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ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA] | July 12, 2007
To create the landscapes on display at the Gallery at MCAC, painter Konstantine Damala drew from existing locations and places he remembers from his childhood. The result is You Are Here, an exhibition that opens today and features farm ponds, horses, sheep and water lilies. The exhibition runs through Aug. 27 at the gallery, 1901 Monkton Road in Monkton. There is an opening reception 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Thursdays-Mondays. Call 410-472-0470 or go to mcaconline.
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EXPLORE
June 26, 2011
After 37 years, I am back in Paris. It feels as if I had just left about a month ago. The streets come back easily, the language not quite so easily, but easier than I had imagined. The crowds are greater, not just because it is June, but because the world is smaller. More people travel more often. A multi-generational family from Brazil rode on the train with us yesterday from the Gare St. Lazare to Giverny to see Monet's house and garden. The last time I was here, neither house nor garden was open daily to the public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 20, 1996
Lily Pons DaysWater lilies will be in full bloom this weekend for the annual "Lily Pons Days" at Lilypons Water Gardens in Buckeystown. The garden's 275 acres of exotic water lilies, lotus blossoms and goldfish ponds provide a backdrop for the two-day celebration.The event commemorates the 60th anniversary of the day the Metropolitan Opera star Lily Pons visited the gardens. There will be free lectures on water gardening, and roving musicians also are featured.Hours are 10: 30 a.m. to 4: 30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SAM SESSA] | July 12, 2007
To create the landscapes on display at the Gallery at MCAC, painter Konstantine Damala drew from existing locations and places he remembers from his childhood. The result is You Are Here, an exhibition that opens today and features farm ponds, horses, sheep and water lilies. The exhibition runs through Aug. 27 at the gallery, 1901 Monkton Road in Monkton. There is an opening reception 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Thursdays-Mondays. Call 410-472-0470 or go to mcaconline.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 17, 1991
Barbara Price-Campolattaro's "Le Ninfee" (the water lilies) at Loyola College (through May 2) offers evidence that it is possible to take on traditional subject matter and make it vital and relevant.Her nine large paintings (leaving aside six much smaller and less successful works) are simply and unmistakably of water lilies, but they avoid the pitfalls: They are neither stale, trite, sentimental, nor merely decorative.In them, she explores such things as surface, space and color, but she also creates paintings of considerable beauty, both in individual parts and as a whole.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
I have worms in my yard and would like to get rid of them. In the spring, when it's wet, they churn up the surface and make the ground soft, though the grass does grow. I have tried all kinds of chemicals at different times (diazinon, sevin, malathion), but nothing works. I thought about tearing up the yard and putting in new topsoil, but if I don't dig deep enough, I'm afraid they'll still be in the ground. Is there anything that will kill them? Earthworms are unique benefactors of soil, moving nutrients up to where they are available to plants, breaking down compounds and aerating.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
LILYPONS -- In this era of stress -- at home, at work, everywhere -- Charles Thomas sells tranquillity."We all have hectic lives. We yearn to have a beautiful place of peace and tranquillity and a garden like this is it," said Mr. Thomas.Water lilies, like exotic jewels -- red, yellow, white, blue, pink -- dot his ponds; a darting goldfish flashes a metallic glint; a sunbathing frog grunts and dives off a broad green-bronze lily pad to hide among the green rushes, furry cattails and violet water iris.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
When it rains, the water races down the camp's paved road -- picking up the trail of pollutants in its way -- and pours through a giant pipe until it is dumped into the defenseless Severn River. It's a poor lesson in doing what is good for the environment for the 26,000 students a year who visit Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. Yesterday -- with the help of 92 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade campers from throughout Anne Arundel County and two grownups the kids gleefully called "The Bog Men" -- the cleanup began with the construction of a wetland bog where the drainage pipe used to be. The bog -- a pond surrounded by sandy soil and peat moss, and nourished with carnivorous pitcher plants, rare Atlantic white cedar trees, blue flag irises and more -- acts like the filter in an aquarium, with each part working to remove the oil and nitrogen and more before runoff enters the Chesapeake Bay. Now there's a new lesson to be taught.
