Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWaste Oil
IN THE NEWS

Waste Oil

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 8, 1992
The Maryland Department of the Environment has dropped a $2,000 penalty proposed last year against Lehigh Portland Cement Co. for accepting some waste oil with high lead levels."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
An Odenton man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to laundering money in a scheme involving stolen waste vegetable oil. Anthony Jean-Claude, 40, admitted in a plea agreement that he operated a scheme involving waste vegetable oil, which can be recycled into biodiesel fuel or as an additive for animal feed. According to Jean-Claude's plea agreement filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, he started in 2010 by teaming up with a partner to steal waste oil from restaurants in Maryland, Virginia and Washington using a flatbed truck and a mechanical pump.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The solution to reducing dependence on foreign fuel might be found in a restaurant's deep fryer, two Chesapeake High School graduates told environmental sciences classes there yesterday. Former Pasadena residents Christo Corsaut and Danielle Stinson have taken a semester off from college to travel across the country in their RV, a converted school bus that has been modified to run primarily on waste vegetable oil. The two have logged thousands of miles, with reduced particulate emissions thanks to recycled grease.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The owner of a College Park waste collection business pleaded guilty Monday to transporting stolen property as part of a scheme to steal waste vegetable oil, the U.S. attorney's office announced. Ahmad Qaabid Abdul-Rahim, 37, admitted in a plea agreement entered in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to receiving nearly $99,000 for selling more than 94,000 gallons of stolen waste vegetable oil during a nine-month period last year. Abdul-Rahim, who according to the plea agreement once played football at the University of Maryland, acknowledged that he and a friend first stole waste vegetable oil in 2010 from restaurants in Prince George's County, Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 7, 1993
One of the more annoying aspects of most renovation projects is that a solution to an old problem often creates a new problem. In many cases, the new problem involves getting rid of debris left over from a repair or change. That's the case for a Baltimore reader who wants to know how to get rid of an old oil-storage tank."I switched over to natural gas," he writes, "and I would like to drain my [oil] tank and remove it from my basement by myself. I'm concerned about a fire hazard if I leave it or, while removing it. I must cut it in sections to get it out of my basement."
SPORTS
August 27, 2010
Patrick Stingley writes: I'm sure you get this question all the time, but I can't seem to get a good answer anywhere else. I pumped a bunch of fuel, water and algae from the diesel tank in my boat. Where do you dispose of diesel fuel? I'm sure a lot of other boaters have this question every summer when the warm water allows all life to flourish, but I don't see an answer on the Maryland websites. Outdoors Girl applauds you efforts to keep the environment clean and went to the experts who handle all things icky, the Maryland Department of the Environment, to find out how you and other boaters can handle disposal in a responsible manner.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
A Severn man has been convicted of pouring 100 gallons of waste oil into his neighbor's yard, according to the Maryland attorney general's office. Lino G. Razuri, 43, of the 500 block of Queenstown Road was accused of removing a 275-gallon oil tank from his property and dumping on his neighbor's land in the 600 block of Queenstown Road in January. He was found guilty Tuesday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court.
NEWS
November 26, 1992
Waste sulfur blamed for Lehigh accidentAn accident that sent six Lehigh Portland Cement employees the hospital in Carroll County Nov. 5 was caused by trace amounts of sulfur compounds in a waste oil truck that was left open at the plant, company officials said yesterday.Lehigh released its finding after conducting what officials described as a preliminary investigation of the accident. The company said the waste oil contained hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans, which are known to cause the dizziness, breathing and eye problems and nausea symptoms shown by the employees.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
An Odenton man pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to laundering money in a scheme involving stolen waste vegetable oil. Anthony Jean-Claude, 40, admitted in a plea agreement that he operated a scheme involving waste vegetable oil, which can be recycled into biodiesel fuel or as an additive for animal feed. According to Jean-Claude's plea agreement filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, he started in 2010 by teaming up with a partner to steal waste oil from restaurants in Maryland, Virginia and Washington using a flatbed truck and a mechanical pump.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 25, 1993
Contamination by PCBs in a load of waste oil that was to burn in the kilns at Lehigh Portland Cement prompted the plant to suspend the burning of that fuel Nov. 12, said David H. Roush, manager of the Union Bridge plant.Early Nov. 12, a load of 5,000 gallons of waste oil was delivered to Lehigh and blended into about 195,000 gallons of waste oil already in the storage tank at Lehigh, Mr. Roush said.Laboratory tests done at the time showed a level of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) higher than state and federal guidelines allow.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | January 29, 2013
The automobile industry took its licks along with most other sectors of the economy during the recession, with only 10.4 million new vehicle sales in 2009 - a big drop from the peak of 17 million in 2005. In Laurel, many dealerships, such as Henry Gay, did not survive the recession, or like Fox, were bought out by larger conglomerates. But not only did Fred Frederick, owner of Laurel's oldest automobile dealership, survive the recession, but he's expanded his operation at a time when others are still recovering.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
A northbound section of Interstate 83 in Baltimore was temporarily closed Friday while city fire and state environmental crews cleaned about 15 gallons of spilled oil near Calvert Street, according to officials. The northbound lanes of the expressway between Fayette Street and Maryland Avenue were expected to reopen by 12:45 p.m., according to fire spokesman Chief Kevin Cartwright. There were no reports of injuries. Cartwright said a truck that was carrying waste oil began leaking near Calvert Street and up to North Avenue, where its driver exited onto Sisson Street.
