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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
Betty Hyatt, executive director of Citizens for Washington Hill for the past 20 years, will receive the 1992 Clarence "Du" Burns Award for Community Service during ceremonies at Church Hospital on Tuesday at 7 p.m.The Johns Hopkins Health System is the sponsor of the award, which carries a $1,000 prize.In nominating Mrs. Hyatt, who is known as the "mayor of Washington Hill," representatives of the community group declared that her involvement in community development and maintenance has made the area "a true demonstration project for urban renewal."
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By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was discharged from the University of Maryland Medical Center Sunday, where she had been since experiencing chest pains and shortness of breath Saturday night at the Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Fort McHenry. Doctors performed what the mayor's aides described as "a series of tests to assess her medical condition" before releasing her. She spent less than 24 hours at the hospital and has cancelled her public appearances for Monday. After her release, Rawlings-Blake said she had pushed herself "a bit too hard" amid the celebrations to mark the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | February 28, 1991
Betty Hyatt has spent 20 years seeing that the decaying housing in her East Baltimore neighborhood of Washington Hill is replaced by new housing for homeowners.About 800 new housing units later, she is just one project away from seeing her job completed.The city Board of Estimates yesterday authorized the Department of Housing and Community Development to apply for a federal Urban Development Action Grant worth slightly more than $1 million to finish the job.The grant would help finance a $4.5 million housing project expected to provide 66 new low- and middle-income housing units around the 1400 block of E. Baltimore St.More than half of the housing would be two- and three-bedroom condominium units with the rest being single-family townhouses.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Over the years the residents of Washington Hill have brought back to life a neighborhood on the brink of decay to one that is a thriving, attractive place to live. However, in an effort to support and protect our neighborhood's continued progress and growth, we face a stumbling block created by a loophole in the city's zoning law that continues to impede our progress and harm the citizens of Baltimore. I recently endured a grueling six-and-a-half-hour wait to file a protest against the renewal of a non-conforming Class A establishment's liquor license in our neighborhood.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2008
Tucked between Orleans Street, Central Avenue, Lombard Street and Washington Street, the neighborhood of Washington Hill began as a shipping center in the mid-1700s, later transforming into a mostly residential neighborhood during the mid-1800s. Named for the former Washington Medical College, the site of Edgar Allan Poe's death, the neighborhood banded together during the 1970s to fight urban decay, saving many of its historic buildings. The city's successful "shopsteading" program preserved many of the neighborhood's storefront buildings.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 30, 1994
For reminders of how she has spent much of her 68 years, Betty Hyatt needs only to look out the front window of her first-floor co-op in the 1700 block of E. Baltimore St.Out there are the streets of Washington Hill, where the daughter of Russian immigrants played during the Depression, where the single mother raised five children, where the former church worker dreamed up ways to occupy restless neighborhood teen-agers.She has devoted the past two decades to rebuilding those streets, to shaping solid rows of meticulous, red brick homes, some with marble steps and wrought iron railings, with doorway trim and cornices painted blue and green.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
State officials yesterday suspended excavation of the Metro extension to Johns Hopkins Hospital because the tunneling may be causing gasoline fumes to leak into homes and businesses.Since late January, the city Health Department has been fielding complaints about gasoline fumes in the basements in a six-block area around East Baltimore Street and Broadway in Washington Hill.That's only two blocks south of where workers are excavating the two new Metro tunnels 40 to 60 feet underground. The tunnels currently stretch about 1,000 feet from Johns Hopkins Hospital to Bond and East Baltimore streets.
