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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
With about 60 gallons of lemonade sold in six hours and more people jumping in line, Kent Harvin's stand at Artscape this year kept busy as attendees tried to stay cool. "It's really hot," said Harvin, a six-year Artscape veteran vendor, selling blue raspberry, pink lemonade and pina colada flavors of water ice at "Big Daddy's Water Ice" stand. "A lot of folks wait until the afternoon when it cools off. " By 4 p.m., people packed Charles Street in between booths at the annual art festival, but it wasn't much cooler.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Scientists, including members of two Maryland-based teams, believe they have found ice inside craters near Mercury's poles, a discovery they say could reveal more about the "building blocks" for life on other planets. Though the small planet is closest to the sun, Mercury rotates nearly upright, meaning some areas on its poles never see sunlight. Using evidence of reflectivity, surface temperatures and the presence of excess hydrogen gathered by NASA's Messenger spacecraft, the scientists have concluded that there are deposits of ice and other organic material accumulated in dark areas of Mercury's surface.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 22, 1992
Alongside the kitchen telephone was a piece of paper headed by the phrase "Emergency Numbers." In that pre-911 era of 30 years ago, my family dutifully listed the Northern District police, the Fire Department and their favorite ice cream makers.After all, what could be a bigger emergency on a warm summer evening that an unsatisfied hankering for a dish of Horn & Horn's coffee ice cream?This was a time when Baltimore actually had real and vigorous ice cream competition. The stuff was all local, made in neighborhoods, and generally not sold any farther west than the Enchanted Forest or farther east than Middle River.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2012
Public safety workers toiled in record-breaking heat in Baltimore and around the region Saturday to help vulnerable residents regroup as Maryland attempted to return to normal life after a devastating series of weather events. Baltimore's high temperature was 104 degrees Saturday — the highest on record for the date — and the state confirmed that its 10th heat-related death of the season had taken place a day earlier. Streets were empty, and most of those who lost electricity in a powerful storm last weekend were back online.
FEATURES
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
Pick a sense, any sense, and the boardwalk in Ocean City will fill it up - whether it's the smell of caramel corn, the sight of a spinning Ferris wheel, the taste of salt water taffy or the feel of hot wood under bare feet. Sounds? There's no shortage of them on the boardwalk, either: a barker beckoning you to a carnival game, the rattle of loose planks when the tram goes by, or snippets of conversations from strolling vacationers - all punctuated by the mad cackling of seagulls hovering above it all. In an hour-long, south-to-north walk one afternoon last week, here is what was heard, proving if nothing else that, on the boardwalk, people-listening is at least as interesting as people-watching: Are you going on the tram, or not?
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
The search for life on other worlds can be boiled down to a simple maxim: Follow the water. Life, at least the carbonaceous form we are familiar with, loves water. For the first time, NASA is about to land a spacecraft in a place on another planet where scientists are confident that water exists. The Phoenix lander is set to blast off from Cape Canaveral early tomorrow for a journey to near the Martian north pole. Once there, it will extend a 7-foot-long robotic arm to dig to a layer of ice thought to lie just beneath the surface.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Scientists, including members of two Maryland-based teams, believe they have found ice inside craters near Mercury's poles, a discovery they say could reveal more about the "building blocks" for life on other planets. Though the small planet is closest to the sun, Mercury rotates nearly upright, meaning some areas on its poles never see sunlight. Using evidence of reflectivity, surface temperatures and the presence of excess hydrogen gathered by NASA's Messenger spacecraft, the scientists have concluded that there are deposits of ice and other organic material accumulated in dark areas of Mercury's surface.
NEWS
February 9, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks has closed the Quiet Waters Park ice rink for the rest of the season due to mechanical problems.Those with skating passbooks should present them to the park's visitors center for refunds. The county will pay $3.25 for each unused coupon. Visitors center hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.Information: 222-1777.Eastport Terrace fire destroys an apartmentA two-alarm fire destroyed one apartment and caused smoke damage to two others in the Eastport Terrace complex yesterday afternoon, fire officials said.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Ice-skaters will be able to return to Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis tomorrow when the outdoor rink there reopens after being closed for two seasons.Workers are putting the final touches on a rink with portable coolant tubing installed over the original in-ground system that failed in December 1993.The county government installed the temporary system for $265,000.The tubing mats can be removed and stored at the end of each season, similar to the system used at Rash Field at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Comet Tempel 1, little more than a fuzzy spot of light in astronomers' telescopes, has turned out to be a complex little world whose surface has the consistency of dry powder snow. Scientists poring over data sent back by NASA's Deep Impact last July told colleagues yesterday that the comet is also unexpectedly active, belching clouds of water vapor and carbon dioxide into space as often as once a week. A science team, led by University of Maryland professor Michael A'Hearn, has just begun to plumb the voluminous data sent back by the spacecraft and the 820-pound "impactor" it dropped into the path of the speeding comet on Independence Day. "There's more than enough to keep us busy until well after I retire," said A'hearn, 64, at the 207th meeting of the American Astronomic Society.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
With about 60 gallons of lemonade sold in six hours and more people jumping in line, Kent Harvin's stand at Artscape this year kept busy as attendees tried to stay cool. "It's really hot," said Harvin, a six-year Artscape veteran vendor, selling blue raspberry, pink lemonade and pina colada flavors of water ice at "Big Daddy's Water Ice" stand. "A lot of folks wait until the afternoon when it cools off. " By 4 p.m., people packed Charles Street in between booths at the annual art festival, but it wasn't much cooler.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
The last time NASA sent people to the moon, they landed somewhere near the moon's equator. It was simpler to get home from there and safer for those early missions. But as NASA plans to return astronauts to the moon in the coming decades, it is the moon's north and south poles that scientists and engineers are aiming for - drawn by the prospect of perpetual sunlight, water ice, intriguing geology and a gentler environment. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab will help the agency prepare for those missions.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
The search for life on other worlds can be boiled down to a simple maxim: Follow the water. Life, at least the carbonaceous form we are familiar with, loves water. For the first time, NASA is about to land a spacecraft in a place on another planet where scientists are confident that water exists. The Phoenix lander is set to blast off from Cape Canaveral early tomorrow for a journey to near the Martian north pole. Once there, it will extend a 7-foot-long robotic arm to dig to a layer of ice thought to lie just beneath the surface.
