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By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 2003
Here we come a-wassailing" -- or maybe by this time in the holiday season, it's more accurately "there they went." Either way, it's really not too late to enjoy a cup of wassail. In fact, in many places the custom is associated more with January and Twelfth Night festivities than with caroling at Christmastime. Wassailing is a group activity, a way of greeting and toasting friends, so the wassail bowl became something of a symbol of community good will and hospitality. The word wassail harks back to old Anglo-Saxon and even Viking days, when earlier versions of the word were used as common greetings meaning "be healthy.
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NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
I believe Christmas shopping is not for the faint of heart. No, it is for the warriors. There are a few keys to victory: You must have a written plan and a strategy for success. Above all, you must stay the course. You cannot cut and run, no matter how many people are waiting in line at the store. If you do, someone else will be walking away with your special buy and there will be no rainchecks available. Tried-and-true veterans of holiday shopping, like myself, begin planning their campaign around Thanksgiving.
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NEWS
December 13, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer took a break from football stadium wars to welcome visitors to the annual Governor's Mansion open house yesterday.As the St. Mary's College Choir sang Christmas carols on the front stairs, Mr. Schaefer and his companion, Hilda Mae Snoops, welcomed about 1,000 guests.Visitors toured the first floor of the mansion and helped themselves to cookies and wassail in the dining room, said Page Boinest, the governor's spokeswoman. That's about the same number of guests who attended the open house last year.
FEATURES
December 7, 2006
Museum Go wassailing at the Walters Go Wassail at the Walters tonight from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Walters Art Museum. You'll get a chance to sip wassail (warm cider), munch on cookies, catch a live musical performance by a local choir, do craft activities and take guided tours of the museum at 600 N. Charles St. Call 410-547-9000 or visit thewalters.org.
FEATURES
December 7, 2006
Museum Go wassailing at the Walters Go Wassail at the Walters tonight from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Walters Art Museum. You'll get a chance to sip wassail (warm cider), munch on cookies, catch a live musical performance by a local choir, do craft activities and take guided tours of the museum at 600 N. Charles St. Call 410-547-9000 or visit thewalters.org.
NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | December 17, 1996
We consider hanging lightsand decorationson our ficus tree this year;no children will be here --they're over 30; they all work,and Christmas comesmidweek. The pricetag on one Douglas firastounds us annually,especially when, New Year's Day,we toss it out,long after it has droppedits load of needles on our floor.*It seems we just packedall the ornaments away and sangthe Wassail and God Rest Ye.But Joy to the World, we singin the car on the way to the lot wherea scout troop is selling fir trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | December 1, 2005
HOLIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS It's quite literally a monumental night. Tonight, after the sun goes down, the lights are coming up at the lighting of the Washington Monument in Mount Vernon. A Monumental Occasion kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with live performances by the Handel Choir, Baltimore City College Choir, Sounds of Downtown and other local singers, strolling entertainment, a holiday village of vendors offering food as well as holiday crafts and knickknacks. Then at 6:25 p.m., the lighting ceremony begins with Mayor Martin O'Malley and director John Waters flipping the switch to light the monument.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | December 9, 1990
It may be a hallowed New Year's Eve tradition to "take a cup of kindness yet for auld lang syne," but there are times when the side effect ranges anywhere from uncomfortable to lethal.That is why several area bartenders have joined forces with First Night Annapolis to create some non-alcoholic cups that, while kind, will enhance the party without rendering the party-goer inoperative the next day.Recently, First Night Annapolis Inc. displayed the fruits of their labors at a taste testing upstairs at Middleton's Tavern in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
There are times when cranberries have a hard time finding a place at the table. Not as holiday season approaches. This time of year, no feast is complete without them. But why confine cranberries to the table? These little berries pack enough flavor to liven up feast-day beverages at least as merrily as they complement the turkey and trimmings. Cranberry juice now comes in two colors. The traditional red has been joined by white cranberry juice, which is pressed from berries harvested a few weeks before they turn crimson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | December 7, 2006
CONSIDER THE NARWHAL Perhaps one of the most unusual-looking creatures on Earth, the narwhal is a wonder of nature. The male narwhal, often dubbed the "unicorn of the sea," grows a 5-foot tusk through its upper jaw and lip. This curious whale is the subject of the newest exhibit, The Narwhal: A Whale of a Tooth, at the National Museum of Dentistry. Opening this weekend, the exhibit features a life-sized (13-foot-long) model of a male narwhal, documentary photos and information on the whale's unusual tooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | December 7, 2006
