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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Howard County has agreed to supply treated wastewater to cool a massive computer center being built at Fort Meade by the National Security Agency - a money-saving, environment-conserving deal that officials say could serve as a model for others. The NSA is footing the cost of building a pump station, estimated at $40 million, and will pay the county up to $2 million a year for treated water that would otherwise be dumped into the Little Patuxent River. The station is to supply up to 5 million gallons of reclaimed wastewater per day when the NSA computer center opens in 2016.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Federal regulators approved new pollution limits Monday for Maryland's coastal bays aimed at restoring water quality in the shallow lagoons that serve both as playground for Ocean City vacationers and vital habitat for fish and wildlife. Like the Chesapeake Bay, the state's coastal bays suffer from an overdose of nitrogen and phosphorus, which feed algae blooms and stress fish by depleting levels of dissolved oxygen in the water. The bays have been officially recognized as impaired by nutrient pollution since the mid-1990s.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
More than 16,000 Anne Arundel County homeowners who pay for unmetered sewer service but not public water probably will see their wastewater bills drop by about one-third, after the county auditor's office said they were paying too much. "They have been overcharged because their consumption was overstated by 50 percent," county auditor Teresa Sutherland said. Those customers probably will see wastewater bills decrease by more than $160 a year, as the county agreed with a recent audit recommendation to reduce the usage estimate at the root of the audit's findings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Thomas D. McKewen, a materials recovery and waste management expert who was the founding director of Maryland Environmental Service, died June 13 of congestive heart failure at his home in Ashburn, Va. The former Towson resident was 86. "I had been hearing that he was a person with a lot of ability and had an understanding of the environmental work we were doing," said former Gov. Marvin J. Mandel, who appointed Mr. McKewen as director of the...
NEWS
January 9, 1994
The state Department of the Environment will conduct a public meeting and hearing tomorrow to discuss a request by Ridge Engineering of Hampstead for a permit to discharge treated wastewater into sewers leading to the Hampstead Wastewater Treatment Plant.The meeting will be at 10:30 a.m. in the Dixon Room of the Carroll County Public Library's Westminster branch on Main Street. A public hearing on the request will follow the meeting.Department of the Environment officials said the company has requested a permit for an intermittent discharge of 2,000 gallons per day of treated wastewater from metal-finishing operations.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1995
The state will nearly double its financial contribution toward upgrading the Annapolis wastewater treatment plant to improve the quality of water being discharged into the Chesapeake Bay.The Board of Public Works yesterday approved paying an additional $3.2 million toward the $18.4 million treatment center, bringing the state's payment to nearly $6.8 million. The county is paying the remaining $11.6 million.Construction of the biological nutrient removal facility is expected to begin in May and be done by February 1998.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | September 10, 2006
A grease blockage caused leakage of about 1,200 gallons of wastewater next to a fishing pier at Lake Elkhorn in Columbia this week, and warning signs will be posted there for about two weeks, according to Robert M. Beringer, utilities bureau chief for Howard County. Beringer said the wastewater was forced up from a manhole cover in a 12-inch sewer line next to the foot path that runs between the fishing pier and a two-story pavilion near the lake's dam. The blockage was caused by grease from restaurants upstream, off Snowden River Parkway.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
A three-year, $100 million effort to cut levels of nutrients coming from Howard County's wastewater treatment plant in Savage got under way Thursday with a ceremonial groundbreaking. More than five years in the planning, the project will use waste from a nearby ice cream plant to help produce enough bacteria to sharply reduce the nitrogen being emitted with wastewater from 3,900 pounds a day now, to 830 pounds per day in 2012, when the work is completed. Reuse of some treated water will also help by diverting it from the Patuxent River.
