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NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | September 12, 1993
By canceling their trip to a Tennessee composting plant, Carroll's commissioners unwittingly may have done the county's Waste to Energy Committee a big favor.Staying home means that the commissioners won't be blatantly undercutting the efforts of this high-powered citizens' committee develop alternatives to dumping solid waste into landfills.But committee members shouldn't be surprised when commissioners Julia W. Gouge, Donald I. Dell and Elmer C. Lippy disregard their findings.In the past, the commissioners have had the decency to ignore the recommendations of these citizen committees after they completed their work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Thank you for the article "As permits expired, work began on waste to energy plant in city" (Aug. 9). I do not understand why regulators allow Energy Answers to keep going forward on their waste to energy incinerator despite missing deadlines. Waste to energy may make sense in Denmark where these plants are put in the communities that produce the waste, including wealthy communities and where there is a high rate of recycling (61 percent compared to our 29 percent) that has already reduced the waste stream before incineration.
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NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | June 27, 1993
Members of Carroll's Citizen Waste to Energy Committee got a quick lesson in solid waste calculus on their recent trip to amunicipal waste-to-energy plant in Lancaster, Pa. They also discovered this particular solid waste disposal equation has a lot more variables than they originally thought.At first blush, turning garbage into energy sounds like a simple, or, as my calculus professor used to say, elegant solution for the ever-vexing problem of garbage disposal.For a county such as Carroll, which is running out of landfill space, the prospect of burning garbage and reducing it to one-tenth its original volume is inviting.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Construction began this week on a trash-burning power plant in South Baltimore, meeting a state-imposed deadline, a company spokeswoman said. But permits the city issued years ago to build the controversial 160-megawatt facility have expired, raising questions among environmentalists opposed to the project of whether the developer actually met the state's timetable. Construction began Tuesday, the date by which the Maryland Public Service Commission required work to begin, said Elona Cadman, spokeswoman for Energy Answers in Albany, N.Y. Had the deadline not been met, state approvals for the project would have expired and the company would have had to apply all over again, a process that could have taken years and provided new opportunities for opponents to object.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
Thank you for the article "As permits expired, work began on waste to energy plant in city" (Aug. 9). I do not understand why regulators allow Energy Answers to keep going forward on their waste to energy incinerator despite missing deadlines. Waste to energy may make sense in Denmark where these plants are put in the communities that produce the waste, including wealthy communities and where there is a high rate of recycling (61 percent compared to our 29 percent) that has already reduced the waste stream before incineration.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Construction began this week on a trash-burning power plant in South Baltimore, meeting a state-imposed deadline, a company spokeswoman said. But permits the city issued years ago to build the controversial 160-megawatt facility have expired, raising questions among environmentalists opposed to the project of whether the developer actually met the state's timetable. Construction began Tuesday, the date by which the Maryland Public Service Commission required work to begin, said Elona Cadman, spokeswoman for Energy Answers in Albany, N.Y. Had the deadline not been met, state approvals for the project would have expired and the company would have had to apply all over again, a process that could have taken years and provided new opportunities for opponents to object.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | January 2, 1991
The County Commissioners say they are keeping an open mind about joining three other counties in building a waste-to-energy plant, and have not ruled out putting such a plant in Carroll."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Carroll County's waste-to-energy study committee learned yesterday how trash is converted to electricity, what the conversion facilities look like and what kind of air pollutants are associated with them.Committee member Richard J. Borkowicz, an environmental engineer who has helped design waste-to-energy plants, provided the committee with an overview of a waste-to-energy plant and its operations.Mr. Borkowicz said that in the most common waste-to-energy plant, garbage is dumped into a receiving pit and then moved into a burner.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | February 27, 2008
The Carroll County commissioners received an official invitation yesterday from their Frederick County counterparts to consider participating in a regional waste-to-energy facility, a step forward in a long-term discussion in both counties on how to manage trash. With Carroll's commissioners in attendance at its meeting, the Frederick County Board of Commissioners voted 4-1 to call for "an expression of interest" from Carroll's board. The commissioners spent nearly two hours talking about the proposed plant, including environmental and financial concerns.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
Carroll commissioners appointed 23 people yesterday to a Waste-to-Energy Study Committee and told them to investigate whether the county should build an incinerator.Committee members include Sykesville Mayor Lloyd R. Helt Jr., Hampstead Town Manager and Manchester councilman John Riley, Lehigh Portland Cement Co. Plant Manager David H. Roush, Uniontown activist Rachelle Hurwitz and Union Bridge Mayor Perry L. Jones Jr.Environmentalists, trash haulers and financial advisers also are on the committee, which will report to the commissioners in 18 months, Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy said.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | April 1, 2013