EXPLORE
June 26, 2011
After 37 years, I am back in Paris. It feels as if I had just left about a month ago. The streets come back easily, the language not quite so easily, but easier than I had imagined. The crowds are greater, not just because it is June, but because the world is smaller. More people travel more often. A multi-generational family from Brazil rode on the train with us yesterday from the Gare St. Lazare to Giverny to see Monet's house and garden. The last time I was here, neither house nor garden was open daily to the public.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 1998
Near the beginning of the show of 22 late Monet paintings that opens today at the Walters Art Gallery, there's a 10-foot-long canvas covered with strokes and loops and wisps and jabs of color. It's called "Water Lilies" (1917-1919), but it doesn't look like waterlilies.This work is a sketch, the beginnings of a painting. Monet would not have sent it into the world until he had developed it further. But to present-day eyes, conditioned by 20th-century abstraction, it could be complete. And it looks positively prophetic.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
I have worms in my yard and would like to get rid of them. In the spring, when it's wet, they churn up the surface and make the ground soft, though the grass does grow. I have tried all kinds of chemicals at different times (diazinon, sevin, malathion), but nothing works. I thought about tearing up the yard and putting in new topsoil, but if I don't dig deep enough, I'm afraid they'll still be in the ground. Is there anything that will kill them? Earthworms are unique benefactors of soil, moving nutrients up to where they are available to plants, breaking down compounds and aerating.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | June 13, 2004
Our need for water is more than basic biology; it's emotionally primal. Nothing dials back the blood pressure like a few hours spent by a shaded stream, a reflecting pool, or even a simple little container pond. It's like a brief return to the womb, where our sole obligation was to exist. "It's very soothing," says Margaret Koogle, owner of Lilypons in Buckeystown, which sells water gardens, ponds and water features (fountains and bubbling sculptures). "Our customers say having morning coffee by their pond or sitting by it in the evening is very relaxing."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
When it rains, the water races down the camp's paved road -- picking up the trail of pollutants in its way -- and pours through a giant pipe until it is dumped into the defenseless Severn River. It's a poor lesson in doing what is good for the environment for the 26,000 students a year who visit Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. Yesterday -- with the help of 92 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade campers from throughout Anne Arundel County and two grownups the kids gleefully called "The Bog Men" -- the cleanup began with the construction of a wetland bog where the drainage pipe used to be. The bog -- a pond surrounded by sandy soil and peat moss, and nourished with carnivorous pitcher plants, rare Atlantic white cedar trees, blue flag irises and more -- acts like the filter in an aquarium, with each part working to remove the oil and nitrogen and more before runoff enters the Chesapeake Bay. Now there's a new lesson to be taught.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 1998
Near the beginning of the show of 22 late Monet paintings that opens today at the Walters Art Gallery, there's a 10-foot-long canvas covered with strokes and loops and wisps and jabs of color. It's called "Water Lilies" (1917-1919), but it doesn't look like waterlilies.This work is a sketch, the beginnings of a painting. Monet would not have sent it into the world until he had developed it further. But to present-day eyes, conditioned by 20th-century abstraction, it could be complete. And it looks positively prophetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 20, 1996
Lily Pons DaysWater lilies will be in full bloom this weekend for the annual "Lily Pons Days" at Lilypons Water Gardens in Buckeystown. The garden's 275 acres of exotic water lilies, lotus blossoms and goldfish ponds provide a backdrop for the two-day celebration.The event commemorates the 60th anniversary of the day the Metropolitan Opera star Lily Pons visited the gardens. There will be free lectures on water gardening, and roving musicians also are featured.Hours are 10: 30 a.m. to 4: 30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
LILYPONS -- In this era of stress -- at home, at work, everywhere -- Charles Thomas sells tranquillity."We all have hectic lives. We yearn to have a beautiful place of peace and tranquillity and a garden like this is it," said Mr. Thomas.Water lilies, like exotic jewels -- red, yellow, white, blue, pink -- dot his ponds; a darting goldfish flashes a metallic glint; a sunbathing frog grunts and dives off a broad green-bronze lily pad to hide among the green rushes, furry cattails and violet water iris.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | June 13, 2004
Our need for water is more than basic biology; it's emotionally primal. Nothing dials back the blood pressure like a few hours spent by a shaded stream, a reflecting pool, or even a simple little container pond. It's like a brief return to the womb, where our sole obligation was to exist. "It's very soothing," says Margaret Koogle, owner of Lilypons in Buckeystown, which sells water gardens, ponds and water features (fountains and bubbling sculptures). "Our customers say having morning coffee by their pond or sitting by it in the evening is very relaxing."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 21, 1990
The Tennessee State Museum in Nashville is presenting an exclusive engagement of "Masterworks," a collection of 60 European paintings on loan from the Bridgestone Museum of Art in Tokyo.The exhibit, which opened last week and continues through Jan. 20, includes Picasso's "Saltimbanque Seated With Arms Crossed," Monet's "Water Lilies" and Renoir's "Mlle. Georgette Charpentier Seated," as well as works by Cezanne, Matisse, Modigliani and Van Gogh.The museum, at 505 Deaderick St., is open for extended hours for the exhibit: Mondays to Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays and Fridays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sundays 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibition tickets may be ordered through Ticketmaster (800)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 17, 1991
Barbara Price-Campolattaro's "Le Ninfee" (the water lilies) at Loyola College (through May 2) offers evidence that it is possible to take on traditional subject matter and make it vital and relevant.Her nine large paintings (leaving aside six much smaller and less successful works) are simply and unmistakably of water lilies, but they avoid the pitfalls: They are neither stale, trite, sentimental, nor merely decorative.In them, she explores such things as surface, space and color, but she also creates paintings of considerable beauty, both in individual parts and as a whole.
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