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ENTERTAINMENT
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1997
If you're looking for a way to cool off with a splash this summer, there are water rides and amusements to satisfy any thirst for thrills within driving distance of Baltimore.Torpedo tubes send riders rocketing through tunnels, and high-speed water slides twist and turn to the ultimate splashdown. There are leisurely river float trips, miniature slides and interactive devices that shoot, spray and dump water by the gallons.A thrilling new log boat ride at Adventure World in Largo will roar through high-speed channels and a pitch-dark tunnel, plunge passengers backward down hair-raising water chutes, jolt along through camel-hump chutes and spin wildly in a whirlpool before crashing down a heart-stopping plunge and flying out of the mouth of a skull.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Six Flags America, an amusement park in Upper Marlboro, said Thursday it would introduce its 14 t h major attraction in its water park — a set of six tubes more than six stories tall that can accommodate six riders simultaneously, the company said. The attraction, called Bonzai Pipelines, will open next season within the Hurricane Harbor water section of the park. Visitors will free fall through clear tubing for 50 feet and then slide an additional 200 feet in darkness, the company said.
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FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 15, 1997
Here's a guaranteed cure for those "what do we do now?" vacation blues: Grab the sunscreen and hustle the kids off to soak their heads.Literally -- at the nearest water park. It's the one vacation outing that won't be met with groans, even from the teens in the group whose mantra is "parents can't possibly have a good idea." A little rain won't spoil the fun (as long as there's no lightning), nor will the heat, since everyone can immediately cool off.The best news: Whether you've opted for a large park or a small one (Morey's Pier in New Jersey is less than 2 acres; call 609- 522-5431)
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Close to the southern boundary of Annapolis, near the mouth of the 340-acre park deemed the jewel of Anne Arundel County's park system, proposed developments have sparked citywide debate on how to protect trees. These last two big tracts of undeveloped forest along Forest Drive are projected to become the site of hundreds of homes and a senior community. Plans for that development have drawn 1,500 petition signatures and opposition from 19 environmental and community groups. "People get really upset when they see the last of the forests going down, and they ask hard questions like, 'Shouldn't they be protected?
NEWS
May 25, 2008
Those who knit, or are interested in knitting, are invited to celebrate Worldwide Knit in Public Day at 10:30 a.m. June 14 in the pavilion outside Clyde's restaurant on the Columbia Lakefront. The event, which is sponsored by Columbia Sip & Knit, is open to knitters. World Wide Knit in Public Day began in 2005. The event, which is held on the second Saturday in June, is designed to show that knitting can be a community activity. Information: www.wwkipday.com. Around Town Theater camp : Slayton House Camp of the Arts is accepting registration for its musical theater camp for children who have completed full-day kindergarten and those in first through seventh grades.
NEWS
July 14, 1997
The real story behind the water slide tragedyOn June 14, The Sun carried a short story regarding the reopening of a water park in California two weeks after a fatal accident. In the interest of truthfulness, I wish to inform your readers of the following facts.The collapse of the water slide in the Concord water park was caused by teen-age misjudgment. The senior class from a Napa high school had spent the day at the park. When they were told by their chaperones that they would be leaving, many of them decided to ''clog'' the highest slide in an attempt to break a record held by the class of 1996, which got 60 people on the slide at once.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 2006
Aaron Smith was on a mission. He wanted to be the first one down the water slide in Harford County's first water park. The 9-year-old waited at the Arena Club in Bel Air on opening day until the lifeguards cut the yellow tape blocking the park entrance. The Elkton resident made a beeline for the slide and was first in line. He climbed the stairs to the 25-foot structure and got into the ready position at the top of the tunnel-like slide. The lifeguard gave the signal, and Aaron let go. About 10 seconds later, he flew off the end of the slide, crashing into the water in the landing pool.
NEWS
May 18, 2008
Afternoon Tea served on May 29 The Town Center Community Association will offer an Afternoon Tea at Historic Oakland from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. May 29. Tea will be served with savory sandwiches, desserts and warm scones in the ballroom of Historic Oakland Manor. The cost is $20 a person, and reservations are required at least two business days in advance. Around Town Theater camp : Slayton House Camp of the Arts is accepting registration for its musical theater for children who have completed full-day kindergarten and those in grades first through seventh.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2004
Last week's question: What is your favorite thing to do at amusement parks? 52.6 percent Ride the roller coasters (41 votes) 12.8 percent Watch the people (10 votes) 10.3 percent Ride the water rides (8 votes) 6.4 percent Play in the water park (5 votes) 5.1 percent Ride other rides (4 votes) 3.8 percent Play arcade games (3 votes) 3.8 percent Walk around (3 votes) 2.6 percent Cut lines (2 votes) 2.6 percent Eat (2 votes) 0 percent Shop (0 votes) 78 total votes Question of the week: What's the best summer movie so far?
