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NEWS
January 7, 2014
Thank you for Tim Wheeler 's article on opposition to the construction of a new natural gas pipeline because of the effects it may have on local water supplies ("Pipeline may affect drinking water, activists fear," Jan. 1). There are other reasons to oppose the building of this pipeline. Natural gas is popular because it is inexpensive and promoted as burning cleaner than coal. However, when one factors in the greenhouse gas effects of methane leaks during drilling and transportation, it may not be cleaner than coal.
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NEWS
January 7, 2014
Thank you for Tim Wheeler 's article on opposition to the construction of a new natural gas pipeline because of the effects it may have on local water supplies ("Pipeline may affect drinking water, activists fear," Jan. 1). There are other reasons to oppose the building of this pipeline. Natural gas is popular because it is inexpensive and promoted as burning cleaner than coal. However, when one factors in the greenhouse gas effects of methane leaks during drilling and transportation, it may not be cleaner than coal.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
At the dairy farm next door, some of Stuart Leister's cows have mysteriously fallen ill. Just down Hanover Pike, workers at Jos. A. Bank Clothiers have been told not to drink the tap water. And behind Jos. Bank, on property his family has owned since 1928, 33-year-old Derrick Garland says the fish that once swam in his stream have disappeared."There's no fish in the stream anymore except crawfish," says Mr. Garland, who works for an air conditioning and refrigeration concern. "The company just keeps trying to sweep all of this under the rug."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 24, 2013
A new study finds residential wells more likely to be contaminated when near drilling for natural gas using hydraulic fracturing. Researchers led by Duke University 's Robert Jackson report that although the vast majority of wells checked in northeastern Pennsylvania and southeastern New York had methane in them, those within one kilometer of gas drilling sites had six times more of the gas, on average, than residential wells farther away....
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1997
The town of Mount Airy has joined residents in their opposition to Shell Oil Co.'s proposal to build a gas station and carwash south of the Interstate 70 interchange.The Town Council decided to oppose the station because of concerns of possible water contamination.The site of the proposed station is near the watershed of one of the eight wells that supply Mount Airy's drinking water.The Frederick County Board of Zoning Appeals is scheduled to hear Shell's request for a gas station and carwash on a 0.69-acre site at Route 144 and Lakeview Drive at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 8, 1990
Twelve years have passed since Harmans resident Richard Morehead went to the county health department with a glass of his bright-green well water.Tonight the EPA is having a public hearing on its plan to keep the contamination from spreading.So far, the old 69-foot Morehead well -- which was found to contain arsenic, chrome and copper from the wood processing plant across the street --and a few nearby test wells are the only ones in the area to show contamination. The Environmental Protection Agency lists 17 domestic wells, 13 public supply wells, five commercial wells and one institutional well -- most of them deeper than Morehead's -- within three miles of the Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers plant.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
Manchester officials are studying new ways to preserve town springs as drinking water sources, after several attempts to identify well sites have failed.The town is under a state-imposed order to reduce its dependency on the springs that have supplied 40 percent of the town's drinking water since 1933. Nearly two years ago, state environmental authorities determined that the springs were vulnerable to surface water contamination."We're shifting the emphasis a bit and concentrating on doing spring rehabilitation work to improve the source of the springs," said Manchester Town Manager David Warner.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | May 22, 1991
Residents here are glad the wells of eight homes near the Keystone (Pa.) Landfill were tested last week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, but say the agency's methods could yield errors.Kimmarle A. Traeger of the 700 block of Humbert Schoolhouse Road is one ofthe residents whose water was tested for volatile organic compounds that might be linked to Keystone."I'm hopeful the outcome (of the testing) will be comprehensive,"Traeger said. But in the seven years it has taken the EPA to get this far, she has learned not to expect much, she said.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
Manchester officials are studying new ways to preserve town springs as drinking water sources, after several attempts to identify well sites have failed.The town is under a state-imposed order to reduce its dependency on the springs that have supplied 40 percent of the town's drinking water since 1933. Nearly two years ago, state environmental authorities determined that the springs were vulnerable to surface water contamination."We're shifting the emphasis a bit and concentrating on doing spring rehabilitation work to improve the source of the springs," said Manchester Town Manager David Warner.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Employees who were barred from their offices on the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus because of water contamination have been granted additional paid leave days, human resources officials said Friday. Employees in the campus' south building, which was closed two days, will get two days of added leave, said Pamela Paulk and Charlene Moore Hayes, executives for Hopkins' health system and university, in an email to employees who work at the North Baltimore office complex. "You will be able to use the two days as you wish," the human resources officials said.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Employees who were barred from their offices on the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus because of water contamination have been granted additional paid leave days, human resources officials said Friday. Employees in the campus' south building, which was closed two days, will get two days of added leave, said Pamela Paulk and Charlene Moore Hayes, executives for Hopkins' health system and university, in an email to employees who work at the North Baltimore office complex. "You will be able to use the two days as you wish," the human resources officials said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2007
