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NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | August 22, 2010
A 28-year-old man was in critical but stable condition at an area hospital Sunday after an early-morning shooting in the Washington Village neighborhood of Baltimore, police said. Officers called to the intersection of Carey and James streets at about 1 a.m. found the man suffering from gunshot wounds to the arms and torso, police said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Thursday's docket for the board of liquor license commissioners for Baltimore City was mostly concerned with infractions of the liquor board code. Among the establishments penalized by the board, all for first-time offenses, were Canton's Portside Tavern on O'Donnell St., which was fined $625 for after-hours consumption on April 7, Phillips Seafood in the Inner Harbor , which was fined $250 for operating without a license on May 7, and the Chesapeake in Charles North, which was found guilty of extending its bar outside on July 19 and 20 Artscape without permission from the liquor board.
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NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 26, 2006
A long-simmering feud over what to call the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood that sometimes goes by Pigtown, sometimes by Washington Village and other times by a hyphenated hookup of the two, erupted recently in the unlikeliest of spots. This brawl over authenticity, pride and, of course, pigs overwhelmed an otherwise subdued hearing on - of all things - Pigtown's application to the National Register of Historic Places. Name game Do you have a better name for Pigtown? Submit your suggestion at baltimoresun.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
A two-alarm fire burned three homes in the city's Washington Village/Pigtown neighborhood on Friday morning, according to the Baltimore Fire Department. Firefighters responded to the scene in the 1100 block of Ward St. shortly after 6 a.m. and found heavy smoke and flames, a dispatcher said. The fire extended to three homes — all of which were believed to be vacant — before being brought under control at 7:12 a.m., the dispatcher said. No injuries were reported to civilians or firefighters, he said.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 17, 2010
A new city health department program announced today aims to tackle the longtime problem of Baltimore neighborhoods that lack supermarkets in a novel way -- by bringing fresh produce and healthy supermarket fare to residents through a free delivery system that operates with the click of a mouse from the library. The Virtual Supermarket Project offers library laptops where residents can order groceries online from Santoni's Super Market in Highlandtown and pick them up at the Orleans Street library the next day. The program offers a second location at the Washington Village library in West Baltimore, another neighborhood the health department calls a "food desert" for its scarcity of grocery stores and healthy food options.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
In a rare occurrence highlighting Baltimore's arcane residential ground rents, a house in up-and-coming Washington Village was auctioned yesterday for $98,000 after the homeowners failed to pay ground rent of a few hundred dollars. The owners of the ground rent, Irvin and Sharon Caplan, sold the Glyndon Avenue rowhouse after winning control of the property through a lengthy court process and will pocket the net proceeds of the sale. The previous homeowners, who had no mortgage on the home, get nothing.
NEWS
October 21, 1999
Two hundred city welfare recipients and noncustodial parents will participate in job training, placement and retention programs under a federal grant of about $1.2 million awarded recently to the Enterprise Foundation's "Ready, Work, Grow" program.Participants must live in Cherry Hill, Druid Heights, Sandtown-Winchester, Washington Village/Pigtown or East Baltimore-Midway; be registered with the Department of Social Services; or be the father of a child whose mother receives welfare.For participation in the program, Enterprise Baltimore has targeted three community development corporations -- Tri-Churches Housing Inc., Cherry Hill New Creations and Druid Heights CDC -- and six employment service providers -- EDEN Jobs, Genesis Jobs, Washington Village/Pigtown Family Support and Career Center, Damascus Career Center, Payne Memorial Outreach Inc. and Sylvan Learning Systems.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
As a downtown football stadium moves closer to reality, residents of nearby streets are demanding remedies to the trash, noise, traffic and parking problems they said will plague their southwest neighborhoods when the game returns to Baltimore.About 70 residents of Pigtown, Washington Village, Ridgely's Delight and other communities gathered in a church basement last night to voice concerns about the negative impact of football crowds -- and to demand some of the stadium jobs and beautification projects.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 30, 2002
From Randallstown to Greektown, communities in Baltimore County and Baltimore City were awarded more than $2.2 million in grants yesterday as part of the state's Smart Growth program to rebuild older communities. The awards, announced by Gov. Parris N. Glendening at a housing conference in Baltimore, were part of $15.5 million awarded to jurisdictions statewide. In the city, grants will be used to help homeowners upgrade their properties in Brooklyn-Curtis Bay, to renovate the Woman's Industrial Exchange downtown, to revitalize Belvedere Square, and to launch facade improvement programs in Greektown and Washington Village/Pigtown.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
