45 a.m., but school buses were already en route to pick up senior high school students.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Several water main breaks in the city and Baltimore County Wednesday night and Thursday morning shut down roads and are affecting service to hundreds of customers. A 30-inch, cast iron main that dates back to the 19th century broke in downtown Baltimore at East Madison Street and Guilford Avenue at around 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, according to the Baltimore City Department of Public Works. Spokesman Kurt Kocher had no firm estimate of how many customers were without water in the areas nearby, but said workers had addressed issues with low water pressure at Mercy Hospital.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 11, 1999
Water pressure dropped in some Baltimore neighborhoods this week as about 100 fire hydrants were illegally opened by people seeking relief from oppressive heat, city officials reported yesterday.No major problems with hydrants occurred, but the city's Department of Public Works warns that the practice could drain water supplies to hospitals and keep firefighters from quickly dousing fires.Anyone caught opening a hydrant may be charged with illegally tampering with city water, a misdemeanor that carries a $500 fine and up to six months in jail.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2001
Few things leave a person more unsatisfied in the morning than a showerhead that emits a mere trickle of water. These frustrating mechanisms have become the center of a controversy at New Windsor's Blue Ridge Manor development. Residents of about a dozen homes built on high ground say they have insufficient water pressure, a problem town officials say they foresaw years ago. The homes aren't far enough below the town water tower for gravity to create the requisite pressure. The developer, William Schneider, acknowledges the problem but says the town won't accept his proposed solutions.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
When Bridget and Kevin Leahy started building a wide, tiered deck across the back of their home in Sykesville, they never expected to have a view of a 130-foot-high water tower.But county officials are proposing a million-gallon water tower for a 1-acre site just south of Nickoles Drive, where the Leahys and several other families live. The county says the tower is needed to improve fire protection in South Carroll, but residents are concerned that it would also mean the destruction of many mature trees.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
While South Carroll, the county's most populous area, struggles with a water shortage, neighbors to the north face the opposite problem.The residents of Diamond Hills, just outside Westminster, say they have too much water.And too much of a good thing is bad for the plumbing and bad for the checkbook."I replaced my water heater a few years ago because I thought it was leaking," said Ray Kerr, who was one of the first to move into the subdivision, off Kate Wagner Road south of the city limits, in 1994.
NEWS
July 10, 1991
Some Baltimoreans like to cool themselves on steamy summer days by jumping into the water gushing from an open fire hydrant. That seemingly innocent practice reduces the water pressure needed to fight fires, however.City officials are offering a sprinkler unit that attaches to the hydrant, allowing residents to cool themselves without greatly reducing the water pressure.For more information, call the major's office at 396-4055.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
The thermostat in Matt Rechkemmer's luxury apartment overlooking Oriole Park at Camden Yards read 85 degrees Sunday afternoon, and he wondered whether he'd be able to take a shower before going to work Monday morning. "It's incredibly frustrating," said Rechkemmer, whose 12th-story apartment in the Zenith, an upscale high-rise apartment building in downtown Baltimore, has been without air conditioning since late Wednesday and without water since Saturday. "It's blazing hot in here, and you can't really do anything without creating more heat," he said.
NEWS
Editorial from The Record | November 7, 2013
Hidden amid the public safety infrastructure of many large buildings, public and private, and largely unknown to the general public are water flow alarms. Hooked into the water supplies of buildings, they're triggered to send an automatic alarm signal to the nearest 911 center when water pressure drops. It's an invention that's ingenious in its simplicity. Many large buildings are equipped with sprinkler systems that are triggered, in some way shape or form, by the heat of a fire.
NEWS
Donald C. Helm | October 31, 2013
Large-scale plans for hydraulic fracturing and natural gas export in Maryland have recently been set in motion. From my vantage point as a scientist, let me point to clear dangers in hydrofracking. A physical process occurs that is overlooked by methane gas developers. This overlooked process is the upward migration of fractures from depth. A breakthrough in understanding this physical process came with the publication of an award winning paper entitled "Hydraulic forces that play a role in generating fissures at depth" by D.C. Helm, published in the Bulletin of the Association of Engineering Geologists.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Water returned by late Tuesday morning to thousands of households and businesses in South and Southeast Baltimore after a water main break disrupted that service Monday night, according to the Department of Public Works. The problems began about 8:30 p.m. Monday, when some residents saw diminishing water pressure and others lost water altogether as the main break nearly drained a water tank in Curtis Bay, said Kurt Kocher, a department spokesman. If customers remain without water, they should call 311 and report the problem, Kocher said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
The break of a 10-inch water main at Interstate 83 near Maryland Avenue likely won't be fixed for a few days because it's in a bad spot and repairs will require specific equipment, according to officials from the city Department of Public Works. DPW spokesman Kurt Kocher said the break occurred at about 4:30 p.m. Saturday, and crews shut off water so it would not leak onto the highway and freeze. That also cut water flow to the University of Baltimore Law Center, which is near the intersection of West Mount Royal and Maryland avenues.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
A broken water main that had the potential to affect 2,600 homes and business in eastern Baltimore County has been repaired and water pressure was restored Wednesday morning, a city public works spokesman said. Crews discovered the break in the 12-inch water main on Simmons Avenue, along a water main leading to the Colgate Water Tank in the county, about 3 p.m. Tuesday, said Kurt Kocher, a public works spokesman. The affected homes were along Eastern Avenue in the Eastwood and Colgate areas.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
City work crews have located, removed and replaced the old pipe that ruptured Monday and sent water cascading through several downtown streets, fully restoring service to the affected neighborhood. By 9 a.m. Tuesday, a new 30-inch main had been installed, officials said. Testing of the new main lasted through the afternoon, an official said. Repairs were completed Tuesday night, and service was fully restored to the local customers who had been without water service or had experienced low pressure through much of the day, said Tiffani Church, a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
A water main break in Ellicott City yesterday temporarily left 15,000 residents of Howard and Baltimore counties without water and flooded the intersection of Frederick and Toll House roads.The break occurred about 4:45 a.m. near the northbound U.S. 29 exit ramp that leads to Ridge Road and U.S. 40, said Michael Giovanniello, deputy chief of the Howard County Bureau of Utilities.Water pressure was restored by 1 p.m., but because of the pipe's large size and the materials needed, it was expected to take 24 to 48 hours to repair the break fully.
NEWS
March 17, 2004
A water-main break at a pumping station near Pikesvile Monday caused a sudden drop in water pressure last night, leaving many homes and businesses without water. The drop in pressure forced the Baltimore County Fire Department to place extra equipment - including large-capacity water tankers - on standby in the event of a fire, a department official said. Affected were customers in Pikesville, Owings Mills, Woodlawn and Randallstown. A desk clerk at the Pikesville Hilton on Reisterstown Road at the Beltway said several rooms had no water last night.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
For the second time in six days, Baltimore's aging water system ruptured, affecting service to dozens of businesses and homes downtown and in Essex, including two hospitals, while snarling traffic and providing yet another unpleasant reminder of the region's crumbling infrastructure. A 30-inch pipe downtown at East Madison Street near Guilford Avenue broke shortly before 8 a.m. and sent water gushing down Guilford as well as the Fallsway. Businesses and institutions in a 12- to 14-block area either lost water altogether or saw pressure drop, including Mercy Medical Center, Our Daily Bread and Center Stage . As crews labored to restore water pressure to most buildings in that area, a 16-inch pipe broke late in the morning on Philadelphia Road near Rossville Boulevard, affecting water service to Essex businesses and homes, including MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center and the Community College of Baltimore County's Essex campus.
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