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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Once upon a time, when a journalist's dream was more apt to center on the Great American Novel than lucrative dot-com opportunities, a young writer named John Douglass Wallop III tried his hand at fiction. He was so serious about his craft that he gave up journalism to work in his father's Washington insurance agency, selling policies by day and writing at night. His first book, "Night Light," received some nice critical notices, but it came and went without much fanfare. In 1953, he was at work on a second book, when he set it aside and dashed off, in just three months, a novel devoted to his lifelong obsession: the Washington Senators.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Arnold A. "Arnie" Heft, a minor league Orioles pitcher during the 1930s who later was an NBA referee, co-owner of the Baltimore Bullets, noted horse owner and real estate entrepreneur, died in his sleep of unknown causes March 12 at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. The former Chevy Chase resident was 94. "Never in the 10 years that I worked for him did I ever feel like I was working for him," said Tim Keefe, Mr. Heft's horse trainer. "He never put pressure on me, even though he loved to win. " "Arnie was a very friendly guy who was drawn to people, and they were drawn to him. He stood 5-7 and had a 10-foot-tall heart," said Richard Hoffberger, who had been president for 27 years of the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association.
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NEWS
February 24, 2011
June 26, 1970: Frank Robinson hit a pair of grand slams as the Orioles beat the Washington Senators.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
For five years, he played football for the Green Bay Packers and Vince Lombardi, the quintessential tough coach. So how can Tom Brown now run a youth sports camp in Salisbury that's so relaxed the kids fill out the lineups, everyone gets to play and winning doesn't matter? It makes sense to Brown, 72, a two-sport star at Maryland 50 years ago. "Vince was a teacher first," he said. "He taught us about football and about life. He told us, in retirement, to find our niche. I looked it up in the dictionary and it said a niche is something you're good at and that you like doing.
SPORTS
June 17, 1993
Fernando Valenzuela was the third and most recent rookie pitcher to start an All-Star Game when he started in 1981 in Cleveland as a member of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The others were Dave Stenhouse of the Washington Senators (started the second game in 1962 at Chicago's Wrigley Field) and the Detroit Tigers' Mark Fidrych (at Philadelphia in 1976).Former Oriole and current Tigers general manager Jerry Walker would have qualified by today's rules to have started the second game in 1959 (at the Los Angeles Coliseum)
NEWS
By BILLY JOHNSON and BILLY JOHNSON,LONG REACH HIGH SCHOOL | April 7, 2006
When a deal with the devil is made, trouble is bound to ensue. That's exactly what happened in Mount Hebron High School's production last week of Damn Yankees. An incredible cast drove this show forward, while numbers like "Six Months Out of Every Year" and "Heart" kept toes tapping in the audience. A middle-age Washington Senators fan strikes a deal with the devil, so the story goes, to become a great baseball player and help the Senators beat their rivals, the New York Yankees. He faces a choice in the end: Go back to his wife and miss the last game of the season, or help the Senators win and hand his soul to the devil.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | May 15, 2012
This is a tale about Baltimore beer barons, the owner of the Washington Senators, a silver bullet, and how the Orioles got to Baltimore. Now, with the O's generating a buzz as they fight for first place in the American League East and prepare to meet the Washington Nationals for a weekend series in D.C., it seems like a good time to spin it. I heard it some years ago when Dawson Farber Jr., a former executive at National Brewing Company who died...
