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Water Levels

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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
A hydrogeologist delivered news yesterday that only schoolchildren would want to hear: Carroll will need several snowy days this winter to get its water supply back to normal."
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ocean City lifeguards have reported a spike in injuries among swimmers caught in dangerous wave breaks the past two days as Tropical Storm Bertha's passage stirs up the seas. About 20 injuries, most of them to swimmers' shoulders and collarbones, occurred Tuesday and Wednesday when unusually powerful waves came crashing down on the beach, said Butch Arbin, captain of the Ocean City Beach Patrol. Beachgoers have also reported unusually large tidepools taking up much of the beach.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
The Sumatran earthquake that triggered the devastating South Asian tsunami on Dec. 26 was so powerful its seismic waves coursed through the Earth's crust and sent water levels surging in a monitoring well in southwestern Virginia, 10,000 miles away. State and federal geologists said water in the 450-foot limestone well in Christiansburg began oscillating, surging upward at least 2 feet, and down at least 3 over a half-hour period as the seismic waves passed. It was five hours before the water returned to its former levels and calmed down.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
Texas Gov. Rick Perry was recently in Maryland trying to connive businesses into move to his state ( "O'Malley, Perry spar over jobs with 2016 in background," Sept. 18). The problem is, Texas cannot handle more people. Currently, there are too many people and not enough roads here in Texas, which perhaps explains why the roads are too congested and most days traffic is a nightmare. We are in a severe drought here in Texas. Water levels are plummeting and lakes are drying up. Groundwater levels are dropping.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | March 6, 1994
Fishing has been slow to develop, with ice and snow and high water levels, but there has been sporadic yellow perch activity on Tuckahoe Creek at Hillsboro, below the dam at Tuckahoe State Park, in the Nanticoke River near Seaford, Del., the Blackwater and in the Patuxent near Wayson's Corner.But with water levels high, especially in the Potomac River, great care should be taken by shoreline fishermen, and boating in some areas remains out of the question.
NEWS
April 26, 2001
Water levels at Liberty Reservoir have crested for the first time since June 1998, providing city customers a cushion in the event of a drought this year, according to Baltimore's Department of Public Works. By contrast, the reservoir dipped to 26 feet below crest during the drought in 1999. Loch Raven Reservoir crested March 30, and water levels at Prettyboy Reservoir are 2 1/2 feet below crest and rapidly rising, the agency said.
NEWS
January 27, 2002
Low water levels delay sewage system testing Current ground water levels in Carroll County have prompted the Health Department to delay testing of proposed sites for sewage disposal systems. Maryland sewage disposal and subdivision regulations require certain soil-percolation and other tests to be conducted when the water table in the sewage disposal area is expected to be at its highest level. Levels usually are at their highest between Feb. 1 and April 30. Current data indicates that ground water levels are below normal.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,Frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
All this rain has ended the drought for farmers, and water tables are rising again. But we are not quite back to normal. The USGS says more than 60 percent of Maryland's monitoring wells remain below seasonal norms. If the rain keeps up, hydrologist Wendy McPherson expects groundwater will keep rising: "P erhaps most of the water levels will be normal by the end of the month."