NEWS
December 11, 1995
Westminster will receive block grants to extend wastewater treatment to 19 homes in Cranberry and to explore turning the former West End School into an adult day care center and senior housing.The Community Development Block Grant is federal money distributed by the state. Gov. Parris N. Glendening sent word of the awards last week.The homes, in an unincorporated area in Cranberry, have failing septic systems. A grant for $253,000 will pay for the city of Westminster to extend wastewater services to those homes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 14, 2004
Anne Arundel County residents were warned away from a section of the South River yesterday after 10,000 gallons of wastewater flowed into Granville Creek because of a valve failure Sunday evening. The spill occurred at Woodside and Meadow Roads, county officials said. Crews repaired the valve Sunday night. County health officials said people should avoid contact with water in Granville Creek and in the South River near the Sylvan Shores community. Those areas will remain closed until tests show the sewage spill is no longer affecting water quality.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 16, 2014
The Army says a 1.8 million gallon overflow of partially treated sewage from a wastewater treatment plant serving Aberdeen Proving Ground's Edgewood Area earlier this month had minimal effect on the environment. "In a report received [May 8] at APG's Environmental Division, test results from samples taken from King's Creek and Bush River May 2, indicated the wastewater overflow that occurred May 1, was diluted and mostly rainwater," the APG Garrison said in a news release Wednesday.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Howard County has agreed to supply treated wastewater to cool a massive computer center being built at Fort Meade by the National Security Agency - a money-saving, environment-conserving deal that officials say could serve as a model for others. The NSA is footing the cost of building a pump station, estimated at $40 million, and will pay the county up to $2 million a year for treated water that would otherwise be dumped into the Little Patuxent River. The station is to supply up to 5 million gallons of reclaimed wastewater per day when the NSA computer center opens in 2016.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
The city's Board of Estimates on Wednesday approved a massive $263 million contract for constructing a new facility aimed at curbing pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. The spending panel voted to award the contract to Archer Western Contractors LLC, which will build the first phase of a nutrient removal facility at the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant. More than 90 percent of the contract will be covered by funds from the state's "flush" tax, which charges residents who use municipal wastewater systems, city officials said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
More than 16,000 Anne Arundel County homeowners who pay for unmetered sewer service but not public water probably will see their wastewater bills drop by about one-third, after the county auditor's office said they were paying too much. "They have been overcharged because their consumption was overstated by 50 percent," county auditor Teresa Sutherland said. Those customers probably will see wastewater bills decrease by more than $160 a year, as the county agreed with a recent audit recommendation to reduce the usage estimate at the root of the audit's findings.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
Lecture series Novelist Ralph Peters will deliver the lecture, "The Price of Historical Illiteracy: Wishful Thinking and the Death of Strategy," at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at St. John's College, 60 College Ave. in Annapolis. The lecture is the first in a new joint series between St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy to honor the memory of Lt. Commander Erik S. Kristensen, a U.S. Navy SEAL who was killed in Afghanistan in 2005. Information: stjohnscollege.edu. Flower club meets The Annapolis Horticulture Society meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday at St. Anne's Parish Hall, 199 Duke of Gloucester St. Richard Olsen of the National Arboretum speaks on "Japanese Plants and Their Appeal.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
State environmental officials have sued a Westminster machining and welding business, accusing the company of illegally discharging wastewater with excessive amounts of copper for more than 20 years. The maximum penalty for the alleged offense is $10,000 a day for each violation, according to the lawsuit filed Wednesday in Carroll County Circuit Court by lawyers for the Maryland Department of the Environment. The state alleges that Laser Applications Inc., in the 1100 block of Business Parkway South, has never had a permit to discharge wastewater from its "water jet" cutting processes.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Rapid growth in Howard County has long had people concerned about crowded roads, but the Howard County Sierra Club has another concern: crowded sewage pipes. With all the growth planned for Howard in coming years, the club says, there will be too much sewage polluting the Little Patuxent and Patapsco rivers and, ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. The county has plans to expand its Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant in Savage and has applied for a permit to release more wastewater into the Little Patuxent River.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
A recent article by Tim Wheeler ("Septic task force produces 'roadmap' for MD growth," Nov. 23) perpetuates a false narrative regarding septic systems that the state is using as an excuse to arrest property rights and local autonomy in rural counties. The article states: "Per household, officials say, septic systems release far more nitrogen into ground water and nearby streams than do properly functioning wastewater treatment plants. " PlanMaryland, the new statewide planning document that Gov. Martin O'Malley may soon sign without legislative input, makes the same claim.
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