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By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | March 31, 2009
$20 for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3. Rated Mature ** (2 STARS) Of all the comics properties that seem least likely to translate to video games, Watchmen leads the pack. But in the Age of the Inevitable Tie-In, all fans of beloved creations can do is grit their teeth. Now, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and developer Deadline Studios offer Watchmen: The End Is Nigh, a $20 digital release connected to Zack Snyder's big-budget adaptation of Watchmen. What will fans who want to take control of Rorschach and Nite Owl get in the downloadable title?
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
He has used a chain saw to carve intricate wooden sculptures for years, but when Mark Acton won a commission to hew two big new statues by the reservoir in Druid Hill Park, he wasn't sure he could pull it off. His material would be two tree stumps, each more than 12 feet tall and 20 feet around. Both were red oaks, which have especially tough wood. And when he first inspected them, he saw that each had lots of termite damage - the reason the city had cut them down. "'I thought, 'What in the world have I gotten myself into?
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NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | March 13, 2009
A tempest in an inkpot: That's one way of characterizing the mini-eruption over the relative virtues of the movie Watchmen and Brad Bird's 2004 Pixar smash, The Incredibles. Yet the contrast provides an instructive and entertaining demonstration of the difference between a work of art that inspires timeless love and affection and a cult item that begs for disproportionate devotion because of the impact it had on pop culture. Bird's film, a buoyant masterpiece, offers a revisionist view of superheroes without leeching all the levity and ebullience out of the comic-book-film form the way Zack Snyder's movie does.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
This year's stream of escapist extravaganzas has kept crowds coming to the multiplex. But they haven't always left it happy. Watchmen disappointed Alan Moore fans and novices alike with its slavish, dated devotion to the ultimate dirty-hero graphic novel. Inkheart squandered a potential franchise for all ages about the power of reading, while the slick, empty Angels & Demons proved that Tom Hanks' haircut wasn't the only thing wrong with The Da Vinci Code. Monsters Vs. Aliens was so silly-stupid it made some of us wish we were watching a good version of a grisly film like Aliens Vs. Predators.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 6, 2009
The ultimate question raised by the movie version of the celebrated graphic novel Watchmen may not be "Who watches the Watchmen?" but "Who will check their watches during Watchmen?" Ticking in at two hours and 43 minutes, this slavish exercise in revisionist comic-book lore takes more than an hour to get started, and then never gets its scale or proportion right. This is the kind of apocalyptic movie in which murder by meat ax delivers far more punch than a doomsday clock marking the seconds to the end of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
W atchmen arrives in theaters Friday, riding a wave of pop anticipation as fierce in its own way as the return of Star Wars. The reputation of Alan Moore's original creation has been building ever since it appeared in 1986 and helped turn high-class comic books into "graphic novels." Time magazine named it one of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923. It has brought many a grown-up comic-book fan back into the fold and won over collegiate, with-it readers with its apocalyptic tone and its deconstruction of superhero mythology.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 9, 2009
'Watchmen' is No. 1 at weekend box office Watchmen clocked in with $55.7 million in ticket sales to claim the top spot at the box office, making director Zack Snyder's comic book adaptation about a team of twisted superheros the biggest opening of 2009. Still, it was not quite as big as the $70 million take of Snyder's 300 in 2007. Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Watchmen studio Warner Bros., said it was unfair to compare the two films. Many Watchmen enthusiasts raced to IMAX theaters to see Dr. Manhattan and company on the bigger screens.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,Chicago Tribune | September 26, 2005
U.S. and Iraqi soldiers clashed with gunmen loyal to radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr early yesterday, trading fire in a long-running gunbattle that broke nearly a year of calm between U.S. soldiers and militiamen in the Shiite slums of Sadr City. The fighting in the densely populated enclave of eastern Baghdad came on a day that left more than 20 people dead in a series of insurgent attacks across the country. Eight people, including several members of al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia, were killed in the fighting in Sadr City, Iraqi officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2009
Must-sees Race to Witch Mountain: *** A nonstop sci-fi chase involves child aliens (AnnaSophia Robb, Alexander Ludwig) who bring out the combat skills and fatherly virtues of a good-hearted Las Vegas cabbie with useful auto-racing experience (Dwayne Johnson). To ensure the survival of Earth as we know it, this unlikely trio must outmaneuver some grim avengers. Two Lovers: *** 1/2 Joaquin Phoenix, Vinessa Shaw and Gwyneth Paltrow throw their bodies and souls into a love triangle that takes place in Brooklyn, N.Y.'s Slavic-Jewish community of Brighton Beach.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2006
Jermaine Hash insists he doesn't mind being alone inside a closed museum all night. Neither does Allen Cummings, but he allows that, "You do hear sounds in here." "Here" is the Inner Harbor's Maryland Science Center. It's well past midnight on a recent weekday evening, and the two men are describing what it's like to hold one of Baltimore's eeriest jobs: night watchman in an empty, cavernous museum. After all, the night watchmen at New York's Museum of Natural History have to watch over bounding dinosaurs, talking statues, living-history dioramas and restless mummies.
