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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
After a quick countdown led by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, 28 strands of LED lights — 16,000 bulbs — lit up the Washington Monument in Mount Vernon on Thursday for the 39th annual lighting ceremony. As the colored strands illuminated, the crowd cheered. Fireworks and green laser lights lit up the night sky while people, bundled in winter coats and hats, watched. "It's a real city event. People come from all parts of the city for this," said Mike Evitts with the Downtown Partnership, which organizes the event with the city and other sponsors, including BGE, which donated the bulbs.
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NEWS
Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
The marble head and body of the George Washington Monument in Baltimore reemerged last week from the scaffolding that has ensconced it for nearly a year, and all exterior renovations are expected to wrap up this month. The $5.5 million restoration project for the 178-foot obelisk in Mount Vernon is ahead of schedule, and entire building should be uncovered in time for the annual Monument Lighting in December, said Cathy Rosenbaum, of the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy. Cranes will arrive this week to remove some of the heavier construction infrastructure.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
William Boulton "Bo" Kelly Jr., the Baltimore architect, preservationist and raconteur, led a study in the late 1970s of the Washington Monument, the first civic monument erected to the nation's first president, and perhaps the most emblematic symbol of the city. Kelly died this month at the age of 84 and didn't see the completion of the latest overhaul of the monument, which is currently closed. Kelly had developed a solid reputation as a preservationist when he helped establish Baltimore Heritage in 1960 and, four years later, the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, serving as its first chairman.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Baltimore Book Festival, once an annual staple in Mount Vernon Square, is smack dab in the touristy Inner Harbor this year, a move that got mostly positive reviews Saturday. Some who took part in the festival in Mount Vernon say they miss the venue and add that it's too early to say which is better. Others thought that featuring the festival at the harbor would give tourists a good impression of the city. "Down here, you have people that are not just coming to the book festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
What's a monument lighting without fish tacos or Polish sausage? On Thursday night, crowds arriving early for the annual lighting of Baltimore's Washington Monument will have plenty of food vendors to keep them company while they wait for things to get rolling. The dramatic monument lighting itself happens at approximately 7:45 p.m., and stage entertainment, which includes choirs and dancing Santas, begins at 6 p.m. But the festivities begin even earlier, at 5 p.m., with food and craft vendors assembling for a holiday village in Mount Vernon Place's west square, the main gathering space for the event.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
From its cavernous subterranean vault, Baltimore's Washington Monument seems every bit its nearly 200 years. Plaster chips and crumbles to the touch. Mortar sealing together thousands of bricks and stones is deteriorating into sand. A mildewy odor fills the air. But historians and architects have a $5 million plan to repair the pillar that was closed to the public three years ago for safety reasons. They expect it to reopen for tours - and a panoramic view of the city from 178 feet above Charles Street - for its bicentennial on Independence Day , 2015.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2010
An unknown driver ran his van through a southeast section of the more-than-150-year-old iron fence surrounding Baltimore's Washington Monument in Mount Vernon early Saturday morning, police said. Police were dispatched just after 2:30 a.m. to Washington Place and East Mount Vernon Place after a 1997 Chrysler van struck the fence, but police spokesman Kevin Brown could not confirm if any citations had been issued. The fence, adorned with a motif of battle axes and stars, surrounds the 178-foot-tall monument designed by architect Robert Mills.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
Baltimore police suspect that alcohol was a factor in the accident in which the driver of a van ran through a section of iron fence surrounding Baltimore's Washington Monument in Mount Vernon early Saturday morning. "It appears as if the driver 'bailed-out' and fled the scene before police arrival," leaving the van said police spokesman Kevin Brown. "He or she is still being sought and the investigation is continuing. " Fifteen feet of the more than 150-year-old iron fence surrounding the historic landmark was damaged when an unknown driver ran a 1997 Chrysler van through a southeast section of the protective metal.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Tracy Marcotte scanned a hand-held metal detector across various spots on the base of the Washington Monument as if she were searching for gold. But it was iron she was after. Specifically, she was searching for iron cramps that hold together stones that make up the monument. Marcotte was part of a team from Pennsylvania-based CVM engineers at the monument Saturday assessing the historic structure in preparation for a restoration to begin next spring. The $3 million restoration is the first project in a plan by the Mount Vernon Place Conservancy to make improvements to Mount Vernon Square, which is made up of the monument and four public squares surrounding it. The conservancy was formed to raise money to improve and manage the site.