FEATURES
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
Pick a sense, any sense, and the boardwalk in Ocean City will fill it up - whether it's the smell of caramel corn, the sight of a spinning Ferris wheel, the taste of salt water taffy or the feel of hot wood under bare feet. Sounds? There's no shortage of them on the boardwalk, either: a barker beckoning you to a carnival game, the rattle of loose planks when the tram goes by, or snippets of conversations from strolling vacationers - all punctuated by the mad cackling of seagulls hovering above it all. In an hour-long, south-to-north walk one afternoon last week, here is what was heard, proving if nothing else that, on the boardwalk, people-listening is at least as interesting as people-watching: Are you going on the tram, or not?
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Comet Tempel 1, little more than a fuzzy spot of light in astronomers' telescopes, has turned out to be a complex little world whose surface has the consistency of dry powder snow. Scientists poring over data sent back by NASA's Deep Impact last July told colleagues yesterday that the comet is also unexpectedly active, belching clouds of water vapor and carbon dioxide into space as often as once a week. A science team, led by University of Maryland professor Michael A'Hearn, has just begun to plumb the voluminous data sent back by the spacecraft and the 820-pound "impactor" it dropped into the path of the speeding comet on Independence Day. "There's more than enough to keep us busy until well after I retire," said A'hearn, 64, at the 207th meeting of the American Astronomic Society.
NEWS
By Jennifer Rubell and Jennifer Rubell,Tribune Media Services | July 18, 2004
Martha Stewart kept a few bottles of it on the defense table during her federal trial in New York. Ben Affleck drank it during an interview with Playboy. Teen-agers gulp it out of giant bottles with trippy graphics. And ladies-who-lunch sip it out of crystal glasses with a slice of lemon. Yes, we're talking about iced tea, the unofficial drink of summer. Around the country, iced tea is all the rage. According to Joe Simrany, president of the Tea Association of the U.S.A., Americans spent $2 billion on ready-to-drink iced tea last year, 10 times more than we spent in 1990.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
The last time NASA sent people to the moon, they landed somewhere near the moon's equator. It was simpler to get home from there and safer for those early missions. But as NASA plans to return astronauts to the moon in the coming decades, it is the moon's north and south poles that scientists and engineers are aiming for - drawn by the prospect of perpetual sunlight, water ice, intriguing geology and a gentler environment. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab will help the agency prepare for those missions.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2012
Public safety workers toiled in record-breaking heat in Baltimore and around the region Saturday to help vulnerable residents regroup as Maryland attempted to return to normal life after a devastating series of weather events. Baltimore's high temperature was 104 degrees Saturday — the highest on record for the date — and the state confirmed that its 10th heat-related death of the season had taken place a day earlier. Streets were empty, and most of those who lost electricity in a powerful storm last weekend were back online.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Ice-skaters will be able to return to Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis tomorrow when the outdoor rink there reopens after being closed for two seasons.Workers are putting the final touches on a rink with portable coolant tubing installed over the original in-ground system that failed in December 1993.The county government installed the temporary system for $265,000.The tubing mats can be removed and stored at the end of each season, similar to the system used at Rash Field at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
County officials and a contractor are still trying to decide what is causing pipes under the ice skating rink at Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis to corrode and leak.In the meantime, the county is taking steps to ensure that repairs will be made and skaters will not be iceless next winter.The rink, which attracts as many as 1,000 people a day during the holidays, was ordered closed in December, less than a week after the skating season began.Several leaks were detected in the nearly two miles of pipes embedded an inch under the pond's concrete foundation that carry pressurized Freon to chill the ice. The leaks dropped the pressure of the refrigerant and kept it from flowing safely in the pipes.
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