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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
Delmar Farms in Fallston looks like any number of the upscale subdivisions that cover the Baltimore suburbs. Large brick-faced houses rise out of a one-time farm field. Sport utility vehicles and basketball hoops mark the driveways. Signs welcome buyers looking for "two-acre estate homes," which cost between $641,900 and $738,900. But the builder and residents of the 33-home development are facing a potential problem unfamiliar to other subdivisions in the area: the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
NEW YORK - When rabbis in Brooklyn spotted a tiny crustacean swimming in the tap water last spring, the ensuing debate about whether it rendered the city's water unkosher seemed like an amusing, but esoteric dispute in a particularly exacting Jewish enclave. However, in the months since, the discovery has changed the daily lives of tens of thousands of Orthodox Jews across the city. Plumbers in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens have been summoned to install water filters - some costing more than $1,000 - and dozens of restaurants have posted signs in their windows trumpeting that they filter their water.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
NEW YORK - When rabbis in Brooklyn spotted a tiny crustacean swimming in the tap water last spring, the ensuing debate about whether it rendered the city's water unkosher seemed like an amusing, but esoteric dispute in a particularly exacting Jewish enclave. However, in the months since, the discovery has changed the daily lives of tens of thousands of Orthodox Jews across the city. Plumbers in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens have been summoned to install water filters - some costing more than $1,000 - and dozens of restaurants have posted signs in their windows trumpeting that they filter their water.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
Delmar Farms in Fallston looks like any number of the upscale subdivisions that cover the Baltimore suburbs. Large brick-faced houses rise out of a one-time farm field. Sport utility vehicles and basketball hoops mark the driveways. Signs welcome buyers looking for "two-acre estate homes," which cost between $641,900 and $738,900. But the builder and residents of the 33-home development are facing a potential problem unfamiliar to other subdivisions in the area: the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
At least seven households near Hampstead will have their private well water filtered at state expense while officials seeks the source of a suspected gasoline additive leak that has contaminated wells in about two dozen homes nearby. Residents of the Hillcrest Avenue neighborhood, just east of the Carroll County town's boundary, and Hampstead officials were told this year that water samples taken by the county Health Department last year contained the potentially carcinogenic additive MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether)
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
At least seven households near Hampstead will have their private well water filtered at state expense while officials seeks the source of a suspected gasoline additive leak that has contaminated wells in about two dozen homes nearby. Residents of the Hillcrest Avenue neighborhood, just east of the Carroll County town's boundary, and Hampstead officials were told this year that water samples taken by the county Health Department last year contained the potentially carcinogenic additive MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether)
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
At least seven households near Hampstead will have their private well water filtered at state expense while officials seeks the source of a suspected gasoline additive leak that has contaminated wells in about two dozen homes nearby. Residents of the Hillcrest Avenue neighborhood, just east of the Carroll County town's boundary, and Hampstead officials were told this year that water samples taken by the county Health Department last year contained the potentially carcinogenic additive MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether)
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
When it rains, the water races down the camp's paved road -- picking up the trail of pollutants in its way -- and pours through a giant pipe until it is dumped into the defenseless Severn River. It's a poor lesson in doing what is good for the environment for the 26,000 students a year who visit Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. Yesterday -- with the help of 92 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade campers from throughout Anne Arundel County and two grownups the kids gleefully called "The Bog Men" -- the cleanup began with the construction of a wetland bog where the drainage pipe used to be. The bog -- a pond surrounded by sandy soil and peat moss, and nourished with carnivorous pitcher plants, rare Atlantic white cedar trees, blue flag irises and more -- acts like the filter in an aquarium, with each part working to remove the oil and nitrogen and more before runoff enters the Chesapeake Bay. Now there's a new lesson to be taught.
NEWS
August 3, 2008
Rotary International has awarded a $17,000 matching grant to the Rotary Clubs of Greater Severna Park and Nairobi Industrial in Kenya to provide a Kenyan primary school with furniture, sports equipment, uniforms, health camps and a 2,500-gallon water tank for collecting rainwater. Kenya Connect, a nonprofit based in Silver Spring, is assisting the Rotarians. Kenya Connect has raised over $117,000 through the efforts of schoolchildren in the United States, resulting in water tanks, classroom renovations, solar-powered learning resource centers, fences, uniforms and sports equipment for impoverished schools in Wamunyu, Kenya.
NEWS
March 8, 1992
The Harford County Joint Narcotics Task force seized 30 pounds of marijuana, worth $66,000, about $11,000 cash and 4 ounces of psilocybin, or psychedelic mushrooms, in separate raids in Harford and Baltimore counties, police said last week.DeWayne Curry, a spokesman for the Harford County Sheriff's Office, said his department raided two homes on Redfield Road in Bel Air Feb. 24.The announcement of the seizures was delayed pending a March 2 raid in Baltimore County carried out by state police.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
At least seven households near Hampstead will have their private well water filtered at state expense while officials seeks the source of a suspected gasoline additive leak that has contaminated wells in about two dozen homes nearby. Residents of the Hillcrest Avenue neighborhood, just east of the Carroll County town's boundary, and Hampstead officials were told this year that water samples taken by the county Health Department last year contained the potentially carcinogenic additive MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether)
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
At least seven households near Hampstead will have their private well water filtered at state expense while officials seeks the source of a suspected gasoline additive leak that has contaminated wells in about two dozen homes nearby. Residents of the Hillcrest Avenue neighborhood, just east of the Carroll County town's boundary, and Hampstead officials were told this year that water samples taken by the county Health Department last year contained the potentially carcinogenic additive MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether)
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
At least seven households near Hampstead will have their private well water filtered at state expense while officials seeks the source of a suspected gasoline additive leak that has contaminated wells in about two dozen homes nearby. Residents of the Hillcrest Avenue neighborhood, just east of the Carroll County town's boundary, and Hampstead officials were told this year that water samples taken by the county Health Department last year contained the potentially carcinogenic additive MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether)
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
When it rains, the water races down the camp's paved road -- picking up the trail of pollutants in its way -- and pours through a giant pipe until it is dumped into the defenseless Severn River. It's a poor lesson in doing what is good for the environment for the 26,000 students a year who visit Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. Yesterday -- with the help of 92 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade campers from throughout Anne Arundel County and two grownups the kids gleefully called "The Bog Men" -- the cleanup began with the construction of a wetland bog where the drainage pipe used to be. The bog -- a pond surrounded by sandy soil and peat moss, and nourished with carnivorous pitcher plants, rare Atlantic white cedar trees, blue flag irises and more -- acts like the filter in an aquarium, with each part working to remove the oil and nitrogen and more before runoff enters the Chesapeake Bay. Now there's a new lesson to be taught.
NEWS
May 10, 1997
WHEN THE Army Corps of Engineers gave Maryland the authority last year to decide on permits for wetlands destruction, there was much celebration of streamlining the regulatory process.Now, five environmental groups have served official notice they will sue the federal government for delegating that blanket authority, charging that the move "will cause tremendous harm to Maryland wetlands and waters."They claim that Maryland approves 90 percent of wetlands-loss permits without even a public hearing, that enforcement is lax and the inspection effort by the Department of the Environment has declined.
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