NEWS
December 3, 1992
After seven years of repairs, Baltimore's Washingto Monument is reopening -- and not a day too soon. When the 178-foot tower was built between 1815 and 1829, using local Cockeysville marble, it was considered to be an architectural achievement for its time. It was and it is.Baltimore's Washington Monument was the first formal tribute to the nation's first president. When it was built, it stood on a hill in an area known as Howard's Woods, far away from what was then the center of town. The ornate column caused quite an overrun for its day; it cost twice the budgeted $100,000.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Lifelong Baltimore resident Richard Greene has been coming to FlowerMart for nearly 50 years. The 63-year-old retired state employee, who now lives in Tuscany-Canterbury, is one of approximately 40,000 people expected to attend the two-day festival, a Baltimore institution that runs through Saturday in Mount Vernon. "I just like the color of it," said Greene as he eyed the scene. "There's interesting people, crazy getups. It's probably the most quintessentially Baltimore festival.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
We often hear the clanking of the scaffold as the work is being done on the Washington Monument ( "Washington Monument restoration changes atmosphere of Mount Vernon neighborhood," March 24). Like our neighbors, we look forward to its completion. We realize that restoration of the monument is necessary and is being accomplished to high standards of historic preservation. To the contrary, the massive public works being proposed for the Mount Vernon parks is neither necessary nor can it be considered historic preservation.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The scaffolds enshrouding Baltimore's Washington Monument offer passersby a temporary skyline change, but some residents and small-business owners in the Mount Vernon neighborhood worry about the two-year project's impact on their lifestyles and livelihoods. The monument, a central draw to the city's cultural hub, was closed in 2010 after an engineering study conducted by the nonprofit Mount Vernon Place Conservancy deemed it unsafe. The $5 million renovation effort will address structural deficiencies, clean grime off the monument, and include new roofing and electrical system, said Lance Humphries, chair of the conservancy's restoration committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
The Baltimore Book Festival is moving a few blocks south for its fall 2014 edition, to accommodate the renovation of the Washington Monument. This year, more than 200 authors and 100 exhibitors and sellers will pitch their booths at the Inner Harbor Sept. 26-28, according to a spokeswoman for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, which runs the festival. For the past 18 years, the festival has set up shop in Mount Vernon Square. But restoration work on the monument, which began in January, has made navigating the square a challenge even without thousands of additional visitors.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | February 20, 2014
Those of us living in and around D.C. - not just those of us, like me, who actually root for Baltimore's teams over Washington's - should follow the lead of our good neighbors to the north and realize that there can be life after a change of name for a professional football team. Baltimore eventually embraced the Ravens after losing the Colts, and Washington can do the same for the Redskins' replacement. The legends and the mythology associated with the Redskins name of course are powerful: Super Bowl championships under Joe Gibbs; Messrs.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
A small service and a moment of silence under a glowing-red Washington Monument commemorated World AIDS Day in Mount Vernon Sunday evening. The Rev. Joseph Muth of St. Matthew Catholic Church on Loch Raven Boulevard told the roughly two dozen gathered in Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church before the monument lighting that the city's goal is to "get to zero. " "When we were in school, zero was a failure," Muth said. "Now we're in a different school. " He looks forward, he said, to the day when the city can report "zero new infected, zero deaths and zero discrimination of those who are infected" with HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
A retired schools employee may have cracked the mystery of the identity of a man who scrawled his signature in the Washington Monument nearly two centuries ago. After reading an article in Saturday's Baltimore Sun reporting that workers restoring the Mount Vernon landmark had uncovered the signature of a J.W. Hogg dated 1829, Gloria Gibson Day of Timonium did a little sleuthing. Day, who has a passion for genealogy, looked up the name in the Baltimore City directories from the early 1800s.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Who exactly J.W. Hogg was to Baltimore's Washington Monument may be a question left for the ages. Master craftsman who helped build it? Or vandal who defaced it? Hogg's name, written in block letters with a pencil next to the date 1829, was among dozens of 19th-century signatures and drawings discovered this week by a restoration crew using hand tools to delicately remove loose plaster from the monument's subterranean vaults. "They could be craftsmen They could be carpenters.
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