Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWashington Middle School
IN THE NEWS

Washington Middle School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2000
The theme of the play was startling to the outsider. But for many of the Booker T. Washington Middle School pupils performing "Variations on a Theme" yesterday, it was just the urban reality of West Baltimore. A 6-year-old girl is gunned down in a drive-by shooting. Neighbors see it happen, but are too scared to tell police. The child's desperate father hangs a sign on his front door reading, "My neighbors know who killed my child, but won't tell me." It is a far cry from traditional holiday school plays such as "A Christmas Carol" or "The Nutcracker."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
It's a gorgeous September afternoon, and students at the SEED School of Baltimore are spending it just like countless peers across the country - donning their home colors to play a game of football. Classmates drift across campus to watch, sitting beside proud parents. It's a slice of Americana in the heart of Southwest Baltimore. This scene would not be possible without Ed Reed. Reed's foundation donated the money to start a football program at SEED, a public boarding school for at-risk youths on the former campus of Southwestern High.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 31, 2002
Carmen V. Russo, chief executive officer of Baltimore public schools, asked the Maryland Board of Public Works yesterday for $16.5 million in state school construction money to build a new Lexington Terrace school and renovate Booker T. Washington Middle School. The projects are aimed at keeping children longer in neighborhood schools. Both schools would include prekindergarten through eighth grade. The board will make a decision on the request in May. The board awarded the city school system $9.7 million yesterday, most of it to start a citywide technology high school.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Students at two Baltimore schools were tapped for advice about how to keep children off the street and in the classroom this year, as a campaign revs up at City Hall to engage and protect the city's youths. Students at Maritime Industries Academy High School told Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and City Councilman Brandon Scott that they'd like to see more after-school and extracurricular activities, with more variety. Among the list of suggestions were poetry clubs, dance troupes, choir, college trips and career-oriented clubs that can help them build skills.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2000
Across Baltimore yesterday, hundreds of volunteers traded in a lazy holiday at home for name tags, plastic gloves and hair nets to help serve thousands of free Thanksgiving dinners to the city's neediest residents. At Booker T. Washington Middle School in West Baltimore, fourth-year medical student Gopi Menon served up cranberry sauce at a dinner organized by fellow students from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "It's great," said Menon, 33. "It's the best thing I've done this year."
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | December 15, 2007
A Polytechnic Institute biology teacher wants $1,169 for an LCD projector. An eighth-grade special-education teacher at Winston Middle School seeks $1,000 worth of graphing calculators. And a teacher at Booker T. Washington Middle School needs another $261 to have enough money to buy 60 copies of Time for Kids: World Report Edition. "The eighth-grade students of Booker T. Washington Middle School in West Baltimore live in poverty with distractions all around," the teacher wrote in a request for help.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
Back in the 1970s, when Baltimore was a pioneer in matching businesses and schools in long-term partnerships, the city's program was called "Adopt-A-School." Two decades later the program endures under the title "School/Business Partnerships."The change in title acknowledges that both sides benefit from the relationship: The businesses (and other organizations) give books, computers and other materials, as well as hundreds of hours of volunteer time.Faculty, staff and students at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, which has partnerships with Booker T. Washington Middle School and Samuel Coleridge Taylor Elementary, give 2,000 hours of unpaid time annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2012
"Wicked" strikes many a chord, and not just during its catchy songs. It also speaks to issues of prejudice and intolerance. "Outsiders tend to get bullied," said the musical's producer, Marc Platt. "And Elphaba" - aka the Wicked Witch of the West - "is the quintessential outsider. She's bullied onstage. When bullying became part of the national conversation a few years ago, we allowed the show and its characters to be involved. " Cast members have made videos for the "It Gets Better" campaign.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
Anthony Clark hadn't even gotten a plate of food and already he was overcome with emotion, just seeing friends, having a medical student check his blood pressure and knowing hundreds of people had given their time to make sure those needier had a taste of Thanksgiving. "Without them, a lot of people wouldn't have no meal," said the 53-year-old from Glen Burnie, tears rolling down his cheeks. "This is really a beautiful place to come. " Clark meets his adopted holiday family every year at Project Feast, in what's become a tradition organized by University of Maryland School of Medicine students.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 26, 2013
Eight Baltimore City schools were named to the state's "persistently dangerous" list for 2013, after noting high numbers of suspensions for the most violent or harmful offenses. The list, which federal law requires to be reported every year, was released Tuesday and only included schools from the city. A "persistently dangerous" school is defined as one where for three years in a row, a school suspends 2 1/2 percent of its students for more than 10 days for the following offenses: arson or fire, drugs, explosives, firearms or other guns, physical attacks on students and adults, and sexual assaults.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 26, 2013