CONSIDER THE NARWHAL Perhaps one of the most unusual-looking creatures on Earth, the narwhal is a wonder of nature. The male narwhal, often dubbed the "unicorn of the sea," grows a 5-foot tusk through its upper jaw and lip. This curious whale is the subject of the newest exhibit, The Narwhal: A Whale of a Tooth, at the National Museum of Dentistry. Opening this weekend, the exhibit features a life-sized (13-foot-long) model of a male narwhal, documentary photos and information on the whale's unusual tooth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | December 1, 2005
HOLIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS It's quite literally a monumental night. Tonight, after the sun goes down, the lights are coming up at the lighting of the Washington Monument in Mount Vernon. A Monumental Occasion kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with live performances by the Handel Choir, Baltimore City College Choir, Sounds of Downtown and other local singers, strolling entertainment, a holiday village of vendors offering food as well as holiday crafts and knickknacks. Then at 6:25 p.m., the lighting ceremony begins with Mayor Martin O'Malley and director John Waters flipping the switch to light the monument.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
There are times when cranberries have a hard time finding a place at the table. Not as holiday season approaches. This time of year, no feast is complete without them. But why confine cranberries to the table? These little berries pack enough flavor to liven up feast-day beverages at least as merrily as they complement the turkey and trimmings. Cranberry juice now comes in two colors. The traditional red has been joined by white cranberry juice, which is pressed from berries harvested a few weeks before they turn crimson.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 2003
Here we come a-wassailing" -- or maybe by this time in the holiday season, it's more accurately "there they went." Either way, it's really not too late to enjoy a cup of wassail. In fact, in many places the custom is associated more with January and Twelfth Night festivities than with caroling at Christmastime. Wassailing is a group activity, a way of greeting and toasting friends, so the wassail bowl became something of a symbol of community good will and hospitality. The word wassail harks back to old Anglo-Saxon and even Viking days, when earlier versions of the word were used as common greetings meaning "be healthy.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | January 1, 2003
It was just a stray remark in a newspaper article -- one British wine writer praising an American wine writer but with the caveat that the Yank didn't have much of a palate for Burgundy. To some, it was as if the British writer had ground Old Glory in the dust while drinking Chateau Petrus on the rocks. Fans of the American writer were livid, posting message after message on an Internet bulletin board venting their outrage at the presumption of the Englishman. Critics of the American replied in kind, all but implying he should be sued for critical malpractice if he ever chews on another Beaune.
NEWS
By Joyce S. Brown | December 17, 1996
We consider hanging lightsand decorationson our ficus tree this year;no children will be here --they're over 30; they all work,and Christmas comesmidweek. The pricetag on one Douglas firastounds us annually,especially when, New Year's Day,we toss it out,long after it has droppedits load of needles on our floor.*It seems we just packedall the ornaments away and sangthe Wassail and God Rest Ye.But Joy to the World, we singin the car on the way to the lot wherea scout troop is selling fir trees.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | December 12, 1993
Rockwood Museum is a 19th-century country estate and one of Wilmington's most interesting attractions. Christmas at Rockwood attracts visitors each year to see the decorations and observe family life during holiday time at the turn of the century. The manor house, built in 1851 by merchant-banker Joseph Shipley, was patterned on an English country house. The estate includes a porter's lodge, gardener's cottage, barn and other outbuildings.The mansion itself is filled with English, Continental and American decorative arts from the 17th to 19th centuries.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | January 1, 2003
It was just a stray remark in a newspaper article -- one British wine writer praising an American wine writer but with the caveat that the Yank didn't have much of a palate for Burgundy. To some, it was as if the British writer had ground Old Glory in the dust while drinking Chateau Petrus on the rocks. Fans of the American writer were livid, posting message after message on an Internet bulletin board venting their outrage at the presumption of the Englishman. Critics of the American replied in kind, all but implying he should be sued for critical malpractice if he ever chews on another Beaune.
FEATURES
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
The sacrifices some people make for art.Wearing a plumed hat, tunic and tights, Herb Ridder sings madrigals and meanders among the diners gathered in a vaulted church hall for the Bach Society of Baltimore's fifth annual Renaissance-style feast."
NEWS
December 13, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer took a break from football stadium wars to welcome visitors to the annual Governor's Mansion open house yesterday.As the St. Mary's College Choir sang Christmas carols on the front stairs, Mr. Schaefer and his companion, Hilda Mae Snoops, welcomed about 1,000 guests.Visitors toured the first floor of the mansion and helped themselves to cookies and wassail in the dining room, said Page Boinest, the governor's spokeswoman. That's about the same number of guests who attended the open house last year.
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