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Wastewater

NEWS
October 18, 2005
Maryland: Oysters A longer season and a higher price Maryland oystermen will have a longer season this year - starting today instead of early November - and will get more money for oysters because production in the Gulf Coast has been crippled by hurricanes. A bushel of oysters from the Chesapeake Bay could fetch more than $40 this winter - up from about $30 a bushel last season - because of sharply reduced supply. But the Chesapeake's tiny catch won't make much difference in the nation's oyster supply.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
The case against a wastewater treatment plant vital to an addition at Glenelg High School has survived after an administrative law judge ruled that residents opposed to the facility have legal standing to complain about potential water contamination and other environmental concerns. In a nine-page opinion issued Thursday and mailed to the parties late last week, Judge Neile S. Friedman wrote that the four western Howard residents would be aggrieved by the treatment plant differently than the general public.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 11, 2005
An attempt to settle a wastewater treatment dispute that has delayed construction of a high school addition in western Howard County failed yesterday, both sides said, setting up the issue for a state administrative hearing Nov. 7. Maryland Department of the Environment officials gave preliminary approval for a treatment plant in May, but residents appealed. Yesterday's settlement conference was an attempt to solve the dispute. The 400-seat addition to Glenelg High School originally was to have opened by last year, and officials were hoping now for a spring 2007 opening, with August 2007 as a fallback time.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
Howard County school officials say a proposed wastewater treatment plant for Glenelg High School is safe. So does the Maryland Department of the Environment, which approved a permit that is "fully protective of public health and state groundwater quality standards." But several western Howard residents are not too sure. "What options do you have when you create a monster?" said Rose Fieghenne, a longtime Glenelg resident who lives near the high school. "I haven't seen evidence of assurances.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
Hopes that a long-awaited, 400-seat addition at Glenelg High School will be ready for use late next year were dealt a blow by a request this week for a new state hearing on a wastewater treatment plant vital to the project, school officials said. Howard school Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin and Chief Operating Officer Raymond Brown said a request for another Maryland Department of the Environment hearing on the disputed wastewater treatment plant for the school could delay completion of the addition until April or August 2007.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho | May 15, 2005
The Howard County school system is one step closer to building the much-needed 400-seat addition at Glenelg High School. The Maryland Department of the Environment informed school officials last week that it has decided to issue a permit for the high school's proposed wastewater treatment facility that will accommodate the addition - despite concerns of a few residents over possible contamination of drinking water in western Howard County. "The permit is fully protective of public health and state groundwater quality standards," MDE stated in a notice of final determination.
NEWS
By Jessica Bylander and Jessica Bylander,Special to baltimoresun.com | April 29, 2005
More than $7.1 million in revenue has been collected this year from 175 owners of wastewater treatment facilities as part of the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fund, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced today. "The revenue from this historic effort is enabling us to make future generations proud to call Maryland home of the Chesapeake Bay," Ehrlich said in a statement. "I applaud Comptroller Schaefer and the state comptroller office's work with the Maryland Department of the Environment for getting this program up and running so quickly."
NEWS
April 10, 2005
Watson's actions merit higher office Spending public money and carrying out the public's business can be difficult and controversial. Five years ago, I was highly critical of the way our school board operated. I pointed to our county council as a model which should be emulated. Since then, each school board member has chosen to resign, not run for re-election, or been voted out of office. The completely new board, headed by Chairperson Courtney Watson, has shown a consistent responsiveness to the public they serve.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
People complaining about potential environmental hazards from a wastewater treatment system needed for an expansion of Glenelg High School should be ignored, says County Councilman Charles C. Feaga, a western county Republican. "Those people were anti-growth in the extreme, and some are only recently here," Feaga told a meeting of County Council and school board members Wednesday. He was describing testimony at a state environmental hearing he attended Monday night at the school. The state must issue a permit for the treatment system before the addition can be built.
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