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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | July 6, 2009
Teacher Scott Delpo never expected he would have to spend his summer break in the classroom. In fact, he had gone 17 years without having to work summer school. But this summer, Delpo, 39, says he was forced to get a job in large part because of the economy. "Honestly, I've been able to get by without having to work in the summer," said Delpo, who is a physical education teacher at Cradlerock School in Columbia during the school year. He's teaching math to rising second-graders this summer.
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NEWS
April 12, 2009
The time you won your town the race We chaired you through the market-place; Man and boy stood cheering by, And home we brought you shoulder-high. To-day, the road all runners come, Shoulder-high we bring you home, And set you at your threshold down, Townsman of a stiller town. A. E. Housman wrote "To An Athlete Dying Young" to offer some consolation in the tragedy of a promising life cut short. But knowing that Nick Adenhart, the 22-year-old pitcher from Hagerstown killed last week in a hit-and-run accident, will be remembered forever young and vital - as the British poet viewed a champion runner - seems hopelessly insufficient, a foolishly romanticized view of death.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2009
In December 1986, Patricia Schooley and her husband, Dave, were looking to purchase a very old house on 5 to 10 acres somewhere in the Mid-Atlantic region. What they found and settled on in less than 10 days is the oldest dated farmhouse in Washington County. The rambling stone structure sits on 120 acres off the back roads of Hagerstown. On a warm midwinter afternoon, peacocks strut alongside Royal Palm turkeys under the watchful eyes of a dozen barn cats and a guard dog. At the end of a long driveway, Old Forge Farm is set amid several outbuildings, including a stone forge and red barns, that form a compound in a semicircle around the main house.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 20, 2009
Jessica Granek and a group of friends hoped to fit in a ski trip yesterday before their spring semester starts at the University of Maryland this month. As the students headed downhill on snowy westbound Interstate 70 in Western Maryland, they saw an SUV turned sideways on the highway. Cars began to slide out of control, Granek said. Tractor-trailers crashed into the cars. "We're witnessing people just smashing into each other," recalled Granek, 21. "That was probably the most frightening thing, just seeing tractor-trailers out of control."
NEWS
January 19, 2009
David Miller Abercrombie, Jr., 86, of 13107 Blue Ridge Road, Hagerstown MD, passed away, Friday, January 16, 2009, at his home. Born Wednesday, December 13, 1922, in Washington DC, he was the son of the late David Miller Abercrombie, Sr. and the late Katherine Kemp Abercrombie. He was a graduate of Montgomery Blair High School and later graduated from the University of Maryland with a bachelor of Science degree and went on to receive his Master's degree from Frostburg University. He was a veteran of World War II serving in the U.S. Army, where he was awarded the Bronze & Silver Stars.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com and fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 10, 2009
William Devereux Zantzinger, the white Southern Maryland tobacco farmer who became infamous because of a Bob Dylan song about his fatal assault on a black Baltimore barmaid in 1963, has died. Zantzinger, 69, died Saturday and was buried yesterday, according to the Brinsfield-Echols Funeral Home in Charlotte Hall. No cause of death was reported. The Southern Maryland aristocrat was convicted of manslaughter in the death of 51-year-old Hattie Carroll. His crime never escaped memory after Dylan recorded "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll," released in a 1964 album.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 17, 2008
Wicomico County might seem like a sleepy patch of the Eastern Shore, known for its poultry farms and wildfowl-art museum. But it's also home to more than 100 known gang members in the Salisbury area - people from the Crips and Bloods as well as local organizations - with another 700 housed within a nearby correctional facility, said Sheriff Mike Lewis. His office and a Wicomico family outreach program received a combined $219,000 federal grant yesterday to combat the growing problem by developing or continuing anti-gang efforts.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
Volvo AB of Sweden said yesterday that it is cutting production and workers at its Mack Powertrain Division plant in Hagerstown to reduce costs because sales of its trucks and buses have dropped. The Hagerstown plant will reduce production of its transmissions by a third and of its engines by 25 percent, said Ilse Ghysens, a plant spokesman. The changes are effective Jan. 25. The cuts were first reported by the Herald-Mail in Hagerstown. "There is a lower demand due to the economic downturn, and we have to adjust," Ghysens said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | November 22, 2008
Robert A. McKee, a former Maryland delegate and executive director of a Washington County children's program, was sentenced to 37 months in federal prison yesterday for possession of child pornography, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. also ordered McKee to register as a sex offender and said that "a reputation is easier to build than it is to repair." McKee apologized to his family and community, acknowledging that he had let them down and violated their trust.
NEWS
By FROM BALTIMORE SUN STAFF REPORTS | October 29, 2008
Man guilty of teen's death A man facing retrial on murder charges pleaded guilty Monday and was sentenced to eight years in prison, according to the city state's attorney's office. Jerrell Gardner, 24, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and weapons charges in the death of 15-year-old Maurice Gordon, prosecutors said. In September, Gardner's case ended in mistrial. Gordon was fatally shot June 13, 2007. Racist graffiti in pawnshop Racist graffiti was spray-painted inside a Gwynn Oak pawnshop that was burglarized overnight, Baltimore County police said yesterday.
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