NEWS
December 17, 2003
Man tries to rob store, hits clerk before fleeing A man tried to rob a Hampstead store yesterday afternoon, claiming he had a gun and punching a clerk before he ran off without cash, Maryland State Police reported. Police said the man entered the Family Dollar Store in the 2300 block of Hanover Pike about 3 p.m. He pushed an object against the cashier's back, said he had a gun and told the cashier not to turn around. The cashier began to turn and the would-be robber hit her in the face, police said.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
Carroll Lutheran Village selects 2 new trustees The Carroll Lutheran Village board of trustees recently had elections and welcomed two new members. Re-elected to a second three-year term were: R. Wayne Barnes, president of Barnes-Bollinger Insurance; and Thomas J. Zirpoli, president and chief executive officer of Target Community & Educational Services and a Western Maryland College professor. Newly elected to the board were: Ann H. Deming, former bookkeeper and village resident; Marion Suski, multimedia developer for Bell Atlantic and Friends of the Village vice president; and Arthur Steven Wisner, treasurer/ director of financial services at WMC. Two ex officio board members are the Rev. Eugene Alexander, pastor of Holy Spirit Lutheran Church and dean of the Westminster Conference of the Delaware/Maryland Synod, and William Richards, president of the Resident Association Council of the Village.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
Impacts after Wednesday night's heavy winds and rain remain widespread around the region, with several roads remaining closed and rivers yet to crest and a wind advisory in effect. In Montgomery County, the flooding required several rescues, and in Laurel, a woman drowned in the high waters. A body was found floating in the water near Fort Meade and Laurel Race Track roads, in a low-lying wooded area nearthe Patuxent River and Laurel Park race track where homeless people camp overnight, Anne Arundel County police said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
About two inches of rain are expected to fall on the soaked Baltimore region Tuesday morning, and sustained winds could topple more trees as Sandy plods north, forecasters said. Although the brunt of the massive storm pelted the area overnight, the slow-moving system will continue to dump rain throughout the morning, said Kevin Witt, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. "It's going to stay on the wet and windy side the rest of the day," Witt said. Water levels in eastern Baltimore County are expected to rise four feet above normal levels due to a storm surge, county officials said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
- The beeping and rumbling of backhoes shoveling sand and debris replaced the howl of Hurricane Sandy's winds as cleanup from the storm began Tuesday, though higher than normal tides continued to threaten some areas with further damage. The storm's impact was evident across the resort town, with some lingering floodwaters along Assawoman Bay and sand, seaweed and pieces of wood littering the ground from which water already receded. Beaches eroded significantly, narrowed to only a few dozen yards in some areas.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Most people throw out a jug of milk after a week or so. The oldest bottle of wine, on the other hand, is the most savored. But what about water? Some of what comes out of faucets in Annapolis, Leonardtown or Easton, it turns out, is older than the finest vintage — and the practice of dairy farming itself. Glaciers that melted more than two million years ago deposited layers of sediment around what is now the Chesapeake Bay. Underground rivers run between those layers, tapped by wells and recharged by rainfall over time.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 16, 2010
High water from the weekend rainstorm appeared to be cresting Monday without posing major threats to flood-prone locations along the Potomac and Susquehanna rivers. The partial failure of a wooden inlet lock along the C&O Canal five miles west of Washington prompted alerts to businesses along the canal where it enters the District of Columbia. Lock 5, at the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, was designed to feed water from the Potomac into the canal, according to park spokesman Bill Spinrad.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,Frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
All this rain has ended the drought for farmers, and water tables are rising again. But we are not quite back to normal. The USGS says more than 60 percent of Maryland's monitoring wells remain below seasonal norms. If the rain keeps up, hydrologist Wendy McPherson expects groundwater will keep rising: "P erhaps most of the water levels will be normal by the end of the month."
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
Anne Arundel County officials have instituted voluntary restrictions on indoor water usage on the Mayo Peninsula after recent heavy rainfall overwhelmed the area's sewage treatment plant. About 10,000 gallons of partially treated sewage have overflowed from the Mayo Wastewater Treatment Plant, prompting the county Health Department to close Bear Neck and Whitemarsh creeks. Health officials also warned yesterday of higher bacteria levels throughout all of the county's creeks and other waterways, caused by increased storm runoff from a five-day series of storms that ended Wednesday.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
As persistent dry conditions have led several Carroll County municipalities to enact voluntary water restrictions, Mount Airy could go one step further to temporarily ban the use of outdoor sprinklers as soon as this week, Mayor Frank Johnson said. Mount Airy officials recently unveiled a tiered system for phasing in possible water restrictions that could last until Sept. 15 and delay new water and sewer connections from being established before that date, Johnson said. "Usage is inching up as the drought continues," Johnson said.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
Anne Arundel County officials have instituted voluntary restrictions on indoor water usage on the Mayo Peninsula after recent heavy rainfall overwhelmed the area's sewage treatment plant. About 10,000 gallons of partially treated sewage have overflowed from the Mayo Wastewater Treatment Plant, prompting the county Health Department to close Bear Neck and Whitemarsh creeks. Health officials also warned yesterday of higher bacteria levels throughout all of the county's creeks and other waterways, caused by increased storm runoff from a five-day series of storms that ended Wednesday.
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