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By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
County lawyers say they believe they have found a way for the CountyCouncil to legally remove proposed rubble landfill projects from thecounty's solid waste management plan.What's significant about the proposal is that it could affect the status of the proposed Gravel Hill Road rubble landfill near Havre de Grace and the planned Fort Hoyle Road rubble landfill project near Joppa.A proposal being considered by the council would allow the council to remove a landfill site from the solid waste plan under certain conditions, including:* If the site violates county laws.
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NEWS
By Kate Yanchulis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
Bobby Graves had misgivings about a pollution-control permit newly required for many farms in the state. But he applied, ready to detail how he's storing and disposing of the manure from his 110,000 chickens. Now, more than three months after seeking help from the Maryland Department of Agriculture in crafting a plan for reducing his farm's wastewater runoff — the final step needed for the permit — he's still waiting. And growing more frustrated with each passing day. "When I went in for my meeting with [a field service center]
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
The Harford County Council approved the administration's solid waste management plan last night but not before eliminating plans to reopen a controversial landfill in the fast-growing Abingdon area. The plan was approved by a vote of 6-1 after the council adopted a series of amendments, including one that eliminated the former Spencer sand and gravel pit off Abingdon Road as a landfill for construction and demolition debris. Council President Robert S. Wagner ended any suspense on the landfill issue during a public hearing an hour before the council session.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY and TED SHELSBY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2006
When the confetti drops on the General Assembly at midnight tomorrow, Del. Barry Glassman says he will breathe a sigh of relief and return to Harford County feeling some disappointment but mostly satisfaction with the delegation's accomplishments during the 90-day session. "I'd say we did pretty well," the 44-year-old chairman of the eight-member Harford County delegation said Friday. "We're a small delegation, but we were able to chalk up some wins." One victory was a bill giving the county more control over its solid-waste management plan.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Harford County is going ahead with its 10-year waste management plan, with the exception of two controversial sites that state environmental officials say must remain because of legal precedent. The County Council and County Executive David Craig dropped their appeal last week of the state's decision to reject the entire plan because the county proposed to eliminate the two sites, a former landfill in Abingdon and a gravel pit in Havre de Grace. After receiving permission from the Maryland Department of the Environment to move ahead with other aspects of the plan, county officials say they eagerly await legislation being drafted by Del. Barry Glassman to give counties more autonomy over their long-term waste management plans.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF Staff writer Tanya Jones contributed to this article | April 1, 1997
A Circuit Court judge has ordered Anne Arundel County to add a controversial landfill near Crofton to its waste management plan, opening the way for approval of a facility neighbors have fought for years.But county lawyers said yesterday they will appeal the decision by Judge Clayton Greene Jr. to the Court of Special Appeals. Greene ruled on March 26 that county officials exceeded their authority in 1994 when they excluded Warren Halle's Chesapeake landfill from the Solid Waste Management Plan.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | February 9, 1992
The Harford County Council voted, 7-0, Tuesday night to ask Maryland's highest court for a ruling on whether the county can block a proposed Gravel Hill Road asbestos and rubble landfill.Two weeks ago, the council lost its appeal to the Court of Special Appeals, which ruled the council exceeded its authority in 1990 by removing the proposed rubble fill from its solid waste management plan.In that opinion, a three-judge panel of the state's second-highest court upheld a ruling by Harford Circuit Judge Cypert O. Whitfill, who said it was up to the state Department of the Environment to approve landfill sites.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 3, 1992
The few Carroll residents who attended a public meeting on environmental issues last night came to express concerns about the commissioners looking into a waste-to-energy plant.Among those who raised concerns about incinerators and their effects on the environment were Steve Boyan of Marriottsville and Westminster Councilwoman Rebecca Orenstein.Only five people attended the meeting at the County Office Building, and only two of them spoke. It was the county Environmental Affairs Advisory Board's first night meeting to gather public comment on environmental issues.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
Irked by state rejection of Harford County's solid waste management plan, a state delegate said he plans to introduce legislation that would give counties greater control over their landfills and trash collection. Del. Barry Glassman said he plans to introduce a bill in the next General Assembly session that would give counties the authority to remove waste facilities from their long-term waste management plans. The proposal comes in the wake of the Maryland Department of the Environment rejecting Harford's waste management plan after the county removed a provision for the proposed expansion of a landfill in the center of one of the county's fastest-growing residential areas.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
