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NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | March 15, 1991
The emotional battle over a $26 million Hawkins Point medical waste incinerator now moves to Maryland's highest court.The Maryland Court of Appeals' decision to review the case comes 17 months after a Circuit Court judge dismissed an environmental group's challenge of state permits needed to operate the incinerator.Acting on an appeal by the incinerator's developer, Medical WasteAssociates, the state's highest court agreed to review a Court of Special Appeals ruling. That court, the state's second-highest, held last November that the Maryland Waste Coalition, a North County-based environmental group, could sue under the Maryland Environmental Standing Act.The Maryland Waste Coalition's effort to stop operation ofthe incinerator hinges on the Court of Appeals' finding the group has legal standing and sending the case back to the Circuit Court.
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NEWS
October 23, 2011
The Sun's recent editorial on incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). implies that an environmental group's recent report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators exposes new data that Maryland's governor should have utilized to decide not to raise WTE to a Tier 1 renewable energy source. I disagree. The release of this report does not change the landscape of the debate. The report itself merely represents one advocacy group's cherry-picked analysis of a complex issue.
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NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | February 10, 1991
The company that built a controversial $26 million Hawkins Point medical waste incinerator repeatedly violated toxic emissions standards at a Maine incinerator ultimately demolished because of design flaws.Richmond, Va.-based Consumat Systems Inc.'s serious design flaws,years of lax maintenance and improper operating procedures resulted in a lengthy court fight and forced Auburn, Maine, to tear down the incinerator last spring, officials there said.Consumat's Maine woes have troubled opponents of the company's latest project, the Hawkins Point medical waste incinerator, completed in October just across Anne Arundel's northeast border in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
The former site of a waste incinerator in Northeast Baltimore could be developed into a big-box store or warehouses or a combination under a plan being proposed by construction magnate Willard Hackerman, who has a contract to purchase the vacant, 19-acre site on Pulaski Highway from the city for more than $1 million. Hackerman, president and chief executive of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., has asked the city to designate the 6709 Pulaski Highway parcel a planned unit development, which would allow him to proceed with one of three scenarios.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Over opposition from Curtis Bay and Brooklyn residents, a sharply divided Baltimore City Council approved a bill last night allowing the incinerator at Hawkins Point to collect medical waste from any city within 250 miles of the facility.The council's 11-8 vote rolled back statutes that limited Hawkins Point Medical Waste Incinerator in South Baltimore to receiving trash from a handful of Maryland counties.The bill was discussed for almost two hours before the vote.Supporters said the incinerator has been burning 67 tons of trash daily, far below the 150-ton-a-day limit set by the state and needed to take in more waste to become profitable.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | June 30, 1991
Undaunted by the combination of touring a smelly waste incinerator on a day that was already an inferno, two of Carroll's commissioners left the Harford Waste-to-Energy Facility Friday with a sweeter attitude toward such a plant in their own county.Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy Jr. said he was very encouraged to hear the plant doesn't preclude aggressive recycling and composting.For several months, commissioners have been planning to visit waste-to-energy plants. Friday's tour of the 3 1/2-year-old Harford plant was the first, with a September visit planned to a much newer one in Fairfax County, Va.Inside the Harford plant, about 900 tons of garbage covered about a quarter of the wide area called the "tipping floor," waiting to be loaded into four incinerators and come out the other end as ash.The ash, about one-eighth the volume of the trash before it was burned, is buried in a landfill.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | April 10, 1991
Stung by a municipal zoning violation notice, the owners of a $26 million medical-waste incinerator in Hawkins Point have threatened to sue the city so they can burn out-of-state wastes at the plant."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
A group of more than 50 residents of the Curtis Bay neighborhood in Baltimore called yesterday for the closure of a medical waste incinerator that has repeatedly violated legal limits for mercury air pollution. "Allowing Phoenix [Services Inc.] to continue to emit pollution is like letting me dump garbage on my neighbor's lawn -- except that in Phoenix's case, the pollution is toxic," Patrick Moylan, president of Concerned Citizens for a Better Brooklyn, told the audience at a news conference at the Curtis Bay Recreation Center on Filbert Street.
NEWS
September 25, 1991
The Baltimore Board of Zoning Appeals yesterday effectively put a controversial Hawkins Point incinerator out of business.Ruling thatMedical Waste Associates failed to meet standards for a medical waste incinerator and was in violation of city ordinances, the board refused to grant a use-and-occupancy permit.The $26 million medical waste incinerator is located in South Baltimore, just over the Anne Arundel border. It was built one year ago.Residents and environmentalists have been trying to have the incinerator shut down ever since it was proposed.
