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March 21, 1991
On the day after it was announced Katharine Graham was retiring as chief executive officer of the Washington Post Co., Mrs. Graham attended an emotional ceremony marking the sixth year of Associated Press reporter Terry Anderson's disappearance into the clutches of radical Islamic hostage-takers. Noting that Mr. Anderson had risked his life to report on the news from Lebanon, Mrs. Graham declared: "Our American name for it is guts. Terry Anderson embodies this description."Well said, by a journalist who herself has shown plenty of guts in building the Post from a lackluster newspaper into a national powerhouse finally reaping the full potential of its prime location.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NFL is considering tougher penalties for players who commit acts of domestic violence as the league continues to deal with sharp backlash for its two-game suspension of Ravens running back Ray Rice. The Washington Post, citing sources familiar with the discussions, said in a Wednesday report the suspensions could increase to four to six games for first offenders and a full season for repeat offenders, which would put them in line with the punishment for using performance-enhancing drugs.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
Michael J. Kernan, a former Washington Post writer whose off-beat and detailed feature stories graced the newspaper's Style section for 20 years, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday at his home in Bennington, Vt. The former Canton resident was 78. Born in Utica, N.Y., and raised in Clinton, N.Y., Mr. Kernan was a 1945 graduate of Deerfield Academy. He earned a bachelor's degree with honors in English from Harvard University in 1949. After leaving Harvard, he began his newspaper career on the Watertown Daily Times in upstate New York.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 14, 2014
All you need to do is look at the headlines out of Central America to see why tens of thousands of children are ending up at our border. "In Columbia (sic), Rising Violence Breeds New Doubts" (N.Y. Times); "Guatemala Seen Slipping Into a Haven For Drugs" (LA Times); "Democracy Jeopardized as New Wave of Violence Sweeps Guatemala" (AP); "The Volcano That is Guatemala" (St. Louis Post-Dispatch); "A New Dark Age for Latin America?" (Miami Herald); "Murder Soars in El Salvador" (Washington Post)
BUSINESS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | December 24, 2008
The Baltimore Sun and The Washington Post, longtime rivals in covering Maryland news, said yesterday they would begin sharing stories and photos in a deal intended to save resources for both organizations. Editors stressed that they would still compete on coverage of state government and other areas such as University of Maryland athletics. But the papers will share some suburban, national and foreign content, along with certain sports stories. "I know journalists in both newsrooms may find this anathema," said Timothy A. Franklin, editor of The Sun, "but we're talking about daily, breaking, fairly routine stories so The Sun can use its resources developing original, unique content, which I think is a key part of our future success."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Time magazine and the Washington Post engaged in a dispute yesterday over a report in Time asserting that a former Moscow bureau chief for the Post took $1,000 from the KGB and may have been co-opted by Soviet agents.The magazine published an article in this week's issue saying that the assertion about the correspondent originated in statements made by a Soviet intelligence agent, Col. Vitaly Yurchenko, who apparently defected to the West in August 1985, then made statements to U.S. intelligence officers that came under suspicion when he returned to the Soviet Union three months later.
FEATURES
By Thomas B. Rosenstiel and Thomas B. Rosenstiel,Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
Washington -- What Americans remember most about Benjamin C. Bradlee might be that little shimmy of the hipsJason Robards delivered in "All the President's Men."It was a half-tango as Mr. Robards, playing Mr. Bradlee, walked away from Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman, who had just told him they had another story threatening to topple the president of the United States.That is one thing movies do -- confuse the actor with the role. The shimmy may have been Mr. Robards' invention.But it captured something, friends say, about Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, executive editor of the Washington Post and the most famous newspaper editor of his generation, who recently announced he will retire in September after his 70th birthday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2000
The Washington Post received three of the 14 Pulitzer Prizes awarded for journalism yesterday, including the public service award for its coverage of the neglect and abuse of the mentally retarded in city group homes in Washington. The Wall Street Journal won two prizes, and the Village Voice, a free weekly newspaper in New York, was awarded the prize for international reporting for its coverage of the AIDS crisis in Africa. The Denver Post staff won the award for breaking news for its coverage of the student massacre at Columbine High School.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 5, 1997
The Washington Post sued Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday to force him to turn over six months' worth of appointment calendars and telephone records for himself and three officials close to him.The newspaper's complaint, filed in Anne Arundel Circuit Court, came more than a year after its initial requests made under the Maryland Public Information Act. The Post wants to examine "issues of access to the governor's office and campaign financing," according...
