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By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 30, 1994
"There -- look over there!"Everyone rushed to the side of the big boat, the kids pushing in front of their parents. And there it was: a magnificent, close-to-60-foot-long humpback whale that arched his back and dived, as if on cue."I never saw a live whale before," said Jessie Garant, an excited 12-year-old with a Plattsburgh, N.Y., school group.It was an overcast summer day and we were whale watching -- along with some 250 others -- on board the New England Aquarium's 103-foot Voyager II.We were in the middle of Stellwagen Bank, about an hour by boat from Boston.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 12, 2014
Last week, a federal judge told us what we already knew. Namely, that police in Ferguson, Mo., violated the rights of protesters demonstrating against the shooting death of Michael Brown. U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry struck down an ad hoc rule under which cops had said people could not stand still while peacefully protesting. Some were told they couldn't stop walking for more than five seconds; others that they had to walk faster. Again: These were not rioters. These were citizens seeking "peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances," as the First Amendment gives them the right to do. So Perry's ruling is welcome, but not particularly surprising.
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NEWS
By Abe Novick | September 20, 2000
ON TELEVISION, where does reality begin and end? Sports. At least with sports on television, I absolutely know that what I am watching is real. The World Wrestling Federation aside, it's become the most trusted viewing for that very reason. If the TV network or station says it's being broadcast live then, yes, there really is a real game going on somewhere. Seeing what's in store for us, as reality bites a mouthful out of the forthcoming fall primetime lineup, what were once clearly demarcated lines between entertainment programs and news, documentary and the commercials that sponsor them, are getting blurry, possibly because of the enormous success of "Survivor."
NEWS
By Batimore Sun Media Group staff | October 8, 2014
The Baltimore Sun canvassed readers, sources and leaders to determine the area's most intriguing movers and shakers of 2014. Here's our list: Keshia M. Pollack 35, associate professor of health and policy and management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Keshia Pollack spends a lot of time thinking about kids walking to school on Baltimore streets, service members riding in Humvees on the battlefield and Major League...
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman | February 20, 1997
From his second-floor office, Hank Kaestner watches the traffic fly past Hunt Valley. There are Canada geese and cormorants, ospreys and owls, even a few bald eagles. The aerial show never stops, and Kaestner, an executive with McCormick & Co., keeps careful track of the birds, recording each new breed he sees at work.Mixing spices and species does him good, he says."People have such stress in their jobs," says Kaestner, of Timonium. "Nature is one of the few medicines available for free."
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | January 22, 1995
Chicago. -- Trial of the year. Trial of the decade. Trial of the century. Whatever history's verdict on double-murder charges facing O.J. Simpson, it must also record some of the staggering costs.Mr. Simpson's phalanx of top-dollar lawyers is widely believed to cost a convenient round number: everything Mr. Simpson has, a figure often put loosely at about $10 million.The cost to taxpayers is harder to estimate, much of it buried in routine budgets and salary schedules of the County of Los Angeles, but obviously reaching into the millions of dollars.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 10, 1995
MY CHILDREN were sitting motionless. For a moment, I thought they had turned to stone for the rude things they say to each other -- as I have often predicted they would -- but then I realized they were watching cartoons.Not cartoons du jour, such as "X-Men" or "Aladdin," but the antique ones. Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. Tom and Jerry. Yogi and Boo-Boo. The Jetsons. Popeye. Roadrunner. The ones we watched as kids.These cartoons looked so good on the TV screen -- not gray and grainy the way I remembered them -- that I thought Ted Turner had purchased them all, colorized them, remixed the sound and added long-lost footage.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. - -As the undefeated Ravens measure themselves against the New England Patriots today, it's difficult to do the same with their starting quarterbacks. The Patriots' Tom Brady has won three Super Bowls, and the Ravens' Joe Flacco hasn't played three seasons. Flacco prefers casually walking through the front door of Bonefish Grill, and Brady tries to avoid paparazzi when whisking his Brazilian supermodel wife to the trendiest restaurants in Boston. Brady kicks back in limousines, and Flacco turns down the dealership when it wants to pick up his car for an oil change.
SPORTS
January 25, 2007
Good morning -- NHL -- Your All-Star Game was last night? We were watching American Idol.