NEWS
March 8, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke today ordered the $26 million medical waste incinerator in Hawkins Point to stop accepting out-of-state hospital waste immediately or shut down, a spokesman for the mayor said.After meeting this morning with angry residents of southern city neighborhoods, Schmoke said the incinerator developed by Medical Waste Associates was violating a city zoning ordinance that bars it from accepting waste from outside the Baltimore area, reported Clinton Coleman, the mayor's press secretary.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
A group of more than 50 residents of the Curtis Bay neighborhood in Baltimore called yesterday for the closure of a medical waste incinerator that has repeatedly violated legal limits for mercury air pollution. "Allowing Phoenix [Services Inc.] to continue to emit pollution is like letting me dump garbage on my neighbor's lawn -- except that in Phoenix's case, the pollution is toxic," Patrick Moylan, president of Concerned Citizens for a Better Brooklyn, told the audience at a news conference at the Curtis Bay Recreation Center on Filbert Street.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 28, 2000
DENVER -- The Energy Department said yesterday it was abandoning a plan to build the country's first nuclear-waste incinerator in southern Idaho, a decision that was hailed by environmental groups that used considerable political and financial might to fight the plan. The decision was part of the settlement of a lawsuit the groups had filed against the department seeking to stop construction of the incinerator, or failing that, to collect $1 billion in damages if it began operating. The plaintiffs had been largely concerned that the wind might blow radioactive and toxic dust across western Wyoming.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has vetoed legislation that would have placed additional restrictions on the amount of medical waste allowed into a South Baltimore incinerator.The Baltimore City Council failed to override the mayor's veto Monday night, falling six votes shy of the 15 needed.Schmoke's veto ends a two-year battle over the boundaries for the Hawkins Point Medical Waste Incinerator. Last year, the council passed a law allowing the owners of the facility, Phoenix Services Inc., to expand their collection boundaries to a 250-mile radius.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Despite a glaring loophole that could allow Baltimore to become a dumping ground for medical waste from around the country, the City Council gave its blessing last night to easing the limits on an incinerator at Hawkins Point.Detractors failed in a testy, last-minute attempt to correct the legislation's vague wording that opens the door for shipping in medical waste from anywhere in the nation.The bill, given final approval in a 10-7 vote, allows the Hawkins Point Medical Waste Incinerator in South Baltimore to collect trash from any municipality within 250 miles instead of just a handful of Maryland counties.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Over opposition from Curtis Bay and Brooklyn residents, a sharply divided Baltimore City Council approved a bill last night allowing the incinerator at Hawkins Point to collect medical waste from any city within 250 miles of the facility.The council's 11-8 vote rolled back statutes that limited Hawkins Point Medical Waste Incinerator in South Baltimore to receiving trash from a handful of Maryland counties.The bill was discussed for almost two hours before the vote.Supporters said the incinerator has been burning 67 tons of trash daily, far below the 150-ton-a-day limit set by the state and needed to take in more waste to become profitable.
NEWS
January 11, 1997
Taxpayers are footing defense firms' billsI can understand the military spending $500 for a toilet seat if that seat is one that is only designed for an aircraft's limited space and is about two inches shorter and a quarter-inch thinner than a $12 variety sold by any of the local mall merchants.I was appalled to read in The Sun that Defense Secretary William Perry and Director of Central Intelligence John Deutch approved of the government paying costs for the Boeing-McDonnell Douglas merger.
NEWS
June 7, 1993
Arundel may ask Baltimore for impact study on incineratorThe Anne Arundel County Council is to consider a resolution tonight calling on Baltimore to study the impact on county residents of a Hawkins Point medical waste incinerator before allowing the facility to expand its "catchment" area. The incinerator wants to be allowed to accept medical waste from outside the metropolitan area.Opponents of the medical waste incinerator, including the Glen Burnie-based nonprofit Maryland Waste Coalition, want the County Council to issue a stronger condemnation of the Medical Waste Associates incinerator, which lies just north of the city-county line.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | September 12, 1990
Opponents of a $26 million Hawkins Point medical waste incinerator have asked the Maryland Court of Special Appeals for the right to argue their case before a jury.The Maryland Waste Coalition, an alliance of southern Baltimore City and northern Anne Arundel residents, is appealing an October 1989 decision by a Baltimore City Circuit Court judge who ruled that state law does not allow citizens to mount a court challenge to state environmental officials' decisions to issue air-quality permits.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1996
All three 6th District councilmen say they have little choice but to back a controversial City Council bill that could double the amount of waste burned at Maryland's largest medical waste incinerator.But are they telling residents of Brooklyn and Curtis Bay -- where the bill to boost burning at the Hawkins Point facility faces its stiffest opposition -- the whole story? Or are they presenting residents with a false choice?"No," insists Councilman Edward L. Reisinger. "If we don't go forward with this, you're going to have a lot of hospitals that will have to burn medical waste and really pollute the air," he said.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1996
The operators of the Hawkins Point Medical Waste Incinerator -- which has come under fierce criticism from local environmentalists and neighborhood leaders -- have reduced emissions of pollutants by about half over the past two years, according to public records and interviews.Since new operators, under the name Phoenix Services Inc., took charge of the facility two years ago, there have been no violations or warnings issued against the incinerator, according to state environmental officials.
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