Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWashington County
IN THE NEWS

Washington County

NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | November 20, 2012
Mark Twain supposedly quipped, "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated. " For Maryland Republicans, the joke is no laughing matter. Gov. Martin O'Malley and Democrats all but engineered the demise of the Maryland GOP through redistricting at the congressional level. It showed in the trouncing of Republican candidates in the election earlier this month. The contest between 10-term Republican incumbent Roscoe Bartlett and challenger John Delaney in the 6th Congressional District says it all: 58.6 percent for Mr. Delaney and 38.1 for Mr. Bartlett.
Advertisement
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 20, 2012
Recycling is the right thing to do. By now, only the resentful, the slothful and people who want to abolish the Federal Reserve must feel otherwise. We're all supposed to remove junk mail, jugs, cans and bottles from the trash so that the paper, plastics, aluminum and glass from them might be used again. Americans lead the world in per-capita trash, so the more trash we recycle, the less we have to bury in landfills. That's the basic understanding. All but the cranky, the indolent and the tree-hugger-haters are well past acceptance of this idea.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2011
White nose syndrome, a fungus deadly to hibernating bats, has been identified in an abandoned mine complex in Washington County. It is the second place in Maryland where hibernating bats have been found to be infected. "Hibernacula surveys are still underway," said Dan Feller, a biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Affected bats have been found in four of the 10 mines in the Washington County complex, which is considered a single site. "We have adjacent counties in both West Virginia and Pennsylvania that are affected, so we knew we would have additional sites this year," he said.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 7, 2011
What happens if Judge W. Kennedy Boone III blows a .07 after lunch? Does he just return to the bench that day, or is the bailiff authorized to send him home with a designated driver? Does Judge Boone get to resume his duties, or does another judge of the Washington County Circuit Court relieve him of his docket? I realize that a .07 blood-alcohol level is not considered intoxication under Maryland law, but it's pretty close. I raise these questions because Judge Boone, who presides in Hagerstown, has been ordered to take a blood-alcohol test twice a day — once before he goes on the bench in the morning, and again after lunch.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
The Washington County public school district was awarded a five-year $7.35 million federal grant Thursday to give extra pay to principals and teachers who work in five high-need schools and increase student achievement. The school system will be one of the first in the state to institute a program of paying teachers based on performance rather than solely on years of longevity in the system. Superintendent Betty Morgan said the system has already begun paying teachers $5,000 extra for working an extended day at high-need schools where at least 50 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2010
Two well-paying blue-collar employers in Washington County are shuttering their businesses, adding to the woes of this Western Maryland county that already has a jobless rate among the highest in the state. The soaring unemployment rate is a painful step back for a county that has tried in recent years to diversify its economy and attract new, high-technology businesses to the area. Known as "Hub City," Hagerstown has been at the center of a regional economy for years, with its highway connections and rail lines offering trucking and distribution companies easy access.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Kenneth N. Weaver, who for nearly 30 years headed the Maryland Geological Survey, which named its Baltimore headquarters for him, died July 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Jacksonville resident was 83. Dr. Weaver, the son of Reformed Mennonite farmers, was born and raised in Lancaster County, Pa. After graduating from East Lampeter High School in 1945, he joined the merchant marine and served aboard ships as a radio operator in the South Pacific in the fading days of World War II. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster.
NEWS
February 11, 2010
Washington County School Superintendent Betty Morgan was named national superintendent of the year by the American Association of School Administrators at a conference in Phoenix, Ariz., on Thursday night. Maryland's superintendent of the year, Morgan was chosen as one of four finalists last fall from around the country. She went through lengthy interviews in Washington, D.C., in January before being chosen the winner. The announcement was made as the four finalists stood on a stage in front of 2,500 colleagues from around the nation.
NEWS
December 13, 2009
Maryland State Police say a Washington County mother and her son have been indicted on murder-for-hire charges. State police say the indictments were issued by a Washington County grand jury against 67-year-old Grace Marie Fink and her 39-year-old son, Clarence F. Meyers, both of Hancock. Police say that Meyers was conspiring with Fink to murder his former girlfriend, who is the mother of two girls he was convicted of killing. Meyers is in prison following his August conviction for those deaths in a February fire.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
When Ken Burns' latest documentary series, "The National Parks: America's Best Idea," airs on Maryland Public Television this month, viewers will see awe-inspiring images of such natural wonders as Yellowstone's Old Faithful, Yosemite's Half Dome and the Grand Canyon. No doubt, some will decide then and there to check out a national park during their next vacation. But Maryland has its own share of scenic vistas, as the folks at MPT and the state's Department of Natural Resources are quick to point out. To drive that point home, five state parks will play host over the next two weeks to a preview screening of scenes from Burns' latest creation, as well as snippets from an MPT production devoted to Maryland's own natural wonders.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.