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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A federal judge denied on Monday a request to strip the U.S. Naval Academy superintendent of his authority to decide whether to prosecute a sexual assault case involving three former Navy football players. "For me to stick my nose in the Navy's business at this time would be inappropriate," said U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander as she ruled from the bench. A female midshipmen who accused three classmates of assaulting her at an off-campus party in Annapolis in 2012 asked the court to remove the superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael Miller, from the case.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
A midshipman who says she was sexually assaulted by three members of the Naval Academy football team is scheduled to testify at a preliminary hearing Wednesday. The woman has told investigators that she remembers little of the alleged assault last year, which her attorney says occurred after she became intoxicated at an off-campus party in Annapolis. Vice Adm. Michael Miller, the academy superintendent, has ordered the Article 32 hearing to help him determine whether to send the accused to court-martial.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
The guy with the big fork wore a Terps polo shirt as red as the sausage he was grilling. His buddy, a retiree in a blue Navy football jersey, stood nearby, hoisting a beer and laughing. The two were gearing up for a game that was supposed to reignite a 105-year football rivalry — by grilling together. "Sometimes you have to be nice to the less fortunate," said Bob Billig, the Maryland fan, when asked why he would tailgate with Navy supporter Steve Rigterink. In the parking lot east of M&T Bank Stadium, where thousands of fans slung Frisbees and footballs, cooked chicken and burgers and hovered near coolers before kickoff, the bright afternoon sun felt more sizzling than any sense of animosity between fan bases that have, at times over the decades, felt something less than affection for each other.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | March 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a conversation taped by an investigator, standout Navy quarterback Lamar S. Owens Jr. tearfully apologized to the fellow midshipman he is accused of raping after admitting that he had sex with her in her Naval Academy dorm room. On the tape, played by prosecutors at a hearing yesterday to determine whether there is enough evidence for a court-martial, Owens was emotional and apologized often, at one point saying: "I'm so sorry. ... I woke up the next day and I called you, and I wanted to kill myself and I still feel like that."
NEWS
By Justin George, John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
John Johnson could have retired from the Washington Navy Yard years ago, but he loved the work. Richard Michael Ridgell, a former Maryland state trooper who helped train police in Iraq, was devoted to his daughters. Vishnu Pandit, who came to the United States to build a better life for his family, was proud of his quarter-century working for the U.S. Navy. All were gunned down Monday in one of the worst mass killings ever on a U.S. military installation. As investigators continued Tuesday to sift clues into the motivations of alleged shooter Aaron Alexis, details began to emerge of the women and men authorities say he shot to death.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
From metal detectors to ID checks, visitors entering agency headquarters and large federal facilities in and around the nation's capital are subjected to intense security - so much so that they're often warned to leave extra time to get through the screening. But federal investigators and unions are raising concerns about safety in small field offices scattered across the country, where federal employees at the IRS, Social Security Administration and other agencies are more likely to interact with the public.
NEWS
April 12, 1991
Conrad J. Heimbach, a retired real estate broker, died Tuesday of heart failure at his home on Gibbons Avenue. He was 86.A mass of Christian burial for Mr. Heimbach was being offered today at St. Dominic's Roman Catholic Church, Harford Road and Gibbons Avenue.He retired nearly 20 years ago from C.J. Heimbach Realty and sold the business, which he had operated since 1945.Earlier, he worked for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. and at the Washington Navy Yard.From 1978 until the mid-1980s, he was a member of the Baltimore City Commission on Aging.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 1, 2001
The Mass Transit Administration expanded commuter bus service between Columbia and Washington yesterday with the start-up of another daily bus route. The 915 express bus travels from Harper's Choice along Little Patuxent Parkway and U.S. 29 to Washington, ending at the Washington Navy Yard. Other stops are Clary's Forest, The Mall in Columbia, Hickory Ridge, the Broken Land Park & Ride, Scaggsville, Burtonsville, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Federal Triangle and Capitol Hill. The bus operates from 5:25 a.m. to 7:25 a.m. out of Columbia, and from 2:40 p.m. to 6:05 p.m. out of Washington.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
"Only God and the sea know what happened to the great ship. " — President Woodrow Wilson The last anyone heard of the Cyclops as it steamed in a voyage that began in Bahia, Brazil, on Feb. 22, 1918, en route to Baltimore with 10,000 tons of manganese ore in its bunkers, was in a telegram to the West Indian Steamship Co. in New York City. "Advise charterers USS CYCLOPS arrived Barbadoes Three March for bunkers. Expect to arrive Baltimore Thirteen March. Opnav.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
The deadly shooting at one of the region's largest military facilities Monday reopened the debate about whether officials have done enough to secure the nation's massive portfolio of domestic bases. At least 13 people were killed and several more were wounded, authorities said, when a 34-year-old Texas man and former Navy reservist allegedly opened fire from inside the Washington Navy Yard in one of the most violent such incidents ever on a U.S. military installation. National security analysts say the Pentagon has improved security at its posts following the 2001 terrorist attacks and, more recently, the 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
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