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NEWS
June 9, 2006
Betty Beale, 94, a former society columnist whose writing appeared in the Washington Star for four decades, died Wednesday at a Washington hospice. In addition to her column, which appeared four times a week in the Star, which went out of business in 1981, she had a Sunday syndicated column that was carried in as many as 90 newspapers across the country. She said that keeping her readers informed meant attending five to 10 parties a week. She covered the official dinners and receptions of eight U.S. presidents starting with Harry S. Truman.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Dale Austin, a retired Baltimore Sun reporter whose coverage of Maryland horse racing spanned a half-century and took him on assignments as far away as England, died in his sleep Friday at his Bayside Beach home. He was 81. His wife of 38 years, the former Ann Brownhill, said Mr. Austin had spent Thursday at the doctor's office and was feeling frail and "very, very tired," but the specific cause of death is unknown. Mrs. Austin said she discovered early Friday that her husband - an enthusiastic Baltimore sports fan - had gone to lie down before watching the NFL draft and never woke up. Born on St. Patrick's Day in Poteau, Okla., Mr. Austin was the son of Jefferson Davis and Eula Grace Austin.
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NEWS
August 20, 2002
Jesse M. Fentress, a retired printer who worked for the Washington Star and Washington Times during a newspaper career that spanned more than 40 years, died of Alzheimer's disease Sunday at Genesis Eldercare's Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. He was 75. Mr. Fentress, who lived in Edgewater, was born into the newspaper business in Central City, Ky., where his father was owner and publisher of the Times Argus and owned a printing plant in Gulfport, Miss. After graduating from high school in Central City, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard landing craft during the Normandy invasion.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 14, 2013
American journalism has lost a giant in the passing at 85 of Jack Germond, my longtime pal and partner in the joyful chronicling of the antics and outrages of political reformers and rogues alike over the last half-century. Long before we teamed up to write a newspaper column at the old Washington Star and then at The Baltimore Sun, and eventually to write four books on presidential campaigns, Jack was in the vanguard of holding politicians' feet to the fire. He retained a skepticism about what they told him, but with respect for the best of them and a genuine affection for the many bad boys.
NEWS
August 15, 1995
Crosby N. Boyd, 92,newspaper executiveCrosby Noyes Boyd, who worked his way up from cashier clerk at the old Washington Star Newspaper Co. to chairman of its board on his retirement, died Saturday in Cape May, N.J., of coronary artery disease. He was 92.Born in Philadelphia in 1903 and a graduate of Princeton University, he shaped his career after his grandfather, Crosby S. Noyes, who worked at the Washington-based Evening Star newspaper from 1853 to 1908.Mr. Boyd began his newspaper career in 1931 as a clerk in the cashier's office of the Star company.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
* Pierre Holmes, 81, whose voice on the BBC during World War II passed coded messages to the Resistance and was a beacon of hope for the French under occupation, died Dec. 7 of undisclosed causes in his village of L'Isle-sur-la-Sorgue in southern France. From 1942 to 1944, Mr. Holmes announced a nightly 15-minute segment from London on the British Broadcasting Corp. called "Les francais parlent aux francais" ("The French speak to the French"). Working for the Free French Forces under Gen. Charles de Gaulle, he broadcast coded messages to Resistance fighters on arms drops, attacks and other missions.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Phil Evans, city editor of the old Evening Sun during the 1960s, died of cancer May 8 at his Silver Spring home. He was 77 and had lived in Roland Park. Born Philip Morgan Evans in New York City and raised on a Dorchester County farm, he graduated from the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J. He studied for a semester at Yale University. He later drove a truck in Morocco in North Africa and served in the Army. He joined the Associated Press in Salisbury and worked in West Virginia before joining The Evening Sun as a reporter.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - It was the detail that told the story for Mary McGrory, and the tiny but exquisitely telling detail that turned the longtime newspaper columnist into one of the giants of 20th-century journalism. McGrory, who died Wednesday night at age 85, chronicled Washington life for more than five decades, bringing meticulous reporting, a lyrical, poetic style and an unwavering liberal lens to events from the Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954 to Watergate 20 years later, to President Bush's decision to invade Iraq in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman and Theo Lippman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2004
Telling Others What To Think: Recollections of a Pundit, by Edwin M. Yoder Jr. Louisiana State University Press, 267 pages, $34.95. In 1958, 24-year-old Edwin Yoder took his "first full time editorial writing job" on the Charlotte News. Previously he was editor of the Daily Tar Heel at the University of North Carolina and did some freelancing while a Rhodes scholar. For 23 years, he was a daily pundit for the News, for the Greensboro Daily News, for the Washington Star, where he was editor of the editorial page from 1975 to 1981, when the Star folded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jack W. Germond, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