The state's environmental agency has ordered the operator of a coal ash dump site to pay a "significant" fine and clean contaminated water recently detected in Anne Arundel County. The Maryland Department of the Environment gave BBSS Inc. 60 days to comply or face legal action, agency spokesman Robert Ballinger said yesterday. He did not elaborate on the amount of the fine or specific actions. "Taking this corrective action is how we deem it necessary to take care" of the contamination, Ballinger said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | September 12, 2006
Harford County officials have notified 375 households in Forest Hill that high levels of hazardous gasoline additives have been detected in the groundwater at a former gas station adjacent to an elementary school, where the levels have been rising since spring. The letters, sent Friday, come nearly two months after the state received the results of groundwater testing at Meller's Food Mart, a convenience store and former Sunoco station. The state's delay in notifying the county Health Department could be a violation of Maryland law. In late June, state tests on a monitoring well near the food mart showed the presence of methyl tertiary butyl ether - or MTBE - at more than 10,000 parts per billion, well above the threshold that requires corrective action.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2002
The new must-have accessory is a bottle of water - for the car, the jogging trail, the classroom or office, the pool or the beach. Whether for its presumed fresher taste, its upscale, health-conscious image or simple convenience, bottled water is making big waves in the beverage business. Americans are happily paying good money for something that was once free and freely taken for granted, creating a multibillion-dollar market for bottled water. And purveyors are asking, if consumers clamor to pay for it, why shouldn't there be more shelf space devoted to pricey H2O?
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2001
Grant Anderson is used to quizzical looks when he tells people he does modeling for a living. But the balding, bespectacled hydrogeologist isn't kidding. For five years, Anderson has been developing ground water models for the Army Corps of Engineers - complex, computer-generated formulas to determine the direction of water flow. The ground water model he's customizing for Fort Meade has been in development for more than a year. "It is a very imperfect tool," Anderson said. "But it is the best tool we have."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson, TaNoah Morgan and Heather Dewar and Neal Thompson, TaNoah Morgan and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dan Thanh Dang contributed to this article | July 23, 1998
Fort Meade, whose recent transformation from atrophied Army base to bustling federal campus has been touted as a success story in the era of military downsizing, was designated as one of the worst pollution sites in America yesterday by the Environmental Protection Agency.Fort Meade officials and the EPA announced that the 80-year-old base had been added to the Superfund list of the nation's most environmentally hazardous sites.At least four contaminated parcels are the culprits, though there may be more, the EPA said.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | October 19, 1997
WATER, water, where it shouldn't be, is a continuing problem for homeowners.A reader who's arranging some home improvements for an elderly friend in Harford County writes:"My friend gets her water from an indoor well. Each time it rains heavily rain water and soil sediment spill out of the pump room onto the main cellar floor. The plumber informs me that the well is in good condition and is made of concrete. However, it was probably not grouted or encased, as the house was built in the early 1950s before this was required.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Frank and Maria DiFatta escaped suburbia for rural Carroll County, where they bought a 142-year-old farmhouse on 30 acres.Shortly after they moved into their home on Leppo Road in August, they learned about water contamination in the Silver Run area -- caused by the Keystone landfill, a quarter-mile over the line in Pennsylvania.Last night, the former Towson couple were among about two dozen residents who attended a meeting in Silver Run about the problems at St. Mary's United Church of Christ, sponsored by People Against Contamination of the Environment Inc.PACE is a non-profit group formed in 1984 to battle environmental problems associated with the landfill.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Where some see the benign image of 200 senior citizens living out their retirement on 58 acres in bucolic western Howard County, others see contaminated ground water and crowded roads.Residents of Glenwood who oppose the Villas at Cattail Creek are expected to turn out in force Saturday at a Board of Appeals hearing on the special exception needed by developer Donald Reuwer -- one of Howard County's most prolific developers -- to build the 116-unit condominium complex for senior citizens.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | October 19, 1997
WATER, water, where it shouldn't be, is a continuing problem for homeowners.A reader who's arranging some home improvements for an elderly friend in Harford County writes:"My friend gets her water from an indoor well. Each time it rains heavily rain water and soil sediment spill out of the pump room onto the main cellar floor. The plumber informs me that the well is in good condition and is made of concrete. However, it was probably not grouted or encased, as the house was built in the early 1950s before this was required.
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