BUSINESS
By Liz Steinberg and Liz Steinberg,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2002
Washington Hill today is the Washington Hill of Betty Hyatt's youth, but in better condition. "It was a multiethnic community" of lower- and middle-income residents, she said. "It was a mix, but mainly it was just working-class people, a lot of blue-collar, white-collar, but not the executives," said Hyatt, 76, who was born in the 1700 block of E. Fayette St., where she still lives. While the Southeast Baltimore community may be in better repair now than in the beginning of the last century, it wasn't always that way. Some houses had been turned into apartment buildings and were beginning to show signs of wear even during Hyatt's youth.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 20, 2009
Betty Hyatt, a longtime Southeast Baltimore community activist who had been president and director of the Citizens of Washington Hill Inc., where she spent decades fighting for rehabilitated and new housing for community residents, died Wednesday of cancer at Joseph Richey Hospice. The Washington Hill resident was 83. "Betty Hyatt was a trailblazer and a gifted organizer. Had it not been for Betty, Washington Hill wouldn't be the vibrant, close-knit community it is today. Betty loved her city.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
When federal Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo announced in September that Baltimore would receive another multimillion grant to rebuild an east-side housing project, he did not expect to start a fight. HUD would send $21.3 million to demolish Broadway Homes, 429 low-income units at Broadway and Orleans Street, across the street from Johns Hopkins Hospital. By next year, a Hope VI development would go up there, with about 120 townhouses, about 20 percent of them for sale.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Three men were injured in separate shootings in Baltimore Sunday night, police said. A man was severely injured when he was shot in the head in the 3600 block of Reisterstown Rd. in Park Circle around 10 p.m., police said. Because of the severity of the man's injuries, the homicide unit is investigating the shooting, and anyone with information may call 410-396-2100. Around 5 p.m., a man was shot in the back at the corner of Pratt and Caroline streets, between Baltimore's Washington Hill and Perkins Homes neighborhoods Sunday, police said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
A man was shot in East Baltimore's Washington Hill neighborhood Sunday night, with homicide detectives called to the scene because of the severity of his injuries, police said. Police were called about the shooting, which they believe happened in the 1600 block of East Fairmount Avenue, about 10 p.m. More information about the incident was not immediately available. cwells@baltsun.com twitter.com/cwellssun
NEWS
January 6, 2012
I take exception to those who feel demolishing blight won't create new and better housing opportunities ("Market forces alone can't produce more affordable housing in Baltimore," Dec. 30). In 1980, the city demolished several acres of land in Upper Fells Point's Washington Hill neighborhood to attract development and moderate-income people to the area. The land was attached to a federal UDAG (Urban Development Action Grant) and a city block grant. Through the vision of Jay Brodie, director of the Baltimore Development Corporation, Betty Hyatt, a Washington Hill community activist, the Union Trust Bank and others, I and my partner Tom Henderson developed a community of 109 new homes surrounding a one-acre community park.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
Police have charged an Essex man with pretending to be a police officer and stealing cash and a cellphone from a group of men in Washington Hill last month, court records show. Ioannis Skordalos, 35, of the 300 block of Riverside Drive faces charges of robbery, impersonating an officer and theft, and was being held without bail. There have been a series of police impersonation cases in recent months, including one in Greektown that occurred the day after Skordalos was charged, but he has not been linked to any other incidents.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
The problem: A manhole cover in East Baltimore bangs every time cars drive over it. The back story: City residents endure cacophony as part of their daily routine. The wail of sirens, the clatter of helicopters overhead and the zoom of motorcycles whizzing past are part of the daily chorus in many neighborhoods, including Washington Hill, a few blocks south of Johns Hopkins Hospital in East Baltimore. But Joseph Thomas called about a particularly noisy element — a manhole cover at Baltimore and Wolfe streets that bangs when hit by vehicles.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon has said little about the theft charges leveled against her nearly a year ago. But with her trial under way, the silent void is being filled by backers offering personal and political support. Dixon's family members streamed into the downtown courtroom last week for opening statements and the testimony of the first witnesses. So did members of Maryland Minority Contractors Association Inc., who took time off from running landscaping, demolition and construction firms to watch the proceedings.
BUSINESS
By Rosalia Scalia and Rosalia Scalia,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 1996
Southeast Baltimore's Washington Hill is a 28-block neighborhood with a Greenwich Village feel.The community boasts a variety of architectural styles -- Federal, Queen Anne, Italianate, Second Empire and Victorian -- dating from the 1790s to the present. Some of the community's larger homes feature elaborate mansard, slate roofs, decorative New Orleans-style wrought ironwork, intricate stained glass transoms, wood cornices and limestone or brick embellishments.Other homes, some smaller, are characterized by 2 1/2 stories -- they are known as "eyebrow houses" -- and three-story, all-brick structures with sloped or flat roofs.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
When federal Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo announced in September that Baltimore would receive another multimillion grant to rebuild an east-side housing project, he did not expect to start a fight. HUD would send $21.3 million to demolish Broadway Homes, 429 low-income units at Broadway and Orleans Street, across the street from Johns Hopkins Hospital. By next year, a Hope VI development would go up there, with about 120 townhouses, about 20 percent of them for sale.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon has said little about the theft charges leveled against her nearly a year ago. But with her trial under way, the silent void is being filled by backers offering personal and political support. Dixon's family members streamed into the downtown courtroom last week for opening statements and the testimony of the first witnesses. So did members of Maryland Minority Contractors Association Inc., who took time off from running landscaping, demolition and construction firms to watch the proceedings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 20, 2009
Betty Hyatt, a longtime Southeast Baltimore community activist who had been president and director of the Citizens of Washington Hill Inc., where she spent decades fighting for rehabilitated and new housing for community residents, died Wednesday of cancer at Joseph Richey Hospice. The Washington Hill resident was 83. "Betty Hyatt was a trailblazer and a gifted organizer. Had it not been for Betty, Washington Hill wouldn't be the vibrant, close-knit community it is today. Betty loved her city.
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