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By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A sewage overflow estimated at 50,000 gallons was released into Miller Run in west Catonsville, and officials have advised people avoid contact with the waste water. Baltimore County's public works department responded to the sanitary sewer overflow Monday morning. A resident discovered the sewage, which overflowed from a manhole in a right-of-way south of Baltimore National Pike and north of Quilting Bee Road. The overflow was undetected for about seven days; after cleaning roots obstructing the line, the department stopped the overflow at 10 a.m., officials said.
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NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
A sewage overflow estimated at 50,000 gallons was released into Miller Run in west Catonsville, and officials have advised people avoid contact with the waste water. Baltimore County's public works department responded to the sanitary sewer overflow Monday morning. A resident discovered the sewage, which overflowed from a manhole in a right-of-way south of Baltimore National Pike and north of Quilting Bee Road. The overflow was undetected for about seven days; after cleaning roots obstructing the line, the department stopped the overflow at 10 a.m., officials said.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 11, 1993
A federal grand jury has indicted America's second-largest potato grower, charging that Agri-Empire Corp. used nondisinfected waste water to grow its potatoes before shipping millions of them across the nation to supermarkets, potato brokers and ultimately fast-food restaurants.The company, one of the largest agricultural businesses in California, was not charged with endangering human health, and public health experts said it was impossible to say whether a health hazard would have been created by the practice alleged in the indictment.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
For years, the ill effects of improperly dumped hazardous wastes was a hot topic in the media. However, it seems as though only big name corporations that get caught disposing colossal amounts of waste get covered today. Candy Thomson's recent report shows that there are still concerns when it comes to toxic dumping locally ("Baltimore man sentenced in hazardous waste case," April 29). The fact that the article reports on an average person and not a large corporation deserves applause.
NEWS
December 10, 1990
Mark A. Noblett, a professional engineer, recently joined McCrone Inc. as an environmental design team leader in the company's Annapolis office.Noblett will lead a civil-sanitary engineering design team for McCrone, an engineering, environmental consulting, land planning, and surveying firm with eight offices in Maryland.A registered professional engineer in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and New York, Noblett has more than 22 years of experience in engineering water supply, treatment and distribution; waste water collection, treatment and odor control; and hazardous waste design.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Baltimore officials have decided not to allow the construction of a second processing facility to turn wet sludge into dry pellets at the Back River Waste Water Treatment Plant.The first such processing facility -- which uses indirect heat to make the conversion -- is in its start-up phase and is expected to be operational early next year.But plans for a second facility at the city-owned plant in eastern Baltimore County -- using direct heat -- had drawn fire from nearby residents and county politicians.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
A Baltimore company has agreed to pay $50,000 to settle a fraud claim that it improperly dumped contaminated waste into the city's sewers, the U.S. attorney's office said yesterday.The company, Clean America, had a contract to dispose of waste water contaminated by fire-fighting foam used to douse jet fuel fires after tests at the Randle Cliff Research Laboratory in Chesapeake Beach.Instead of shipping the waste to a facility in Delaware, prosecutors say the company instead decided to dump it down city sewer drains.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
Commissioner Donald I. Dell has provided Carroll County with rTC his vision for the future -- something his two colleagues have failed to do. He believes the county's future hinges on fostering business and industrial development in Finksburg with the help of two major public works projects -- extending Interstate 795 from Baltimore County into Carroll and building a waste-to-energy incinerator at the Northern Landfill.Mr. Dell's plan doesn't conflict with his campaign slogan -- "Keep Carroll country" -- as much as it might seem.
