Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWater Levels
IN THE NEWS

Water Levels

NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Tim Craig and Jennifer McMenamin and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2000
Fierce, gusting winds from the northwest blew the water right out of Baltimore and Annapolis harbors yesterday, leaving water levels so low a fireboat responding to a Clinton Street dock blaze last night couldn't get close enough to hose it down. Pleasure boats at some marinas were grounded or tipped over in water levels estimated at 2 to 4 feet below normal while temperatures dipped to 18 degrees in the Baltimore metropolitan area, freezing waterlines needed to fight the fire on the Canton waterfront.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Most people throw out a jug of milk after a week or so. The oldest bottle of wine, on the other hand, is the most savored. But what about water? Some of what comes out of faucets in Annapolis, Leonardtown or Easton, it turns out, is older than the finest vintage — and the practice of dairy farming itself. Glaciers that melted more than two million years ago deposited layers of sediment around what is now the Chesapeake Bay. Underground rivers run between those layers, tapped by wells and recharged by rainfall over time.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
In a way, it was the perfect flood. Shifts in Isabel's winds, a timely high tide and something called the "slosh" effect all conspired early yesterday to produce some of the highest water levels ever recorded in communities around the Chesapeake Bay. The bay flooding was almost entirely the result of tidal phenomena, and not the unexpectedly modest rain that accompanied the storm in Maryland. Meteorologists said the high water broke or tied 70-year-old records in Baltimore, Annapolis and Washington, as it inundated streets along the Inner Harbor and Fells Point, communities in Eastern Baltimore County and towns on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - Leading water experts warned yesterday of shortages and a potential crisis if the United States proceeds without a national water policy that spells out cooperation between governments and regions. In letters to the White House, governors and every member of Congress, the experts argued that the country urgently needs to develop a "national water vision" to cope with shortages and other looming problems. The letter asserts that the United States' inability to effectively plan for drought, flooding and improved water quality jeopardizes the nation's strength not just at home but abroad.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 16, 2010
High water from the weekend rainstorm appeared to be cresting Monday without posing major threats to flood-prone locations along the Potomac and Susquehanna rivers. The partial failure of a wooden inlet lock along the C&O Canal five miles west of Washington prompted alerts to businesses along the canal where it enters the District of Columbia. Lock 5, at the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, was designed to feed water from the Potomac into the canal, according to park spokesman Bill Spinrad.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
Experts for opponents to a proposed $5 million foster care complex in Fallston testified that drawing water for the facility could cause water levels in nearby wells to drop significantly.Grant Andersonand Rob Schweinfurth, hydrogeology experts, testified at a zoning hearing Thursday that well water 200 feet from the proposed site of a main well for the complex could drop 8 feet.Wells 500 feet from the complex's main pumping well could see a water level drop of 4 to 5 feet, said the two men, who work for Engineering Technology Associates in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
As persistent dry conditions have led several Carroll County municipalities to enact voluntary water restrictions, Mount Airy could go one step further to temporarily ban the use of outdoor sprinklers as soon as this week, Mayor Frank Johnson said. Mount Airy officials recently unveiled a tiered system for phasing in possible water restrictions that could last until Sept. 15 and delay new water and sewer connections from being established before that date, Johnson said. "Usage is inching up as the drought continues," Johnson said.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Frank D. Roylance and Caitlin Francke and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
Saying that drought has imperiled Baltimore's stored water supply, public works officials are preparing to tap the Susquehanna River next week to save water in the three reservoirs that serve 1.8 million area residents. Public Works Director George L. Winfield urged residents served by city water to conserve voluntarily to stave off harsh water-use restrictions that might be imposed in spring if there is no significant rainfall. "The more we can do now, the better off we'll be come spring," Winfield said yesterday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.