The county commissioners adopted yesterday a 10-year plan to extend the life of Carroll's Northern Landfill by recycling liquid waste and converting building debris into road construction material.After minor revisions, the 1999 Solid Waste Management Plan will be forwarded next month to the Maryland Department of the Environment, county officials said.The agency must approve the 271-page document before it can be implemented. The approval process is expected to take about 60 days."The bottom line is, we want to do things that will slow the use of the landfill's existing space or recapture some of the space," Gary Horst, the county's director of enterprise and recreation services, told the commissioners during a brief public hearing yesterday on the waste management plan.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Harford County is going ahead with its 10-year waste management plan, with the exception of two controversial sites that state environmental officials say must remain because of legal precedent. The County Council and County Executive David Craig dropped their appeal last week of the state's decision to reject the entire plan because the county proposed to eliminate the two sites, a former landfill in Abingdon and a gravel pit in Havre de Grace. After receiving permission from the Maryland Department of the Environment to move ahead with other aspects of the plan, county officials say they eagerly await legislation being drafted by Del. Barry Glassman to give counties more autonomy over their long-term waste management plans.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
Irked by state rejection of Harford County's solid waste management plan, a state delegate said he plans to introduce legislation that would give counties greater control over their landfills and trash collection. Del. Barry Glassman said he plans to introduce a bill in the next General Assembly session that would give counties the authority to remove waste facilities from their long-term waste management plans. The proposal comes in the wake of the Maryland Department of the Environment rejecting Harford's waste management plan after the county removed a provision for the proposed expansion of a landfill in the center of one of the county's fastest-growing residential areas.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Harford County is fighting efforts by the state to force a reopening of a 75-year-old landfill near fast-growing Abingdon that neighbors want closed but state officials insist remain part of the county's official waste management plan. The appeal is the latest development in a continuing fight over the reopening of a landfill in an area that has undergone significant residential growth over the past decade. County Executive David R. Craig and County Council President Robert S. Wagner signed a letter to the head of the state Department of the Environment asking him to reconsider the decision to reject the solid waste management plan because it did not include Spencer rubble landfill.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
The Harford County Council approved the administration's solid waste management plan last night but not before eliminating plans to reopen a controversial landfill in the fast-growing Abingdon area. The plan was approved by a vote of 6-1 after the council adopted a series of amendments, including one that eliminated the former Spencer sand and gravel pit off Abingdon Road as a landfill for construction and demolition debris. Council President Robert S. Wagner ended any suspense on the landfill issue during a public hearing an hour before the council session.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
Harford County's proposed solid waste management plan calls for four rubble collection sites, including the reopening of a controversial landfill in the fast-growing Abingdon area. There is already growing opposition, among residents and County Council members, to a plan to use the Spencer sand and gravel pit off Abingdon Road as a landfill for construction and demolition debris. "That's not the place for a landfill," said Council President Robert S. Wagner. "The population has grown significantly in that area since the site was closed in the early 1990s."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
Plans for a controversial and bitterly opposed recycling center near two elementary schools and a middle school in Magnolia have been spiked, according to county officials. The so-called Wiggins project, a plan to locate a waste recycling plant at the Harford Sands Inc. property off Fort Hoyle Road, will not be included in the county's new solid waste plan, said Frank Henderson, deputy director of environmental affairs at the Department of Public Works. "It won't be in the plan at that site," he said.
NEWS
By JAMES J. RILEY | May 1, 1994
The Citizen Advisory Committee for Anne Arundel County Solid Waste Management Plan was formed in December 1992 and was charged with making recommendations to the county government for the development of a comprehensive solid-waste management plan.This action was mandated by the state requirement that each county and the city of Baltimore present a plan of action with respect to all types of solid waste and all phases of solid waste management for the succeeding 10-year period.The CAC held semi-monthly meetings and has met for more than 200 hours.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
Carroll commissioners adopted yesterday a 10-year plan to extend the life of the county's Northern Landfill by recycling liquid waste and converting building debris into road construction material.After minor revisions, the 1999 Solid Waste Management Plan will be forwarded next month to the Maryland Department of the Environment, county officials said.The agency must approve the 271-page document before it can be implemented. The approval process is expected to take about 60 days."The bottom line is, we want to do things that will slow the use of the landfill's existing space or recapture some of the space," Gary Horst, the county's director of enterprise and recreation services, told the commissioners during a brief public hearing yesterday on the waste management plan.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
The Department of Public Works has canceled a scheduled public hearing before the County Council on Tuesday on its solid waste management plan that included two controversial recycling projects in the Joppa and Joppatowne areas. Gerald Scanlan, chief of the Department of Public Works' solid waste division, said the plan is being pulled off the agenda to give the agency more time to meet with residents to discuss it. Kim Ayres, Scanlan's administrative assistant, said no dates have been established for the public meeting, which will be held before the plan goes to the council.
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