Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWater Lines
IN THE NEWS

Water Lines

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Baltimore water officials have been dogged in the past year by a series of extremely public problems: widespread billing errors that required millions in refunds, massive water main breaks that closed downtown streets, and a collapsed stormwater culvert that took five months and $7 million to fix. Accompanying those issues has been criticism from customers, many of whom are upset with rising costs and what they see as lapses in service. But city officials say that behind the scenes, they have been making progress on the city's aged and long-deteriorating water system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
City officials say the insurance program for broken water pipes they've been publicizing likely won't be available for several months, and possibly not until autumn. Baltimore first announced the insurance - which officials call a service contract - last year in connection with the approval of a system-wide overhaul of water meters, warning residents they would want to buy the insurance in case pipes break during the work. Kurt Kocher, a spokesman for Baltimore Department of Public Works, said recently there is a very small chance pipes could break during the overhaul of about 400,000 water meters in Baltimore City and Baltimore County.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | November 14, 2007
The Harford County Council voted 4-3 last night against a resolution that would extend public water lines to a Havre de Grace neighborhood. Wells at nine of the 84 homes in Glenn Heights community are contaminated with trichloroethylene, or TCE, a volatile organic compound. Lower levels of the industrial solvent were detected in about two dozen other wells, officials said. The Maryland Department of the Environment has installed filtration systems on the nine problematic wells and is monitoring the others periodically.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 22, 2013
Beginning today (Monday, April 22) the Maryland State Highway Administration said it will temporarily close Loflin Road at Route 7 (Old Philadelphia Road) near Aberdeen to relocate a Harford County water line under Route 7, a project that will take several months. The road closure and water line work is expected to be completed in late summer, weather permitting, the SHA said in a news release.  A detour route will direct motorists to westbound Route 40 (Pulaski Highway).   For safety and to complete the construction work, crews may temporarily close a single lane of Route 7 or Route 40 between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday and between 7 p.m. and 5 a.m. Monday through Thursday.  There may be occasional lane closures on Saturdays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.    Motorists with questions or concerns about the project may contact the SHA project field office in Aberdeen at 410-272-1805 or SHA's District 4 Office - Construction Division at 410-229-2420; toll free at 1-877-998-0367, or by e-mail: shadistrict4@sha.state.md.us .    While SHA and its transportation partners work hard to maintain safe traffic mobility in work zones, drivers are reminded to stay alert and look for reduced speed limits, narrow driving lanes and highway workers. Slow down and don't follow too closely. 
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | July 19, 1993
Clarksville residents are expected to present opposing views to the Howard County Council tonight about the prospect of bring county water lines to the area.Some have contaminated wells and want the county to provide them with water and sewer service. Others say the well water isn't all that bad. They fear that county water and sewer service will lead to increased development, threatening their bucolic style of life."I understand and share their concerns about increased development," said the Rev. Jeffrey Dauses of St. Louis Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
Carroll County commissioners voted unanimously yesterday to apply for a state grant that would offset the cost of extending water lines to Maple Crest, a 30-year-old subdivision south of Westminster that has suffered shortages for several years. "I think we should pursue the grant and then tackle this issue if and when we get the grant," said Commissioner Donald I. Dell. The commissioners have voiced support for the project, which would extend service to Wayne Avenue and Woodland Drive - streets with the most severe water problems - and possibly to Kolbe and Hook roads as well as Maple Crest Drive.
