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Water Contamination

NEWS
January 13, 1995
The Maryland Department of the Environment has given the county the go-ahead for an expansion and redesign of the last sections of the county landfill near Millersville.The state agency rejected two challenges from neighbors who said the landfill's troubled history indicated the county could not be trusted to run the property. The permit was issued Dec. 22.MDE did not remove the complaint and order under which the landfill has been operating for two years. The county still has to cap the old cells, excavate part of one trash cell and fix problems that have cause ground water contamination.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Planned for 15 years, the county's first landfill park is just about finished -- with one nagging exception.The Alpha Ridge Community Park, on about 72 acres on the northern edge of the 590-acre Alpha Ridge Landfill in Marriottsville, has brightly colored, molded-plastic playground equipment, baseball backstops, playing fields, picnic pavilions and tennis and basketball courts. As soon as the grass is well-rooted and the fields are playable, the park will open -- probably next spring.But, said John Byrd, chief of the county Bureau of Parks, the potential for ground-water contamination from the landfill will mean portable chemical toilets in wooden kiosks will be provided instead of flush toilets and sinks with running water.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
New wells drilled into bedrock under the county landfill in Marriottsville have found more solvent-contaminated ground water, a newly formed citizens' committee was told yesterday.The suspected carcinogens, commonly used in grease-cutting, dry cleaning and paint removal, were found in smaller quantities than were discovered a year ago at the first bedrock test well at the Alpha Ridge Landfill.Semiannual tests at residential wells near the landfill by the county Health Department have not produced contaminated water.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
UNION BRIDGE - The County Commissioners conducted a public hearing last night to discuss replacing private wells and septic systems in the Key View Estates development and surrounding homes with a community water system.Well water contamination has been detected in some homes in Keyview Estates because of failing septic systems. The community water system proposed by the county would serve about 43 existing homes, six potential new homes, a church and Francis Scott Key High.The 117-acre service area is between Bark Hill and Middleburg roads on the west side of Raywell Avenue.
NEWS
May 29, 1991
The County Commissioners are considering hiring a consultant to study moving a stream that could undermine the county's effort to cap Hodges Landfill and could carry pollutants to a larger body of water.The closed landfill, off Hodges Road in south Carroll, is one of several abandoned dumps that the Maryland Department of the Environment has ordered be properly sealed to avoid land and water contamination.The stream, which flows near the landfill and feeds Morgan Run, anatural reproductive habitat for trout, could erode a cap on the landfill, said James E. Slater, director of the County Department of Natural Resource Protection, in a meeting with the commissioners.
NEWS
August 4, 1993
Water officials reject bid for second hearingThe Maryland Water Resources Administration has no plans to hold a second hearing on the request of Black & Decker (U.S.) Inc. to pump hundreds of thousands of gallons daily at its Hampstead site, said Terrance W. Clark, chief of the administration's water rights division.The Carroll County commissioners had written to Mr. Clark July 15, calling for a second hearing.On June 15, the Water Resources Administration conducted a hearing in Hampstead on the company's request to pump an average of 432,000 gallons a day of water out of the ground as part of a project to clean up ground-water contamination.
NEWS
By Katherine RichardsStaff Writer | September 3, 1993
A Hampstead dairy farmer asked Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett for help in persuading the Environmental Protection Agency to take action against water contamination stemming from the Black & Decker plant near his farm."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Construction workers have discovered at least 50 drums of a petroleum-based substance at Fort Meade, the largest number federal officials have reported in five years.Preliminary tests show that the 55-gallon drums contained a substance similar to waste oil or diesel fuels. The drums were discovered June 15 off Rock Ave near Route 32. Base officials announced the discovery this week.They said they do not know how long the drums have been at the 50-foot by 100-foot site, which they have fenced off. The drums were buried under about a foot of dirt and had been covered with plastic.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
The Maryland Department of the Environment has ruled out two possible sources of bacteria in the Union Bridge water supply, and the agency now plans to check a suspected sinkhole near the well on Locust Street.Treated water from the well is safe to drink, an MDE spokesman said when tests started in September. But the agency wants to know the source of bacteria in the untreated water.Dye tests showed no infiltration from the town's sewer system, which is "very good news," said John W. Grace, an MDE public health engineer.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
The Maryland Department of the Environment has ruled out two possible sources of bacteria in the Union Bridge water supply, and the agency now plans to check a suspected sinkhole near the well on Locust Street.Treated water from the well is safe to drink, an MDE spokesman said when tests started in September. But the agency wants to know the source of bacteria in the untreated water.Dye tests showed no infiltration from the town's sewer system, which is "very good news," said John W. Grace, an MDE public health engineer.
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