NEWS
October 7, 1995
The special section in Wednesday's editions incorrectly reported that the parking garage of the Holiday Inn in the 300 block of West Pratt Street would be available to the public for watching the papal parade tomorrow. The garage will not be open to the public for watching the event.The Sun regrets the error.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Thursday's sellout crowd meant that every seat in Camden Yards was filled, including the worst in the ballpark. The five seats in Section 306, Row 25 - even with the foul pole in right field and level with the roof of the eight-story B&O Warehouse - are about as far from the action as you could get. But the view isn't bad - only a portion of right field was obstructed - and, most importantly, the fans still felt they were part of the game....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean Welsh and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
No need to worry about how you're going to watch that Orioles game while in the office Friday afternoon. There's an app for that. Much like during the World Cup this summer, sports fans can multi-task at the office thanks to the web and apps for your tablet or smart phone. American League Division Series games between the Baltimore Orioles and Detroit Tigers will air on TBS - and for those stuck in the office on Friday, on www.tbs.com and via the Watch TBS app. According to TBS, "Fans will be able to access the games whenever and wherever they desire by logging in with the user name and password provided by their TV service provider.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
NEW YORK - When the Yankee Stadium crowd began chanting New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter's name after his final at-bat Wednesday after a routine groundout - trying to coax the future Hall of Famer out of the dugout - Orioles manager Buck Showalter knew it wasn't happening. It wasn't the right time. “He had a tough at-bat, a ground ball back to the pitcher,” Showalter said, “I told a couple of our guys, 'He ain't coming out of the dugout. Just watch.' That's all you need to know about Derek because it didn't fit in the context of what was [happening]
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A flood watch is in effect across much of the Baltimore region starting at 6 p.m., with two inches of rain possible overnight into Thursday morning. The National Weather Service issued the watch through late Wednesday night, cautioning that heavy rain could cause flooding in low-lying and urban areas. It is in effect for Baltimore City and Baltimore, Howard, Anne Arundel and Harford counties. An inch or two of rain is forecast, with higher amounts possible in some areas, depending on where the bands of heaviest precipitation set up. A high pressure system is moving off of northern New England as a low pressure system moves in from the Atlantic and up the coast.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 15, 2014
Congratulations to Cleveland Browns fans. They finally have a competitive team back in the National Football League. The Browns were on that level in December 2002, the last time they went to the playoffs. Of course, they lost in the first round to the Pittsburgh Steelers, but after two weeks of the 2014 season, Cleveland is making the AFC North race interesting. The Cincinnati Bengals (2-0) are still the favorite to repeat as division champions, but the other three teams - Ravens, Browns, Steelers - have split their first two games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
[UPDATE] The premiere of CBS "Thursday Night Football" drew an average audience 20.8 million viewers making it the second highest rated show on TV behind only NBC's "Sunday Night Football. " The size of that audience for the Ravens 26-6 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers is a big victory for CBS on a very large gamble that viewers were ready for another weeknight of primetime football. CBS is charging advertisers the second highest ad rate on TV, $500,000 for a 30-second spot, by promising the Thursday night games will draw 20 million viewers combined with the simulcast on the NFL Network.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 7, 2014
Few players can torment a fan base like quarterback Joe Flacco. Sunday afternoons in Baltimore during the NFL season have become an elevator ride of emotions with No. 5. We cheer him. We boo him. We love him. We hate him. Sometimes he has the arm strength of Vinny Testaverde and other times he has the brain of Kyle Boller. The suggestion here is for Ravens fans to sit back, fasten their seat belts and get the cat out of the room so you don't kick it. And, just enjoy the ride because no one knows where it's going to end. Despite playing a poor first half Sunday in the season opening loss to the Cincinnati Bengals, Flacco almost rallied the Ravens from a 15-point first half deficit by throwing for 271 yards in the second half including an 80-yard touchdown pass to receiver Steve Smith with 5 minutes and 46 seconds left in the game.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Three men who were sexually abused by a church youth-ministry leader years ago experienced a measure of justice Wednesday as they confronted their abuser in court, read emotion-charged statements about how his crimes have damaged their lives, and heard a judge sentence him to 16 years in prison. Jediah Tanguay, 33; Benjamin Tanguay, 31; and Roger Robbins, 30, were minors in the 1990s when Raymond Fernandez, then a longtime youth leader at Greater Grace World Outreach Church in East Baltimore, has admitted he molested them.
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