NEWS
June 20, 1992
PHILADELPHIA offers a cautionary tale to Marylanders who might get overzealous in the preservation of historic landmarks.The point is that some landmarks aren't historic and, if they are, aren't worth preserving.The old state penitentiary at 22nd and Fairmount Avenues in Philadelphia is a case in point. A huge gray-granite walled and turreted fortress, the abandoned structure covers an entire city block and, in our view, blights an entire neighborhood that is trying to raise itself out of slum status.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2005
The 2nd Star folks have hit one out of the park - Whitemarsh Park, that is - with their current production of Damn Yankees, playing weekends through June 26 at Bowie Playhouse. Winner of numerous awards for its musicals, 2nd Star won the coveted Ruby Griffith Award for last season's spectacular Mame. This production of the classic feel-good show has winner written all over it: from the great tunes delivered by terrific pit musicians, to the spirited chorus and soloists on stage, to the champion execution of fantastic choreography, and finally to a strong cast from top to bottom.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | January 15, 1991
A SMALL crowd of 13,443 gathered on Firefighters Night at Memorial Stadium Sept. 10, 1971, to watch the first-place Baltimore Orioles take on the fifth-place Washington Senators. But more fans no doubt would have made the trip if they'd known this was to be the last contest (at least for the next couple of decades) between the Orioles and the Washington Senators. At the end of the 1971 season, the Senators would move to Texas. For the rivalry between the two cities, there would be no next year.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - It started out as a must-win. It eventually became a must-end. On Friday night (and Saturday morning), the Orioles and Tampa Bay Rays combined for the longest game, time-wise, in both franchises' histories, a six hour, 54-minute, 18-inning ordeal that ended on David DeJesus' single to right that gave the celebrating Rays a 5-4 win. "Long. Devastating, obviously," Orioles third baseman Manny Machado said. "Would have been much better if we would have came out with the win. But they came [out]
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
July 7, 1996: Boston's Mo Vaughn hits a three-run, game-winning home run off Orioles closer Randy Myers in the ninth inning before an announced 47,532 at Camden Yards. The 7-5 loss to the Red Sox ends an impressive streak for the playoff-bound Birds, who'd been 37-0 when leading after eight innings. July 13, 1993: The first All-Star Game played at Camden Yards ends with a cascade of boos from Orioles fans upset with the nonappearance of Mike Mussina, the team's star pitcher.
NEWS
By Dan Singer | April 20, 2013
Few people were walking around downtown Laurel Tuesday evening, but at Main Street Sports Grill, nearly every seat at the bar was taken for happy hour. Since April marks the start of Major League Baseball play, the multiple flat-screen televisions behind the bar were showing ESPN's highlights from games across the nation. However, come 7 p.m., ESPN would be replaced by coverage of two games, one featuring the Baltimore Orioles, and the other the Washington Nationals. Laurel is sandwiched between Baltimore and Washington, about a half-hour drive away from either city, and at Main Street Sports Grill, baseball loyalties were divided between the two teams.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
The Baltimore Orioles are back in town for their home opener on Friday, and this is the moment when newspaper editorialists generally wax poetic about baseball in spring, fathers and sons, the uncertain state of the national pastime and hope springing eternal. There's usually a bit about how baseball is like life, how you have brief moments of action but mostly it's about planning and anticipation and how even the greatest ballplayers and teams do not succeed much of the time. Oh, we could go on. References to baseball movies like "Field of Dreams" or "The Natural" are big, too. And there's usually a few jokes about how baseball relates to the politics of the day or maybe a famous quote or two. Like how Harry Truman once presciently warned the owner of the Washington Senators to look out for Richard Nixon's curve.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Louis Mortimer Sleater, a standout high school athlete who ended his seven-year major league pitching career with the Baltimore Orioles and was later a steel salesman, died of lung disease Monday at his Timonium home. He was 86. A left-handed knuckleballer, he played for the St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Kansas City Athletics, Milwaukee Braves and Detroit Tigers before joining the Orioles in 1958. "He was the epitome of the journeyman left-hand pitcher in the 1950s," said Phil Wood, an MASN broadcaster who lives in Glyndon.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | May 15, 2012
This is a tale about Baltimore beer barons, the owner of the Washington Senators, a silver bullet, and how the Orioles got to Baltimore. Now, with the O's generating a buzz as they fight for first place in the American League East and prepare to meet the Washington Nationals for a weekend series in D.C., it seems like a good time to spin it. I heard it some years ago when Dawson Farber Jr., a former executive at National Brewing Company who died...
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