NEWS
March 8, 1993
Work to clean and line old, corroded water lines in the Linthicum area will begin in several weeks and continue for several months.Jody Vollmar, spokeswoman for the Anne Arundel County Utilities Department, will speak to the Linthicum-Shipley Improvement Association during the monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Linthicum Elementary School.Cleaner lines with better flow will mean clearer water and better fire protection, Ms. Vollmar said.When the lines were installed 50 to 60 years ago, workers used unlined cast-iron pipes, which have corroded over the years.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
The pungent smell of chlorine bleach permeates the Hutchison home, a handsome four-bedroom split-level just outside Westminster. The Hutchisons, a family of four, struggle daily to conserve water. They fear their well will run dry. So they cook with bottled water. They wash their clothes at the public laundry. And they clean their kitchen with bleach rather than soap and water. "Water is a necessity of life. You can't flush the commode, cook a meal or bathe without it," said Alice Hutchison, 59. "Most people never give it a second thought.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
About 35 homeowners in Maple Crest, a 30-year-old subdivision south of Westminster, met with County Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier last night to discuss extending city water lines to their neighborhood. The area has no public water, and residents rely on private wells. Some wells run low part of the year and others go dry during periods of drought. More than a few have dried up, forcing residents to bear the costly burden of trucking in water. "I've got a water-conditioning system that requires a lot of maintenance and costs me quite a bit of money.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
The Carroll commissioners are seeking bids to extend Westminster water lines to Maple Crest, a 30-year-old subdivision south of the county seat that has struggled with water problems for years. The neighborhood has no public water and residents rely on private wells. Some wells run low part of the year and others go dry during periods of drought. More than a few have dried up, forcing residents to bear the costly burden of trucking in water. The county is seeking bids that would show the costs of extending water lines under two scenarios.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 4, 2013
Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby said he is trying to set up a community meeting, possibly next week, to discuss the closing of the Roosevelt Park Recreation Center for up to a month to repair a broken water line. The city Department of Recreation and Parks closed the Roosevelt Park center at Falls Road and West 36th Street on March 28 after the kitchen drainage pipe broke, said spokeswoman Kia McLeod. A sign on the front door says, "Center closed until further notice due to mechanical repair emergencies.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Baltimore water officials have been dogged in the past year by a series of extremely public problems: widespread billing errors that required millions in refunds, massive water main breaks that closed downtown streets, and a collapsed stormwater culvert that took five months and $7 million to fix. Accompanying those issues has been criticism from customers, many of whom are upset with rising costs and what they see as lapses in service. But city officials say that behind the scenes, they have been making progress on the city's aged and long-deteriorating water system.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
I had a passing thought: I was wondering if the Baltimore City Department of Public works has an ark stored somewhere ("City crews repair two more ruptures in aging water lines," Nov. 14). You know, just in case. Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
City work crews have located, removed and replaced the old pipe that ruptured Monday and sent water cascading through several downtown streets, fully restoring service to the affected neighborhood. By 9 a.m. Tuesday, a new 30-inch main had been installed, officials said. Testing of the new main lasted through the afternoon, an official said. Repairs were completed Tuesday night, and service was fully restored to the local customers who had been without water service or had experienced low pressure through much of the day, said Tiffani Church, a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
City crews focused on connecting temporary water lines and clearing damaged areas of Light Street in downtown Baltimore on Wednesday in the beginning stages of a large repair operation following Monday's water main break. "One of the main concerns today was stabilization and safety, so we had to make sure that the gas lines and electric lines were protected," said Kurt Kocher, a city public works spokesman. Crews excavated stretches of the roadway in preparation for the removal of two water mains — the 20-inch-wide pipe dating to 1889 that burst Monday and a parallel 10-inch pipe dating to 1914 — but limited the exposure of the pipes while other pressing needs like water restoration were addressed, Kocher said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
East Cold Spring Lane was closed at the edge of Morgan State University's campus in Northeast Baltimore while public works crews repair a water main break, a department spokesman said Tuesday. The break occurred in the 1800 block of E. Cold Spring Lane, according to the spokesman, Kurt Kocher. The street was closed to traffic between Harford and Hillen roads, he said, and will be closed until at least Wednesday. About a dozen homes are affected. As a detour, motorists were urged to take Echodale Avenue or 32 n d Street.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
Carroll commissioners voted unanimously yesterday to apply for a state grant that would offset the cost of extending water lines to Maple Crest, a 30-year-old subdivision south of Westminster that has suffered shortages for several years. "I think we should pursue the grant and then tackle this issue if and when we get the grant," said Commissioner Donald I. Dell. His colleagues, Commissioners Julia Walsh Gouge and Robin Bartlett Frazier, agreed. Both said it would be foolish to pass up the chance to receive state money for the project.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
I had a passing thought: I was wondering if the Baltimore City Department of Public works has an ark stored somewhere ("City crews repair two more ruptures in aging water lines," Nov. 14). You know, just in case. Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham
NEWS
June 27, 2010
If the powers that be could somehow start over and create a Baltimore region from scratch, the design probably wouldn't call for the city to be the proprietor of the water system and leave the counties as customers. Like transit, highways, solid waste disposal and other public infrastructure, it probably ought to be a shared responsibility (and shared financial burden). Yet the resolution offered by Baltimore County Councilman Kevin Kamenetz and approved by the council earlier this month calling on the county to study a regional management system raises hackles.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 11, 2010
The water main break that left tens of thousands of Northwest Baltimore County residents without water for days has been repaired and is back in service, according to Baltimore's director of public works. DPW Director David Scott thanked residents for their patience while repairs took place after the break was discovered Saturday. The repairs were completed early Wednesday morning, said DPW spokeswoman Celeste Amato, a full day before the original Thursday estimate. That approximation was based on weather forecasts that called for rain, she said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.