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By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
As a vocal opponent of a wastewater treatment plant vital to Glenelg High School's much-needed addition, Mary Jane Grauso said her only objective is to ensure the safety of the community's drinking water. But her activism has caused consternation among residents who say Grauso's position as the newly elected president of the PTA Council of Howard County is awkward at best, a potential conflict of interest at worse. "The concern that is voiced most frequently is that people are afraid that her actions as a private citizen may become confused with her actions as the president of the Howard County PTA," said Johnnie Nussbaum, a Glenelg parent and vice president of the school's PTSA, who has fielded similar concerns from other parents.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
Hopes that a long-awaited, 400-seat addition at Glenelg High School will be ready for use late next year were dealt a blow by a request this week for a new state hearing on a wastewater treatment plant vital to the project, school officials said. Howard school Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin and Chief Operating Officer Raymond Brown said a request for another Maryland Department of the Environment hearing on the disputed wastewater treatment plant for the school could delay completion of the addition until April or August 2007.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho | May 15, 2005
The Howard County school system is one step closer to building the much-needed 400-seat addition at Glenelg High School. The Maryland Department of the Environment informed school officials last week that it has decided to issue a permit for the high school's proposed wastewater treatment facility that will accommodate the addition - despite concerns of a few residents over possible contamination of drinking water in western Howard County. "The permit is fully protective of public health and state groundwater quality standards," MDE stated in a notice of final determination.
NEWS
By Jessica Bylander and Jessica Bylander,Special to baltimoresun.com | April 29, 2005
More than $7.1 million in revenue has been collected this year from 175 owners of wastewater treatment facilities as part of the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fund, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced today. "The revenue from this historic effort is enabling us to make future generations proud to call Maryland home of the Chesapeake Bay," Ehrlich said in a statement. "I applaud Comptroller Schaefer and the state comptroller office's work with the Maryland Department of the Environment for getting this program up and running so quickly."
NEWS
April 10, 2005
Watson's actions merit higher office Spending public money and carrying out the public's business can be difficult and controversial. Five years ago, I was highly critical of the way our school board operated. I pointed to our county council as a model which should be emulated. Since then, each school board member has chosen to resign, not run for re-election, or been voted out of office. The completely new board, headed by Chairperson Courtney Watson, has shown a consistent responsiveness to the public they serve.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
People complaining about potential environmental hazards from a wastewater treatment system needed for an expansion of Glenelg High School should be ignored, says County Councilman Charles C. Feaga, a western county Republican. "Those people were anti-growth in the extreme, and some are only recently here," Feaga told a meeting of County Council and school board members Wednesday. He was describing testimony at a state environmental hearing he attended Monday night at the school. The state must issue a permit for the treatment system before the addition can be built.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
Howard County school officials remain hopeful about getting state approval for a new wastewater treatment facility for Glenelg High School's much-needed addition, despite concerns over possible contamination of drinking water in western Howard County. Nearly 100 people gathered at Glenelg for a public hearing Monday night before the Maryland Department of the Environment, which must issue a permit for the treatment facility. The crowd appeared evenly split between those who were concerned over the effects of the proposed treatment facility on the drinking water and those who disagreed with that assessment, saying that the crowded high school desperately needs more seats.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
Carroll County will save more than $100,000 in fines for temperature violations last summer at its wastewater treatment plant near Hampstead while the county takes its case to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, officials learned yesterday. Carroll Circuit Judge J. Barry Hughes ruled against the county's request that he review the Maryland Department of Environment requirements. But he granted the county's request to stay the imposition of fines and the enforcement of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued by MDE in January for one year, or until the appeals court reaches a final decision.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 17, 2004
In Baltimore City State proposes $1.4 million payment for false conviction The state proposed yesterday $1.4 million in compensation for Michael Austin, a Baltimore man who spent 27 years in prison on a faulty murder conviction. The amount, calculated by the state Department of Budget and Management, is an estimation of the financial loss Austin suffered because of his years in prison. The award also includes up to $5,000 for financial counseling. The Board of Public Works is scheduled to vote on the proposal today.
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