I remember feeling trepidation when Jules Witcover and I, partners in writing our political column, joined The Baltimore Sun after the collapse of the Washington Star left us on the beach in August of 1981. I was aware of The Sun 's reputation for quality, and I had read the paper often in the 20 years I had been covering Washington and national politics. I knew the work of its stars - notably Phil Potter, Pat Furgurson and later Paul West - because we often were covering the same story.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Jack W. Germond, the irascible, portly columnist and commentator who was a fixture on the American political scene for nearly 50 years, including nearly 20 of them in The Baltimore Sun's Washington bureau, died Wednesday morning of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his home in Charles Town, W.Va. He was 85. "Jack was a truly dedicated reporter and had an old-fashioned relationship with politicians. He liked them, but that did not prevent him from being critical when they did bad things and behaved badly.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Major League Lacrosse announced that Denver defenseman Lee Zink (Maryland) won Warrior Defensive Player of the Week honors after the Outlaws' 14-12 win over the visiting Chesapeake Bayhawks on Saturday afternoon. One of the best shutdown defenders in the league, Zink focused on Chesapeake attackman John Grant Jr. , limiting the veteran to a single assist as Denver moved to 12-0 on the season and clinched the top seed at Championship Weekend. The 2012 Defensive Player of the Year has anchored the Outlaws, who lead the league in fewest goals against and shots against this season.
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | June 20, 2013
Cleaning out the house that my parents called their own for 57 years is, initially, an exercise in futility and heartbreak. You walk a guilt-strewn tightrope. Should we keep this or that certain artifact left behind following Dad's death in March? Or is it, at best, another inanimate object that loses its symbolic representation? Might it best be remanded to the junk pile of history? Here's the best answer I can offer: I know that I don't know. I know all that furniture they got during the Carter Administration served its purpose.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 22, 2013
Pimlico Race Course Press box renamed to honor former Sun reporter Kelly Before Sunday's first race, the Pimlico Race Course press box was renamed to include Joe Kelly , who covered horse racing for nearly 70 years before his death in November at age 94. Kelly began his career at The Baltimore Sun in the 1940s, then moved in 1955 to The Washington Star, where he spent the next 26 years. After retiring, he became the publicity director for the Maryland Million and was Pimlico's historical consultant until his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jack W. Germond, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
I remember feeling trepidation when Jules Witcover and I, partners in writing our political column, joined The Baltimore Sun after the collapse of the Washington Star left us on the beach in August of 1981. I was aware of The Sun 's reputation for quality, and I had read the paper often in the 20 years I had been covering Washington and national politics. I knew the work of its stars - notably Phil Potter, Pat Furgurson and later Paul West - because we often were covering the same story.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
After meeting with Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk and other school officials, visiting the campus in Annapolis and touring the lacrosse facilities on Wednesday, Rick Sowell needed less than 24 hours to agree to vacate his head coaching position at Stony Brook for the same post at Navy. Sowell said Navy contacted him about the vacancy "about four or five days ago. " Sowell, who became the eighth coach in the program's 104-year history, said Thursday afternoon that he wasn't too surprised at the pace of his decision.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Dale Austin, a retired Baltimore Sun reporter whose coverage of Maryland horse racing spanned a half-century and took him on assignments as far away as England, died in his sleep Friday at his Bayside Beach home. He was 81. His wife of 38 years, the former Ann Brownhill, said Mr. Austin had spent Thursday at the doctor's office and was feeling frail and "very, very tired," but the specific cause of death is unknown. Mrs. Austin said she discovered early Friday that her husband - an enthusiastic Baltimore sports fan - had gone to lie down before watching the NFL draft and never woke up. Born on St. Patrick's Day in Poteau, Okla., Mr. Austin was the son of Jefferson Davis and Eula Grace Austin.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Phil Evans, city editor of the old Evening Sun during the 1960s, died of cancer May 8 at his Silver Spring home. He was 77 and had lived in Roland Park. Born Philip Morgan Evans in New York City and raised on a Dorchester County farm, he graduated from the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J. He studied for a semester at Yale University. He later drove a truck in Morocco in North Africa and served in the Army. He joined the Associated Press in Salisbury and worked in West Virginia before joining The Evening Sun as a reporter.
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