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August 15, 2004
Dr. Gregory J. Gurtner, a gastroenterologist and researcher at Washington University who grew up in Baltimore and attended the Gilman School, died Wednesday in St. Louis at the age of 36. The cause was complications of multiple melanoma diagnosed 15 years ago. Dr. Gurtner was born in Buffalo, N.Y., but spent most of his youth in the Baltimore area, living in Cockeysville and attending Gilman, where he played football and lacrosse. He graduated in 1986. He received an undergraduate degree in anthropology and music from Vanderbilt University and graduated from medical school at New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y. He went to St. Louis for post-graduate training in internal medicine and gastroenterology.
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EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 24, 2013
Several volunteers from the Harford County animal rescue group No Kill Harford attended the 9th annual No Kill Conference at George Washington University Law Center. The conference was hosted by the No Kill Advocacy Center and the Animal Law Program at George Washington University. Participants attended from 44 states and several countries to learn how to improve the save rate of animals in open admission shelters in their communities. According to the No Kill Advocacy Center, more than 150 communities, representing approximately 600 cities and towns have already achieved a 90 percent or higher save rate thus far. Some of the best practices presented include high-volume, low-cost spay/neuter services, working with local rescue groups, pet retention programs (keeping pets in homes)
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
J. Arnold Feldman, who devoted much of his life to civil and human rights as a federal official and private citizen, died Monday of heart failure at Howard County General Hospital. He was 77. The Columbia resident retired in 1994 as chief of civil rights compliance in the Washington office of the Small Business Administration, and was well-known as a human rights advocate during two decades of civic involvement in Howard County. Mr. Feldman was born in Schenectady, N.Y., and raised in Woodbine, N.J., south of Atlantic City.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A young man comes to Maryland, takes some community college classes, uses his computer skills to get a job in which he gains a security clearance. Still in his 20s, he finds information about government activity that troubles him. He decides to share it with the world. In its broad outlines, the case of Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old intelligence contractor who last week revealed the existence of two top secret National Security Agency eavesdropping programs, hews closely to the contours set by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the 25-year-old soldier now being court-martialed at Fort Meade for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified documents.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A young man comes to Maryland, takes some community college classes, uses his computer skills to get a job in which he gains a security clearance. Still in his 20s, he finds information about government activity that troubles him. He decides to share it with the world. In its broad outlines, the case of Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old intelligence contractor who last week revealed the existence of two top secret National Security Agency eavesdropping programs, hews closely to the contours set by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the 25-year-old soldier now being court-martialed at Fort Meade for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified documents.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland | December 17, 2000
HIS 11TH YEAR, plus a few extra months at this end, produced a whirlwind of new experiences for Greg Hand, Ellicott City seventh-grader, baseball player and first-time wrestler on his way to being a cancer survivor. "Getting to travel outside the country" was tops, he said. "Usually, we just go to New Jersey." The Make-a-Wish Foundation sent Greg and his family on a seven-day Disney cruise in the Caribbean. Magan's Bay in St. Thomas made a huge impression. Greg also met a bunch of Washington Redskins while he was in the hospital.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Alan Mark Silbergeld, a retired Consumer Union attorney and consumer advocate who was an aficionado of vocal music, died Friday of complications from lymphoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Homeland resident was 72. "He was a leading consumer advocate on federal policy in Washington for the last 40 years," said Stephen Brobeck, Consumer Federation of America executive director and a friend. "He also loved Baltimore. " Born in Greenville, Ill., and raised in St. Louis, Mr. Silbergeld earned a government degree at Indiana University and a law degree from Washington University.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Mark Andrews, the co-founder of the National Teachers Hall of Fame, flew to Baltimore from Emporia, Kan., to honor a teacher at Roland Park Country School. But first he asked an auditorium full of students to think for a minute about a teacher who has made a difference in their lives, inspired them and pushed them toward success. Several in the auditorium whispered, "Mr. Brock. " David L. Brock, 48, science department chairman at the all-girls private school, learned Thursday that he was one of the five 2012 honorees to win induction into a society that Andrews called "the Oscars of education.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 24, 2013
Several volunteers from the Harford County animal rescue group No Kill Harford attended the 9th annual No Kill Conference at George Washington University Law Center. The conference was hosted by the No Kill Advocacy Center and the Animal Law Program at George Washington University. Participants attended from 44 states and several countries to learn how to improve the save rate of animals in open admission shelters in their communities. According to the No Kill Advocacy Center, more than 150 communities, representing approximately 600 cities and towns have already achieved a 90 percent or higher save rate thus far. Some of the best practices presented include high-volume, low-cost spay/neuter services, working with local rescue groups, pet retention programs (keeping pets in homes)
NEWS