NEWS
March 2, 1991
There were no big headlines or television cameras to greet it, but a milestone has occurred in the metropolitan area's development history: Baltimore County has agreed to pay the full cost of a $35.6-million expansion of the Patapsco Waste Water Treatment Plant in Curtis Bay.Historically, Baltimore City has constructed and owned most of the region's water and sewage facilities. As the surrounding counties have grown, they have contributed to a share of that burden. Yet never before has the city been able to convince its suburban partners that additional service needs are strictly outside Baltimore's boundaries and that the financially strapped city should not be subsidizing the counties.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
Villa Julie College can receive a state permit to discharge treated sewage water into a stream that intermittently feeds the Jones Falls, a state administrative law judge has ruled.The decision is the latest in a series of rulings that have allowed the private, four-year institution to proceed with plans to expand at its location in the semi-rural Green Spring Valley over opposition from neighbors.Baltimore County has authorized an amendment to its water and sewer master plan permitting the college to build a waste water treatment plant to replace a failing septic system.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Hooray for Del. Heather Mizeur for staring down oil companies over fracking in Maryland ("No studies? No fracking," Sept. 13). Delegate Mizeur is demanding solid, scientific studies of all the risks of fracking before allowing it here. The oil industry maintains that fracking is safe. But if fracking is safe, why did the oil industry seek, and get, special treatment in the 2005 Energy Bill to keep the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from regulating fracking? This "Halliburton Loophole" is named after former Vice President and Halliburton oil chief Dick Cheney.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Scientists have found more intersex fish in Maryland, this time on the Eastern Shore, and their research suggests one possible source of the gender-bending condition could be the poultry manure that is widely used there to fertilize croplands. Six lakes and ponds on the Delmarva Peninsula sampled over the past two years have yielded male largemouth bass carrying eggs, according to University of Maryland scientists. Those are the first intersex fish reported there, though researchers found the condition several years ago in smallmouth bass in the Potomac and its tributaries, and recently found it in smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna.
NEWS
By Vinod Thomas and Ronald S. Parker | June 1, 2010
The challenge of providing enough water safe for human consumption has grown drastically over the past two decades. Back in 1992, the Rio Earth Summit and the International Conference on Water and Environment in Dublin brought to the world's attention the scarcity of clean water and its vital link to environmental degradation. Countries responded mainly by building more infrastructure. Meanwhile, they continued to overlook the deteriorating state of the world's aquatic resources. As a result, the nations of the world, including the United States, face a common menace that drives home the link between water and the environment.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
Just six days into summer, more Baltimore fire hydrants have been hacked open this year than last - wasting millions of gallons of water, city officials said. This year, people have burst open 401 hydrants to bask in the comfort of a free rush of cooling water, compared with 337 for all of last year, according to the Department of Public Works. "We've had a really hot period, and they're up this year," said Kurt Kocher, department spokesman. Because of the heat and pollution, state officials have issued a "code red" air-pollution warning for today, when 90-degree temperatures are expected.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
A Baltimore company has agreed to pay $50,000 to settle a fraud claim that it improperly dumped contaminated waste into the city's sewers, the U.S. attorney's office said yesterday.The company, Clean America, had a contract to dispose of waste water contaminated by fire-fighting foam used to douse jet fuel fires after tests at the Randle Cliff Research Laboratory in Chesapeake Beach.Instead of shipping the waste to a facility in Delaware, prosecutors say the company instead decided to dump it down city sewer drains.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1997
Baltimore is overcharging hundreds of thousands of area residents for sewer and water service, according to a seven-month investigation by city auditors who say that users should get refunds.Comptroller Joan M. Pratt, who launched the investigation, is calling for the Department of Public Works to scrap the way it calculates water and sewer rates to ensure that city and some county residents don't overpay.Off 2 percentAuditors say they have found that public works officials overestimated expenditures and underestimated revenues to justify the 19 percent water rate increase in April 1996.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Hooray for Del. Heather Mizeur for staring down oil companies over fracking in Maryland ("No studies? No fracking," Sept. 13). Delegate Mizeur is demanding solid, scientific studies of all the risks of fracking before allowing it here. The oil industry maintains that fracking is safe. But if fracking is safe, why did the oil industry seek, and get, special treatment in the 2005 Energy Bill to keep the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from regulating fracking? This "Halliburton Loophole" is named after former Vice President and Halliburton oil chief Dick Cheney.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1997
Baltimore is overcharging hundreds of thousands of area residents for sewer and water service, according to a seven-month investigation by city auditors who say that users should get refunds.Comptroller Joan M. Pratt, who launched the investigation, is calling for the Department of Public Works to scrap the way it calculates water and sewer rates to ensure that city and some county residents don't overpay.Off 2 percentAuditors say they have found that public works officials overestimated expenditures and underestimated revenues to justify the 19 percent water rate increase in April 1996.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1996
Everything is getting more expensive these days, even a drink of water.In Baltimore, top city officials yesterday approved raising water and sewer fees by 19 percent, or about $60 a year for an average household."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Baltimore officials have decided not to allow the construction of a second processing facility to turn wet sludge into dry pellets at the Back River Waste Water Treatment Plant.The first such processing facility -- which uses indirect heat to make the conversion -- is in its start-up phase and is expected to be operational early next year.But plans for a second facility at the city-owned plant in eastern Baltimore County -- using direct heat -- had drawn fire from nearby residents and county politicians.
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