Optimism might seem out of place after the Waterkeeper Alliance's bitter loss in a recent lawsuit to hold Perdue Farms and its grower Alan Hudson responsible for polluting waterways with poultry manure. But it's possible to at least be hopeful of solutions, perhaps within the current decade, to this widespread bay pollution. Reasons for hope were less likely when the lawsuit was filed three years ago. Witness a survey recently presented by University of Maryland ag scientist Kenneth Staver.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 3, 2012
Two Harford County Council members are calling for a state investigator to examine circumstances surrounding the proposed transfer station in Joppa, including the county's move away from the waste to energy facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground. At Tuesday's Harford County Council meeting, Councilmen Dion Guthrie and Joe Woods defended their comments to The Aegis last week that Aberdeen Proving Ground garrison commander Col. Orlando Ortiz said it was the county that pulled out of a waste disposal agreement, not APG. Woods said he went into last week's meeting with Guthrie and Ortiz fully prepared to accuse the Army of not being a good neighbor, only to find out it was the county that was not a good neighbor.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Regarding your article about the proposed waste-to-energy plant in South Baltimore, I don't think it's a good idea to have another such plant in the area since there is already such a high concentration of pollution there ("Delay sought for trash-burning power plant in Fairfield," Jan. 9). If we are trying to reduce pollutants in the air, all a new plant would do is discourage recycling and make it even harder to build other "green" energy projects. That's a step backward, not forward.
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Carroll should continue as partner with Frederick in waste-to-energy facility Carroll County is approaching decision time on whether it will remain a partner with Frederick County in building a waste-to-energy facility in Frederick County that would not only dispose of waste for both jurisdictions, but also generate electricity in the process. Years ago, the facility was recommended as a viable long-term solution to the county's waste disposal problem by the county's Department of Public Works, and was approved by the sitting commissioners.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
In a move that increases Maryland's commitment to renewable energy, the state Board of Public Works approved a deal Wednesday under which a Virginia company will be given a 30-year lease on land at an Eastern Shore prison to build a plant that will generate electricity out of a mixture of crops and chicken manure. Under its agreement with ECOCORP Inc. of Arlington, Va., the state will provide a 4.2-acre site at the Eastern Correctional Institute near Princess Anne at an annual rent of $100 for the company to construct the so-called anaerobic digester.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Some companies with interests in Maryland have found a new way to show support for Gov. Martin O'Malley: They're contributing tens of thousands of dollars to the Democratic Governors Association. Last December, O'Malley took the helm of the DGA, where as chairman he is charged with raising large sums to elect Democratic governors nationwide. Under his leadership, the group raised a record $11 million during the first six months of this year — including donations from Exelon Corp.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Some companies with interests in Maryland have found a new way to show support for Gov. Martin O'Malley: They're contributing tens of thousands of dollars to the Democratic Governors Association. Last December, O'Malley took the helm of the DGA, where as chairman he is charged with raising large sums to elect Democratic governors nationwide. Under his leadership, the group raised a record $11 million during the first six months of this year — including donations from Exelon Corp.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | January 22, 2008
The air inside the Harford County Resource Recovery Facility in Joppa is filled with an ever-present stench of trash. "That's the smell of money," said Frank Henderson, Harford's deputy director of environmental affairs, as he took a deep breath at the plant that residents call simply "the waste-to-energy." Harford County, which has been turning trash into energy for 20 years, is considering replacing the 20-year-old plant with a multimillion-dollar upgrade that would be a viable source of power and revenue well into this century.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 10, 2011
There is some question about whether the electricity plant planned for a vacant, brown patch on Baltimore's waterfront would be truly "green" and "renewable. " The generator built by Energy Answers would burn waste otherwise destined for the dump. It would blow carbon dioxide and other unnatural stuff into the air. Its backers say it's cleaner than a coal-burning plant and will save many acres of landfill space. What's not debatable is that Central Maryland needs new generation plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011
Last week Gov. Martin O'Malley proved that you can support job creation while protecting our natural resources. By signing Senate Bill 690, which puts waste-to-energy on par with landfills, O'Malley proved he cares about jobs and the environment. Before legislation, both in and out-of-state landfills capturing methane qualified for Tier 1 credits, which created low paying jobs and environmental issues for the next generation. Senate Bill 690 simply expands Maryland's options for meeting its aggressive renewable energy standard and puts waste to energy on par with landfill gas, biomass and chicken waste in the state's renewable energy standard.
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