Eight Baltimore City schools were named to the state's "persistently dangerous" list for 2013, after noting high numbers of suspensions for the most violent or harmful offenses. The list, which federal law requires to be reported every year, was released Tuesday and only included schools from the city. A "persistently dangerous" school is defined as one where for three years in a row, a school suspends 2 1/2 percent of its students for more than 10 days for the following offenses: arson or fire, drugs, explosives, firearms or other guns, physical attacks on students and adults, and sexual assaults.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Baltimore school officials are investigating allegations at a middle school that dozens of students were given passing grades so they could move on to the next grade, even though their teachers had given them failing marks. Grade changes are being investigated at Booker T. Washington Middle School. Several teachers from the school told The Baltimore Sun that dozens of the grades they issued of 50 percent, the lowest possible, were later changed to 90 percent. In some cases, students who never attended class received higher grades than students who showed up and did the work, according to the teachers, who spoke to The Sun on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
Anthony Clark hadn't even gotten a plate of food and already he was overcome with emotion, just seeing friends, having a medical student check his blood pressure and knowing hundreds of people had given their time to make sure those needier had a taste of Thanksgiving. "Without them, a lot of people wouldn't have no meal," said the 53-year-old from Glen Burnie, tears rolling down his cheeks. "This is really a beautiful place to come. " Clark meets his adopted holiday family every year at Project Feast, in what's become a tradition organized by University of Maryland School of Medicine students.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2012
"Wicked" strikes many a chord, and not just during its catchy songs. It also speaks to issues of prejudice and intolerance. "Outsiders tend to get bullied," said the musical's producer, Marc Platt. "And Elphaba" - aka the Wicked Witch of the West - "is the quintessential outsider. She's bullied onstage. When bullying became part of the national conversation a few years ago, we allowed the show and its characters to be involved. " Cast members have made videos for the "It Gets Better" campaign.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
They had already been through the public testimony, the email campaigns and, they thought, the political wrangling. Severna Park High School was on track to receive a nearly $107 million to rebuild one of Anne Arundel County's highest-performing schools — but also one of its worst facilities. But some members of the County Council argued that for the same price, the school system could renovate six elementary schools that they said were just as needy. At what seemed to Severna Park advocates like the last minute, the council voted to delay funding for the project and use the money for the other schools.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | December 15, 2007
A Polytechnic Institute biology teacher wants $1,169 for an LCD projector. An eighth-grade special-education teacher at Winston Middle School seeks $1,000 worth of graphing calculators. And a teacher at Booker T. Washington Middle School needs another $261 to have enough money to buy 60 copies of Time for Kids: World Report Edition. "The eighth-grade students of Booker T. Washington Middle School in West Baltimore live in poverty with distractions all around," the teacher wrote in a request for help.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
At Frankford Intermediate School, parents were eager yesterday to hear more details about how it would be combined with an elementary school. At Mount Washington Elementary School, parents celebrated a dream that seemed to be coming true. And at Booker T. Washington Middle School, the principal was elated. Across Baltimore, parents and educators were mostly enthusiastic about a major reorganization plan announced by city school officials Tuesday that would create 17 elementary-middle schools in a move to keep pupils closer to their homes through eighth grade.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
Two vocal groups representing the clergy and community activists yesterday opposed immediate expansion of Baltimore's "Tesseract" experiment in school privatization, a move supported last week by school Superintendent Walter G. Amprey."
NEWS
September 4, 2004
State's warnings ignore progress of city schools As a teacher in Baltimore's public schools for the past eight years, I share the Maryland State Department of Education's concern for the safety and security of my students. But the method used to determine that my school, Booker T. Washington Middle School, is "dangerous" is deeply flawed ("16 schools warned to reduce violence," Aug. 25) The 25 students who were suspended, and who account for our "dangerous" label, apparently matter more than the more than 600 other students who come to school each day ready to learn.
NEWS
January 31, 2002
Carmen V. Russo, chief executive officer of Baltimore public schools, asked the Maryland Board of Public Works yesterday for $16.5 million in state school construction money to build a new Lexington Terrace school and renovate Booker T. Washington Middle School. The projects are aimed at keeping children longer in neighborhood schools. Both schools would include prekindergarten through eighth grade. The board will make a decision on the request in May. The board awarded the city school system $9.7 million yesterday, most of it to start a citywide technology high school.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.