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Water Damage

BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | December 19, 1993
Most tenants do not realize they need renters insurance until it's too late.Some examples of cases when insurance would have come in handy:* The upstairs tenant caused a water overflow, which damaged furniture and clothing. While the negligent tenant may be sued, it's easier for an insurance company to handle the situation.* A rainstorm caused the county storm sewer system to back up, flooding basement apartments. Not only is there damage to the tenants' property, but they have to go to a motel while their apartment is repaired.
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NEWS
By Joanne Wasserman and Joanne Wasserman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 27, 2001
NEW YORK - Water-damaged ceilings. Exposed wiring. Chipped paint. Corroded woodwork. City Hall, one of New York's most ornate, beautiful and historic buildings, is clearly getting a little shabby around the edges. Two water stains and corroded woodwork directly over the entrances mar the 189-year-old building's beauty the moment a visitor walks inside. An old rug in the visitor's balcony above the City Council chamber, where everyone from tourists to schoolchildren watches government at work, is so badly ripped and buckled that an elderly woman tripped six months ago and broke her ankle, City Hall police acknowledged.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
After dragging his golf clubs and luggage off a shuttle bus in long-term parking near BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport on Wednesday afternoon, Leroy Donahue took several quick strides over to his shiny black Tesla Model S and peered through the window. The 77-year-old Arlington, Va., resident then circled his pricey high-tech electric car and, opening the hatchback, watched as water poured out. "Yep," he said, nodding to his travel buddy, Alain Labeau of Potomac. Just as he had suspected, his car - just 14 months old and still parked where he left it before heading off on a golf trip to Maine - had not been spared by the record-setting rainfall that dropped more than 6 inches on the airport and more than 10 inches on other parts of the region on Tuesday, leaving vehicles flooded in lots and on roadways all over.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
I have been reading with profound amazement, the opinions of the Republican voters in The Sun. For a group of humans that, as a party, nearly destroyed the United States to be upset with the current administration's handling of this crisis is remarkable. The Republicans under George W. Bush set fire to the barn and ran like arsonists. In came the new fire chief, Barack Obama, and he put out the fire. The barn had a lot of smoke and water damage, but it was fixable. So Chief Obama set out to rebuild.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
A two-alarm fire destroyed two apartments and damaged three others in Columbia on Wednesday morning, displacing two adults and two children, according to the Howard County Department of Fire & Rescue Services. Firefighters responded to the 7600 block of Woodpark Drive about 10 a.m. after a maintenance worker discovered a fire in a second-floor apartment after responding to reports of water leaking into an apartment below, said Battalion Chief Eric Proctor, a department spokesman. Finding heavy smoke coming from the apartment, officials requested a second alarm and began battling the blaze, which had been controlled by an activated sprinkler system, Proctor said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
An order by a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge has cleared the way for a lender to foreclose on the Jefferson Building, where work on a planned Staybridge Suites Hotel stalled during the financial downturn. RL BB Financial LLC had been prevented from foreclosing on the former office building after the developer filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in August 2010. An order Tuesday by Judge Nancy V. Alquist lifted a stay preventing a sale. The developer, 101 Charles Street LLC, completed about half the renovations, the order says.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
A house fire in Anne Arundel County sent two people to the hospital Saturday morning and took 60 fire personnel from four departments half an hour to bring under control, fire officials said. The fire in the 900 block of Malvern Hill Drive in Davidsonville was reported at around 7 a.m. Saturday, Anne Arundel County Fire Department spokesman Michael Pfaltzgraff said. When firefighters arrived they found fire and smoke billowing from the basement, he added. The responding unit called a second alarm, and firefighters from the Annapolis, U.S. Naval Academy and Prince George's County fire departments responded to the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Pabu Izakaya, an Asian restaurant in Harbor East's Four Seasons Hotel, plans to reopen next week after being closed since late January because of water damage. Audrey Slade, director of public relations for Baltimore's Four Seasons Hotel, said the restaurant will reopen with a party on the evening of March 7. Normal service will resume on March 8. Slade said the damage was caused by a burst pipe brought on by the recent cold weather. The restaurant originally hoped to reopen in to seven to 10 days, but the repairs took longer than expected.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
Commuters to Baltimore are likely to face heavy traffic and major delays Tuesday, after a large water main break downtown buckled the surface of Light Street and sent water gushing through Lombard and Pratt streets. Jamie Kendrick, the city's deputy transportation director, advised commuters to "think ahead, plan ahead, [and] use alternate routes" Tuesday, including Metro and light rail. "We've got a lot to find out once we've got the water shut off," Kendrick said. "This is going to be a couple of days' worth of work.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2002
Last year, Congress passed a law that allows older workers to make "catch up" contributions to their retirement accounts. I am over 50 and wanted to put $12,000 into my 401(k) this year - the $11,000 maximum the law allows most employees, plus the $1,000 catch-up contribution. But I'm not being allowed to do so. My employer, a large international company, is telling me that no one can figure out how to implement the law. Did Congress and President Bush pass a meaningless law? Please help clarify this bizarre twist.
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