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NEWS
October 7, 1995
The special section in Wednesday's editions incorrectly reported that the parking garage of the Holiday Inn in the 300 block of West Pratt Street would be available to the public for watching the papal parade tomorrow. The garage will not be open to the public for watching the event.The Sun regrets the error.
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NEWS
By Betsy Garland Wilmerding | January 21, 1997
THE SAD IRONY about young children watching television and videos is that they are the members of society who need that diversion least. Their expansive imagination and natural enthusiasm for the present render home screen entertainment unnecessary. Listen to 10-year-old Paddy Clark, protagonist in Roddy Doyle's evocative novel about childhood. He pretends the dining table is a fort and, from under there, surveys his world:''I saw things. . . . The sun was full of dust, huge chunks of it. It made me want to stop breathing.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | July 16, 2008
Baseball Home Run Derby 7 p.m. [ESPN]: This is the two-hour version of "going, going gone" from the All-Star festivities at Yankee Stadium. OK, so we know who won (and in case you don't, we won't spoil the surprise), but it's still a hoot watching - and no deep counts.
FEATURES
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 28, 1998
In the hit movie "The Truman Show," Truman Burbank discovers that he has been on television without knowing it for 30 years, with thousands of television cameras capturing his life and broadcasting it to an audience of millions.The premise is absurd, of course. Surely a person would know if his every moment was being watched by video cameras.Or would he?Let's take a day in the life of an average commuter.You pull out of your driveway in the morning and set off to work. A highway patrol cruiser falls in behind you. You're not speeding; you haven't broken any traffic laws.
NEWS
August 11, 1999
MOST PARENTS realize that watching television is not the most healthy activity for their children. But the American Academy of Pediatrics may have startled them nonetheless with its recent recommendation that children under age 2 watch no television at all.The organization also recommended that parents keep logs for their pediatricians of the nature and amount of programming their older children watch.Scientific evidence to support the claims was scant, and the warning may be overblown. But the exaggeration helped make the point: Children need mental and physical activity, and watching television is the epitome of passivity.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | April 29, 1995
Dad is going along with it grudgingly. Oldest sister Shanna is getting her favorite shows taped. And the two youngest children, Candace, 5, and Alicia, 10, are too busy playing to notice much difference in their lives. And Mom is delighted.The Whye family of Baltimore has almost finished a week of life without television and, so far, everyone is coping.Lynn and Milford Whye and their three daughters are participating in the first annual "National TV-Turnoff Week," sponsored by a Washington-based group called TV-Free America.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | January 21, 2006
At the risk of getting too existential for our own good, we pose this question: When is a bar officially a sports bar? If it serves beer and the grainy 27-inch Sylvania in the corner is turned to the Ravens even though there are only three people watching -- whoops, make that two, since one of them just passed out (but still gripping his Bud Light!) -- is that a sports bar? FYI -- For more Baltimore-area sports bar listings, go online to baltimoresun.com/sportsbars.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Although a majority of Americans say that they closely follow the daily turns of the O. J. Simpson trial, the number of people across the nation watching television news shows or reading newspapers continues to decline, according to a new poll to be released today by a media monitoring group.The Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press estimated -- based on its survey results -- that about 40 million people, or about 24 percent of the adult public, are watching "all or most" of the daily, live Simpson coverage and that about 59 percent "watched, read or heard" about the trial coverage.
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