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Water Consumption

NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
Maryland golf course owners have asked the governor to lift his order curbing their water use, saying their businesses will be crippled if it remains in place. In a letter this week to Gov. Parris N. Glendening and state environmental officials, the Maryland Golf Course Owners Association complained that its members were unfairly singled out in being ordered to cut water consumption by 80 percent. Most other state businesses were asked to reduce water use by 10 percent voluntarily.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Remember the drought? Well, it's over. On the day when winter turned to spring -- with flood warnings out and heavy rain washing away the last of February's snow -- Baltimore's public works chief ended mandatory restrictions yesterday on water consumption that had been imposed in August. About 1.8 million water customers in the city and nearby suburbs may wash their cars at home again without worrying about the water police. "I would like to thank our water customers for their efforts in conserving water during this long drought," said Public Works Director George L. Winfield.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 16, 2012
I want to thank Ms. Nina Platt of Homeland for providing me with a copy of her outrageous water bill - and her neighbor's - because, until this happened, I was feeling left out of the Great Baltimore Water Bill Commiseration. It seems like everybody in the city but me has a goofy and outrageous water bill to brag and gripe about. My bill looks normal, boring and puny compared to what I see here: $813.75 due by May 29 for Ms. Platt, who lives alone, and $1,219.06 for the family of four next door.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2004
Concerned about increased use of public water, Carroll County officials are calling for conservation from residents in South Carroll, the county's most populous and largest water service area. Officials want to exercise caution because daily demand for water jumped nearly 400,000 gallons to 2.6 million gallons during the week of May 23, which was unseasonably hot. Despite milder temperatures last week, use has not returned to lower numbers. The county would like to maintain average daily use at about 2.3 million gallons.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2004
Concerned about increased use of public water, Carroll County officials are calling for conservation from residents in South Carroll, the county's most populous and largest water service area. Officials want to exercise caution because daily demand for water jumped nearly 400,000 gallons to 2.6 million gallons during the week of May 23, which was unseasonably hot. Despite milder temperatures last week, usage has not returned to lower numbers. The county would like to maintain average daily use at about 2.3 million gallons.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1999
The scattered showers that fell across the Baltimore area yesterday might have provided a small measure of relief for parched lawns, but they won't cure the drought that's destroying Maryland's crops, or lead to an easing of statewide water restrictions. "The rain did absolutely nothing but increase the humidity," said J. L. Hearn, director of water management at the Maryland Department of the Environment. "To end the drought, we'd need at least 20 inches of rain -- two major tropical storms -- which isn't in the forecast."
NEWS
April 3, 2003
Residents in three northern Anne Arundel County ZIP code areas will face water restrictions starting May 1. The restrictions - which apply to ZIP codes 21226, 21122 and 21060 - are necessary to repair a Baltimore water line that broke last year, said County Executive Janet S. Owens. The city water line supplies water to parts of northern Anne Arundel. The restrictions, which will remain in place indefinitely, will be in effect from 5 p.m. to midnight Monday through Thursday, and all day Friday through Sunday.
NEWS
May 9, 2003
Anne Arundel County has agreed to ease water restrictions on north county residents, Councilman Ronald C. Dillon Jr. announced yesterday. Residents within three ZIP codes - 21122, 21060 and 21226 - will be allowed nonrestrictive water use on Saturdays and Sundays from midnight to 11 a.m. The eased restrictions take effect May 17, Dillon said. Water use has been restricted since May 1. The restrictions will remain in place while repairs are completed on a Baltimore waterline that broke last year.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | November 7, 2009
About 270 dilapidated public housing units will be renovated and equipped with energy-efficient fixtures with $66 million in federal stimulus funds, city officials announced Friday. The money will be used to renovate about 240 individual vacant public housing homes scattered throughout the city and 30 traditional public housing units, officials said. "People are not only committed to making a difference in their communities and transforming their communities, they also want to make sure we are accountable and responsive to them so they can live their lives with their families in a safe environment, in a clean environment, in a stable environment," said Mayor Sheila Dixon in a news conference at a newly renovated home in the Harwood community.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 8, 2012
The Maryland Department of the Environment on Tuesday extended a drought watch to western Maryland and parts of central Maryland. A drought watch was already in effect for the Eastern Shore since April 13. The drought watch includes all of Harford and Carroll counties and parts of Baltimore and Howard counties, as well as Frederick County and points west. It doesn't include areas that get water service through Baltimore city. MDE issues a drought watch when at least two indicators show developing drought conditions.
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