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Six Flags America, an amusement park in Upper Marlboro, said Thursday it would introduce its 14 t h major attraction in its water park — a set of six tubes more than six stories tall that can accommodate six riders simultaneously, the company said. The attraction, called Bonzai Pipelines, will open next season within the Hurricane Harbor water section of the park. Visitors will free fall through clear tubing for 50 feet and then slide an additional 200 feet in darkness, the company said.
TRAVEL
By Rachel Martin, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
It's spring break for many students, and area amusement parks are ready to take visitors for a ride — up, down, sideways and backwards. Marylanders can take a day or weekend trip to one of these six theme parks, all within a few hours' drive of Baltimore. More than 300 million guests visit U.S. theme parks each year, and the recent economic downturn hasn't had a big effect on attendance, according to David Mandt, a spokesman for the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
When it opens next year, the Great Mall of China near Beijing will be the biggest retail and entertainment center in the world, with 15 million square feet of shops, a theme park, a water park — and the world's tallest indoor roller coaster, imported from Baltimore. The still-unnamed "super launch" coaster will be designed and built by Premier Rides, a company that specializes in roller coasters, water rides and other amusement park attractions. The mall's developer, the Berjaya Great Mall of China Co. Ltd., commissioned Premier to work on the project earlier this year after meeting the firm's president, Jim Seay, last June during a Maryland trade mission to China.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
NEWS
By Lauren Weiner | July 26, 2011
The authorities are coming down hard on kids' lemonade stands this summer. In Georgia, three girls trying to earn enough for a trip to a water park were told they needed $50 a day in business permits. In Wisconsin, the cops busted a pair of sisters who figured they could make some money selling lemonade to people headed to a nearby car show. (The police eventually backed down.) And right here in Maryland, Montgomery County authorities shut down a stand outside the U.S. Open golf tournament in June.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
It staggers the imagination to think that a little more than 20 years ago, the idea of saving a pristine neck of land on the South River and remaking it into a showplace public park would have been controversial. Now, two decades after Quiet Waters Park made its debut, the proof is that it attracts 700,000 visitors a year. The claims that it would bring noisy crowds, harm the environment and be too extravagant have evaporated. It's established itself as a beloved haven of sanctuary and sanity for its patrons, who praise its paths, forested groves, tucked-away gardens and water views.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 22, 2010
With a handful of amusement parks within easy driving distance, Baltimoreans can spend their summer weekends sampling breath-taking roller coasters, cavorting with some of their kids' favorite animated characters or getting soaked even though they're miles from the nearest ocean. And for those who haven't been in a few years — maybe it's time to once again sample the simple summer pleasures that only an amusement park can provide. Here's a look at five parks within 200 miles of the center of Baltimore, along with a sampling of what new rides and attractions they have to offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 22, 2010
With a handful of amusement parks within easy driving distance, Baltimoreans can spend their summer weekends sampling breath-taking roller coasters, cavorting with some of their kids' favorite animated characters or getting soaked even though they're miles from the nearest ocean. And for those who haven't been in a few years — maybe it's time to once again sample the simple summer pleasures that only an amusement park can provide. Here's a look at five parks within 200 miles of the center of Baltimore, along with a sampling of what new rides and attractions they have to offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
It's that time of year again, when otherwise sane people shell out big bucks for the privilege of being spun, shaken, twisted and just plain thrown around like laundry in a dryer -- all in the name of fun. Memorial Day weekend marks the official opening of amusement-park season and the race for your entertainment dollar. Each summer, parks offer new rides and attractions designed to outdo last year's and the competition's. For the most part, this means rides that set your pulse to pounding and endorphins rushing -- in other words, rides with dizzying drops and that all-important factor: speed.
TRAVEL
May 19, 2010
Whether it's volleyball on the beach, strolling the Boardwalk, or angling on a pier with the sun setting on the water, Ocean City offers the kind of easy, beach vacay that everyone from families to college co-eds can enjoy. To make the most of those oh-so-fleeting summer days (and nights), with the help of some readers at baltimoresun.com, we've assembled a list of 100 things to do in Ocean City. 1. Wear sunscreen. It's such a drag, but skin cancer is worse. So apply sunblock before, during and after you hit the beach.
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