SPORTS
August 27, 2010
Patrick Stingley writes: I'm sure you get this question all the time, but I can't seem to get a good answer anywhere else. I pumped a bunch of fuel, water and algae from the diesel tank in my boat. Where do you dispose of diesel fuel? I'm sure a lot of other boaters have this question every summer when the warm water allows all life to flourish, but I don't see an answer on the Maryland websites. Outdoors Girl applauds you efforts to keep the environment clean and went to the experts who handle all things icky, the Maryland Department of the Environment, to find out how you and other boaters can handle disposal in a responsible manner.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | May 14, 2008
Joel LaFerriere of Highland estimates that he goes to the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill a couple of times a week, mostly to toss in cardboard and other household debris, he said. Like many people, he likes going to the dump and even finds that the experience can be social. But, until recently, he was discouraged by the long wait to get in on Saturday mornings. "It used to get congested," he said. In fact, the line of cars would sometimes be so long it would spill out onto Marriottsville Road.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
America is addicted to oil. So when the price of oil doubles and then threatens to double again, there are large economic and social consequences. Feeling our pain, politicians want to pressure OPEC to increase production or tap the nation's strategic petroleum reserve. Such cures are unlikely to be effective. The world's oil supply is limited, global demand is growing fast and it's time for Congress to impose a much more efficient use of oil through tougher fuel economy and tighter building standards.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
A Severn man has been convicted of pouring 100 gallons of waste oil into his neighbor's yard, according to the Maryland attorney general's office. Lino G. Razuri, 43, of the 500 block of Queenstown Road was accused of removing a 275-gallon oil tank from his property and dumping on his neighbor's land in the 600 block of Queenstown Road in January. He was found guilty Tuesday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
An accident that sent six Lehigh Portland Cement employees to Carroll County General Hospital on Nov. 5 was caused by trace amounts of sulfur compounds in a waste oil truck that was left open at the Union Bridge plant, company officials said yesterday.The company released that finding after conducting what officials described as a preliminary investigation into the accident.The report said the substances -- hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans -- are known to cause dizziness, breathing and eye problems and nausea, the symptoms shown by the employees that morning.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2001
The former owner of a Baltimore waste oil firm pleaded guilty yesterday to ordering the destruction of company records sought for an investigation of a discharge of about 10,000 gallons of oil into the city's sewer system. Howard J. Goldstein, who was a corporate officer and principal owner of A&A Waste Oil Co., pleaded guilty to one count of obstruction of justice before Judge J. Frederick Motz in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Motz set a May 4 sentencing date for Goldstein, who could receive a maximum of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The solution to reducing dependence on foreign fuel might be found in a restaurant's deep fryer, two Chesapeake High School graduates told environmental sciences classes there yesterday. Former Pasadena residents Christo Corsaut and Danielle Stinson have taken a semester off from college to travel across the country in their RV, a converted school bus that has been modified to run primarily on waste vegetable oil. The pair have logged thousands of miles, with reduced particulate emissions thanks to recycled grease.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The solution to reducing dependence on foreign fuel might be found in a restaurant's deep fryer, two Chesapeake High School graduates told environmental sciences classes there yesterday. Former Pasadena residents Christo Corsaut and Danielle Stinson have taken a semester off from college to travel across the country in their RV, a converted school bus that has been modified to run primarily on waste vegetable oil. The two have logged thousands of miles, with reduced particulate emissions thanks to recycled grease.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.