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | March 31, 2009
$20 for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3. Rated Mature ** (2 STARS) Of all the comics properties that seem least likely to translate to video games, Watchmen leads the pack. But in the Age of the Inevitable Tie-In, all fans of beloved creations can do is grit their teeth. Now, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and developer Deadline Studios offer Watchmen: The End Is Nigh, a $20 digital release connected to Zack Snyder's big-budget adaptation of Watchmen. What will fans who want to take control of Rorschach and Nite Owl get in the downloadable title?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2009
Must-sees Race to Witch Mountain: *** A nonstop sci-fi chase involves child aliens (AnnaSophia Robb, Alexander Ludwig) who bring out the combat skills and fatherly virtues of a good-hearted Las Vegas cabbie with useful auto-racing experience (Dwayne Johnson). To ensure the survival of Earth as we know it, this unlikely trio must outmaneuver some grim avengers. Two Lovers: *** 1/2 Joaquin Phoenix, Vinessa Shaw and Gwyneth Paltrow throw their bodies and souls into a love triangle that takes place in Brooklyn, N.Y.'s Slavic-Jewish community of Brighton Beach.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | March 13, 2009
A tempest in an inkpot: That's one way of characterizing the mini-eruption over the relative virtues of the movie Watchmen and Brad Bird's 2004 Pixar smash, The Incredibles. Yet the contrast provides an instructive and entertaining demonstration of the difference between a work of art that inspires timeless love and affection and a cult item that begs for disproportionate devotion because of the impact it had on pop culture. Bird's film, a buoyant masterpiece, offers a revisionist view of superheroes without leeching all the levity and ebullience out of the comic-book-film form the way Zack Snyder's movie does.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 9, 2009
'Watchmen' is No. 1 at weekend box office Watchmen clocked in with $55.7 million in ticket sales to claim the top spot at the box office, making director Zack Snyder's comic book adaptation about a team of twisted superheros the biggest opening of 2009. Still, it was not quite as big as the $70 million take of Snyder's 300 in 2007. Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Watchmen studio Warner Bros., said it was unfair to compare the two films. Many Watchmen enthusiasts raced to IMAX theaters to see Dr. Manhattan and company on the bigger screens.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 6, 2009
The ultimate question raised by the movie version of the celebrated graphic novel Watchmen may not be "Who watches the Watchmen?" but "Who will check their watches during Watchmen?" Ticking in at two hours and 43 minutes, this slavish exercise in revisionist comic-book lore takes more than an hour to get started, and then never gets its scale or proportion right. This is the kind of apocalyptic movie in which murder by meat ax delivers far more punch than a doomsday clock marking the seconds to the end of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
W atchmen arrives in theaters Friday, riding a wave of pop anticipation as fierce in its own way as the return of Star Wars. The reputation of Alan Moore's original creation has been building ever since it appeared in 1986 and helped turn high-class comic books into "graphic novels." Time magazine named it one of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923. It has brought many a grown-up comic-book fan back into the fold and won over collegiate, with-it readers with its apocalyptic tone and its deconstruction of superhero mythology.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 1, 1994
As we prepare to kick back for the long Labor Day weekend, designated to honor the folks who bend their backs to build our homes, highways and skyscrapers and keep our cars, trains and sewers running, it seems appropriate to note that America's workers have become a fashion force.Designers are playing with work wear. Blue-collar clothes, those durable, affordable and utilitarian staples of the rugged laborer, have been rebuilt for pretenders.What do you want to be when you become chic? You can be a fireman, farmer, mechanic, truck driver, engineer, ambulance driver, lumberjack, plumber, construction worker.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The nation mourned two fallen heroes yesterday in an extraordinary outpouring of grief, as thousands of Americans streamed through the Capitol to pay tribute to Jacob J. Chestnut and John M. Gibson.On behalf of "a grateful nation," President Clinton thanked the grieving families of the two federal police officers who were gunned down Friday in the halls of the nation's Capitol. He was joined by Supreme Court justices, Cabinet members, lawmakers and law enforcers -- and Americans from all walks of life.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2006
Jermaine Hash insists he doesn't mind being alone inside a closed museum all night. Neither does Allen Cummings, but he allows that, "You do hear sounds in here." "Here" is the Inner Harbor's Maryland Science Center. It's well past midnight on a recent weekday evening, and the two men are describing what it's like to hold one of Baltimore's eeriest jobs: night watchman in an empty, cavernous museum. After all, the night watchmen at New York's Museum of Natural History have to watch over bounding dinosaurs, talking statues, living-history dioramas and restless mummies.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,Chicago Tribune | September 26, 2005
U.S. and Iraqi soldiers clashed with gunmen loyal to radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr early yesterday, trading fire in a long-running gunbattle that broke nearly a year of calm between U.S. soldiers and militiamen in the Shiite slums of Sadr City. The fighting in the densely populated enclave of eastern Baghdad came on a day that left more than 20 people dead in a series of insurgent attacks across the country. Eight people, including several members of al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia, were killed in the fighting in Sadr City, Iraqi officials said.
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