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By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | January 28, 2007
Though a hot real estate market created a budget surplus in previous years, softening revenues, rising construction costs and the expense of securing water resources could strain the Carroll County budget next year, county budget director Ted Zaleski said. Zaleski warned that capital projects, even those on the county's six-year plan, might be slashed. He and analysts are preparing to unveil a budget for fiscal year 2008 in March. Construction projects that are funded create millions of dollars in operating costs, consuming additional funds, Zaleski added.
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NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2010
Gabrielle "Gabby" Kozera, 17, imagines the continent of Africa in the shape of the human heart, with clean water as the lifeblood of its many struggling nations. As she began her senior year at Maryvale Preparatory School in Brooklandville, she launched her Water = Heart project with the goal of raising $4,600, the cost of drilling a community well for a village in Kenya. "This one resource that we in America consider our right is often not even a basic in Africa," she said. "My church already sponsors a 'Wells in Africa' program, so I thought, 'Why can't I do that?
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1999
As the heat wave continues and reservoir levels drop, water pressure is low and tempers are frayed in South Carroll.For the third consecutive year, residents of the county's most populated area are coping with water restrictions brought on by heat, dry weather and high demand. Many attribute water shortages to the county's poor planning, which has allowed development to continue."I am sure they are not telling people buying all these expensive new houses that they might not have water," said Carolyn Fairbank of Eldersburg.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 2007
A Western drought that began in 1999 has continued after the respite of a couple of wet years that now feel like a cruel tease. But this time people in the driest states are not just scanning the skies and hoping for meteorological rescue. About $2.5 billion in water projects are planned or under way in four states, the biggest expansion in the West's quest for water in decades. Among them is a proposed 280-mile pipeline that would direct water to Las Vegas from northern Nevada. A proposed reservoir just north of the California-Mexico border would correct an inefficient delivery system that lets excess water pass to Mexico.
NEWS
August 6, 1999
THE GOOD NEWS is that Baltimore's three great reservoirs are more than half full. The bad news is that they are nearly half empty. The really bad news is that state and city officials who should cooperate and exchange expertise in the public interest were bickering and threatening lawsuits, thoroughly confusing the public. But now the really good news is that Baltimore's public works director, George G. Balog, is planning to tap the Susquehanna River for water Monday, just as Gov. Parris N. Glendening had ordered.
NEWS
By PETER HONEY | March 31, 1991
Washington.--It has brought Syria, Iraq and Turkey to the brink of armed conflict. Historians have found it in the roots of Israel's six-day war with the Arabs. Jordan's King Hussein said last July that it alone could drive him back to war. And Iraqi President Saddam Hussein tried unsuccessfully to use it as a weapon in the Persian Gulf war.The focus, for once, is not on oil or boundary lines or political rights or tribal rivalry or religious persecution, but on one of the most fundamental of human needs -- water.
NEWS
September 16, 2001
Commissioners plan for water plant to fail We have all heard the term "planned obsolescence." It is one of the means vehicle manufacturers use to get people to buy new cars and trucks. During this current state of mismanagement by the Carroll County Board of Commissioners, the term is taking on new meaning as it applies to the vintage water treatment plant which the County maintains on Liberty Reservoir. Never before have I seen a county manager resort to blackmailing citizens and a town as the County Department of Public Works is currently attempting by using the lame excuse of aging equipment to promote the development of Piney Run Lake as the sole means of averting a water crisis in South Carroll in 2002.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2010
Gabrielle "Gabby" Kozera, 17, imagines the continent of Africa in the shape of the human heart, with clean water as the lifeblood of its many struggling nations. As she began her senior year at Maryvale Preparatory School in Brooklandville, she launched her Water = Heart project with the goal of raising $4,600, the cost of drilling a community well for a village in Kenya. "This one resource that we in America consider our right is often not even a basic in Africa," she said. "My church already sponsors a 'Wells in Africa' program, so I thought, 'Why can't I do that?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 4, 1993
A new federal government study on the possible effects of global warming in the Southwest warns of dramatic reductions in hydroelectric power generation, severe water shortages for Arizona cities, widespread crop damage in Southern California and northern Mexico and the degradation of fish and wildlife habitat from Colorado to the Mexican border.Released yesterday, the study, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and conducted by the Pacific Institute in Oakland, Calif., focuses on the effects of temperature increases of 2 to 4 degrees Celsius in the Colorado River Basin, an area covering parts of seven states and northern Mexico.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun Reporter] | February 18, 2007
Carroll County officials have asked the county's Environmental Advisory Council to launch a water conservation effort and are working to form a water task force, two plans that grew out of a countywide water summit. The conservation campaign should seek ways to recycle wastewater and promote low water-use fixtures and environmentally sensitive landscaping and gardening techniques, county officials said. The effort comes as Westminster officials are hoping to resolve by the end of the month a water deficit that has shut down development in the county seat, Mayor Thomas K. Ferguson said.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun Reporter] | February 18, 2007
Carroll County officials have asked the county's Environmental Advisory Council to launch a water conservation effort and are working to form a water task force, two plans that grew out of a countywide water summit. The conservation campaign should seek ways to recycle wastewater and promote low water-use fixtures and environmentally sensitive landscaping and gardening techniques, county officials said. The effort comes as Westminster officials are hoping to resolve by the end of the month a water deficit that has shut down development in the county seat, Mayor Thomas K. Ferguson said.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | January 28, 2007
Though a hot real estate market created a budget surplus in previous years, softening revenues, rising construction costs and the expense of securing water resources could strain the Carroll County budget next year, county budget director Ted Zaleski said. Zaleski warned that capital projects, even those on the county's six-year plan, might be slashed. He and analysts are preparing to unveil a budget for fiscal year 2008 in March. Construction projects that are funded create millions of dollars in operating costs, consuming additional funds, Zaleski added.
NEWS
September 16, 2001
Commissioners plan for water plant to fail We have all heard the term "planned obsolescence." It is one of the means vehicle manufacturers use to get people to buy new cars and trucks. During this current state of mismanagement by the Carroll County Board of Commissioners, the term is taking on new meaning as it applies to the vintage water treatment plant which the County maintains on Liberty Reservoir. Never before have I seen a county manager resort to blackmailing citizens and a town as the County Department of Public Works is currently attempting by using the lame excuse of aging equipment to promote the development of Piney Run Lake as the sole means of averting a water crisis in South Carroll in 2002.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and By Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
South Carroll will have a severe water shortage by the beginning of next summer, with demand so much greater than supply, county officials say, that they are certain they'll be forced to impose restrictions. "I don't have water for next year," said Doug Myers, Carroll's director of public works. "You can't get blood out of a turnip. Something has to be done. The only option now is no more building and South Carroll living constantly with a water ban. There will be bans on like 1999, only longer and stricter."
NEWS
August 6, 1999
THE GOOD NEWS is that Baltimore's three great reservoirs are more than half full. The bad news is that they are nearly half empty. The really bad news is that state and city officials who should cooperate and exchange expertise in the public interest were bickering and threatening lawsuits, thoroughly confusing the public. But now the really good news is that Baltimore's public works director, George G. Balog, is planning to tap the Susquehanna River for water Monday, just as Gov. Parris N. Glendening had ordered.
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