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2006
Echoing cost-cutting moves at newspapers elsewhere, The Washington Post is preparing to eliminate about 10 percent of its newsroom jobs this year through attrition and buyouts. Staff members were told of the plan to eliminate about 80 jobs in a series of meetings Thursday and yesterday with Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr., according to people who attended. Downie could not be reached for comment. In an e-mail to the staff yesterday, Post Publisher Boisfeuillet "Bo" Jones Jr. said the paper would roll out the "voluntary retirement incentive programs" in the spring, but that the details are still being worked out. "They will be offered selectively, only where the newspaper can save costs," wrote Jones, who ascribed the job-cutting plan to economic factors that have bedeviled big-city newspapers across the country.
NEWS
By Alexander Pyles and Michael Dresser | May 7, 2014
At least one issue appeared to unite three Democratic candidates for Maryland governor on Wednesday night during the first of two televised debates before the June 24 primary election. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur agreed that it's time for the Washington Redskins organization to pick a new nickname. That was a bit of a change for Gansler, who said during a Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum in February, that he hadn't taken a position but was "extremely sympathetic" to the idea of changing the name.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Denise Charrier McQuighan, a database engineer and Johns Hopkins University graduate, died of cancer March 5 at her Gaithersburg home. She was 55. Born Denise Anne Charrier in Cincinnati, she was the daughter of George Charrier, an engineer who lives in Cody, Wyo., and Jacqueline Watson Charrier, a Hunt Valley resident. Mrs. McQuighan was a 1976 graduate of Cincinnati's Western Hills High School and earned a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
December 6, 2013
Maybe we CAN all just get along. In its Going-Out Guide, The Washington Post discovers "A side of Baltimore you've never seen," by which, they mean cool places to eat, drink, see art and catch some live music. This comes after our D.C. friends have dissed our rats , waxed condescending about our attractions and trashed sainted chef Spike Gjerde's new restaurant . (Oh, wait. We did, too. ) But Post writer Lavanya Ramanathan sounds earnest in her interest in Baltimore, and she took the time to speak (and listen)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Looks like the French may not be flocking to Charm City anytime soon. Seems Baltimore's not really a safe destination, at least as far as the French foreign ministry is concerned. Just as our state department warns about Americans traveling to certain places (it suggests avoiding North Korea, for example), the French are urged to exercise caution in certain U.S. locales. And what do the French say about Baltimore? "Considered a dangerous city except Downtown. " But don't feel too bad; few American cities fared that much better.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger will make a decision about whether to seek the Democratic nomination for governor next month -- an effort he would undertake to ensure a Baltimore-area candidate is in the race, he said in an interview with The Washington Post . "A lot of people have said, 'Dutch, you've got to do this,'" Ruppersberger told The Post . "It's good to have representation from both sides of the state. It's good to have a balance. " The former Baltimore County executive has been flirting with the idea of his first statewide run for months, though he has yet to establish a campaign or fundraising apparatus.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Douglas F. Gansler denied Tuesday reports that he routinely told his state police drivers to speed and run red lights, calling the head of the unit that protects high-ranking officials a "henchman" of Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown. Gansler, who as attorney general is the state's highest-ranking law enforcement official, called a Washington Post article based on Maryland State Police documents "100 percent, completely untrue.
NEWS
By William K. Marimow and William K. Marimow,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
In an era when news of complex and important issues is all too often reported in 15-second television news stories and articles offering little nuance and even less analysis, the work of serious journalists - both their formidable triumphs like Watergate and their distressing disasters - reinforce for us all why the First Amendment so forcefully spells out our rights of free speech and a free press.At the core of the First Amendment is the belief that discussion, debate and dissection of public affairs should be - in the words of Supreme Court Justice William Brennan - "uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."
FEATURES
December 6, 2013
Maybe we CAN all just get along. In its Going-Out Guide, The Washington Post discovers "A side of Baltimore you've never seen," by which, they mean cool places to eat, drink, see art and catch some live music. This comes after our D.C. friends have dissed our rats , waxed condescending about our attractions and trashed sainted chef Spike Gjerde's new restaurant . (Oh, wait. We did, too. ) But Post writer Lavanya Ramanathan sounds earnest in her interest in Baltimore, and she took the time to speak (and listen)
NEWS
Staff reports | October 13, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on Sunday disputed published reports that, over several years, he ordered state troopers to drive in an unsafe manner while they were transporting him on official duty. The reports, published Sunday in the Washington Post, say according to accounts by Maryland State Police, GanslerĀ  -- now a Democratic candidate for governor -- ordered troopers to drive with lights and sirens on the way to appointments, and also told them to speed, run red lights and drive on highway shoulders to get through traffic jams.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
If there was any doubt about how cowed America is by the gun lobby, it was erased today by Howard Schultz, the president, chairman and CEO of Starbucks Coffee Company. After months of controversy over whether patrons should openly be allowed to carry firearms in the company's stores, Mr. Schultz issued an open letter to his fellow Americans announcing that he would not adopt a no-weapons policy but would kindly request that customers keep their guns at home. The letter appeared (among other places)
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