At least one student at George Washington Elementary in southwest Baltimore has been diagnosed with scarlet fever, according to the city health department. A letter was sent home to parents Thursday detailing the illness' symptoms. Scarlet fever is a common infection caused by streptococcus bacteria and spread by person-to-person contact, coughing and sneezing, according to the letter. The illness can be treated with antibiotics. If left untreated, complications such as rheumatic fever and kidney disease may ensue, the letter says.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake has received a $1 million grant from The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, of Owings Mills, that will go toward building and rehabbing homes in Baltimore. “We are proud to receive support from the Weinberg Foundation to assist the financially disadvantaged and vulnerable individuals and families in our homeownership program,” said Habitat Chesapeake CEO Mike Posko. The grant will go toward rehabilitating 56 vacant properties over two years, Posko said in a statement.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | March 26, 2012
As I try to recall the moment when my concern really set in, I remember walking into a dark, narrow hallway inside the front door of a brick rowhouse in Pigtown. My real estate agent, Clay Tucker, scanned the walls for the light switch. When he found it, I almost wished he hadn't. We passed by the dingy white, peeling walls to the winding staircase for the second-floor, $975-a-month apartment. I scanned the no-frills place and compared the space to my house in South Carolina. Our mortgage is $1,040 a month for a three bedroom, one-and-a-half bath ranch house on a quarter acre with granite countertops, a fenced-in yard dotted with big shade trees and a car port.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
At least one student at George Washington Elementary in southwest Baltimore has been diagnosed with scarlet fever, according to the city health department. A letter was sent home to parents Thursday detailing the illness' symptoms. Scarlet fever is a common infection caused by streptococcus bacteria and spread by person-to-person contact, coughing and sneezing, according to the letter. The illness can be treated with antibiotics. If left untreated, complications such as rheumatic fever and kidney disease may ensue, the letter says.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Baltimore City is seeking a developer for two city-owned properties in the Pigtown/Washington Village urban renewal area. The properties are a former fire station and a former public bathhouse. The Baltimore Development Corp., on behalf of the city, has set Sept. 15 as the deadline for groups to submit proposals to buy and redevelop the properties, both in the 900 block of Washington Boulevard. City officials are seeking proposals for a mixed-use development that will create jobs, generate taxes, stabilize the community and help anchor the surrounding business district.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Baltimore police are investigating a shooting in Washington Village, according to a spokesman. The victim told police he was in a vehicle talking to a man standing in the 1200 block of Ward Street just before 1 a.m., said Baltimore Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi. The 22-year-old got out of his vehicle and the man shot several times, hitting him twice, said the spokesman. The victim was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for treatment, Guglielmi said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
By day, Washington Boulevard, the main street of Pigtown, has a steady stream of foot traffic, but few places for people to go. The street just off Martin Luther King Boulevard is lined with vacant store fronts, boarded or locked by iron gates. But signs of life remain, such as a coffeehouse, a dance studio, an art gallery and a graphic design office. "It's frustrating not to be able to walk out your front door" and walk to shops and restaurants. "We all live here for the convenience," said Ryan Bruchey, a nine-year Pigtown resident and member of the Barre Circle Home Owners Association.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2003
Britain's top law enforcement officer wants to copy a Baltimore community police program he learned about during his visit here in April, and has invited a city prosecutor to London next week to address more than 350 United Kingdom police officials. David Blunkett, the British home secretary, was in Baltimore three months ago to discuss homeland security and police strategies. While here, he visited Southwest Baltimore's Washington Village/Pigtown neighborhood, where a community prosecution program that operates on a tight budget caught his attention.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
Holding a slice of pepperoni pizza eaten nearly to the crust, the prosecutor stopped chewing, leaned forward and listened intently as the woman with a ponytail began to tearfully speak of her years as a drug-using prostitute. They were at a community task force meeting called to brainstorm ideas on dealing with prostitution on Baltimore streets. For Assistant State's Attorney Jennifer Etheridge, the discussion underscored how best to prosecute such a nuisance crime. "I guess listening to her kind of validates what I go for in court," Etheridge said of prostitution cases.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 18, 2010
Residents of two Baltimore neighborhoods that lack supermarkets will soon be able to order their groceries through a free delivery system that operates with the click of a mouse from the library. The new Virtual Supermarket Project, city officials' latest attempt to solve Baltimore's long-standing history of neighborhoods with little access to healthful foods, offers laptops where residents can order groceries online from Santoni's Super Market in Highlandtown and pick them up the next day at the Orleans Street or Washington Village library branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
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