By Emily Eakin and Emily Eakin,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. -- The George Washington University historian Elizabeth Anne Fenn has been leading an unusual double life. The proof is here at Clayton's Cross Creek BP and Service Center, where a hearty cheer goes up as she walks in, and a sweat- and grease-stained mechanic's shirt emblazoned with her nickname -- "Lil" -- dangles expectantly from the rafters. "Whatcha got there, Daniel?" asks Fenn, sidling up to a young man wrestling with the exposed underbelly of a Dodge Neon. "Rear main seal job," he replies, flashing a toothy grin.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Mark Andrews, the co-founder of the National Teachers Hall of Fame, flew to Baltimore from Emporia, Kan., to honor a teacher at Roland Park Country School. But first he asked an auditorium full of students to think for a minute about a teacher who has made a difference in their lives, inspired them and pushed them toward success. Several in the auditorium whispered, "Mr. Brock. " David L. Brock, 48, science department chairman at the all-girls private school, learned Thursday that he was one of the five 2012 honorees to win induction into a society that Andrews called "the Oscars of education.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Alan Mark Silbergeld, a retired Consumer Union attorney and consumer advocate who was an aficionado of vocal music, died Friday of complications from lymphoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Homeland resident was 72. "He was a leading consumer advocate on federal policy in Washington for the last 40 years," said Stephen Brobeck, Consumer Federation of America executive director and a friend. "He also loved Baltimore. " Born in Greenville, Ill., and raised in St. Louis, Mr. Silbergeld earned a government degree at Indiana University and a law degree from Washington University.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Sitting in a plush leather chair in a borrowed office at George Washington University Law School, Eric Menhart seems nothing more than an ambitious, third-year law student with some impressive experience under his belt. He has interned for Congress, the Federal Trade Commission and the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a Washington think tank. He's on the elections and technology committees of the American Bar Association's student division, and he started his own Web site company in college, which he sold for $21,000.
NEWS
August 15, 2004
Dr. Gregory J. Gurtner, a gastroenterologist and researcher at Washington University who grew up in Baltimore and attended the Gilman School, died Wednesday in St. Louis at the age of 36. The cause was complications of multiple melanoma diagnosed 15 years ago. Dr. Gurtner was born in Buffalo, N.Y., but spent most of his youth in the Baltimore area, living in Cockeysville and attending Gilman, where he played football and lacrosse. He graduated in 1986. He received an undergraduate degree in anthropology and music from Vanderbilt University and graduated from medical school at New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y. He went to St. Louis for post-graduate training in internal medicine and gastroenterology.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
J. Arnold Feldman, who devoted much of his life to civil and human rights as a federal official and private citizen, died Monday of heart failure at Howard County General Hospital. He was 77. The Columbia resident retired in 1994 as chief of civil rights compliance in the Washington office of the Small Business Administration, and was well-known as a human rights advocate during two decades of civic involvement in Howard County. Mr. Feldman was born in Schenectady, N.Y., and raised in Woodbine, N.J., south of Atlantic City.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
In a major expansion plan, the Johns Hopkins University has signed a letter of intent to buy the sprawling St. Paul Cos. campus that straddles the city-county line in Mount Washington. Already a major property owner and the city's largest private employer with 35,000 people, Hopkins expects to keep growing. Assuming the deal is completed, Hopkins plans eventually to use just under half of the space in five major buildings on the 68-acre campus for administrative offices for the school and the hospital, a Hopkins official said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Sitting in a plush leather chair in a borrowed office at George Washington University Law School, Eric Menhart seems nothing more than an ambitious, third-year law student with some impressive experience under his belt. He has interned for Congress, the Federal Trade Commission and the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a Washington think tank. He's on the elections and technology committees of the American Bar Association's student division, and he started his own Web site company in college, which he sold for $21,000.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
In a major expansion plan, the Johns Hopkins University has signed a letter of intent to buy the sprawling St. Paul Cos. campus that straddles the city-county line in Mount Washington. Already a major property owner and the city's largest private employer with 35,000 people, Hopkins expects to keep growing. Assuming the deal is completed, Hopkins plans eventually to use just under half of the space in five major buildings on the 68-acre campus for administrative offices for the school and the hospital, a Hopkins official said yesterday.
NEWS
By Emily Eakin and Emily Eakin,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. -- The George Washington University historian Elizabeth Anne Fenn has been leading an unusual double life. The proof is here at Clayton's Cross Creek BP and Service Center, where a hearty cheer goes up as she walks in, and a sweat- and grease-stained mechanic's shirt emblazoned with her nickname -- "Lil" -- dangles expectantly from the rafters. "Whatcha got there, Daniel?" asks Fenn, sidling up to a young man wrestling with the exposed underbelly of a Dodge Neon. "Rear main seal job," he replies, flashing a toothy grin.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland | December 17, 2000
HIS 11TH YEAR, plus a few extra months at this end, produced a whirlwind of new experiences for Greg Hand, Ellicott City seventh-grader, baseball player and first-time wrestler on his way to being a cancer survivor. "Getting to travel outside the country" was tops, he said. "Usually, we just go to New Jersey." The Make-a-Wish Foundation sent Greg and his family on a seven-day Disney cruise in the Caribbean. Magan's Bay in St. Thomas made a huge impression. Greg also met a bunch of Washington Redskins while he was in the hospital.
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