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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
CASCADE - The former Fort Ritchie Army post in Washington County will be retooled into something new - what, though, isn't clear - by a Columbia developer of suburban offices filled with federal government agencies and their contractors. PenMar Development Corp., the redevelopment authority for the post, signed a sales agreement with Corporate Office Properties Trust yesterday, though both sides have 90 days to reconsider. Corporate Office Properties would not publicly reveal its plans for the site, about 600 acres in the Western Maryland mountaintop community of Cascade.
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NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
BOONSBORO-- --This is it," the hand-painted sign declares, with an arrow directing passing vehicles to turn off the two-lane country road just past a ripening cornfield. Making that turn transports visitors into Maryland's past, ancient and recent. "This" is Crystal Grottoes, the state's only public cave, tucked into a rocky hill alongside South Mountain Creek just outside Boonsboro in Washington County. Here, for no more than a sawbuck, the curious can briefly escape the summer's heat by venturing underground, where it's a naturally cool 54.6 degrees Fahrenheit.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2002
HAGERSTOWN - AB Volvo's decision this week to assemble its next-generation diesel truck engines at its Mack Truck Inc. plant here gives new life to a large factory that has been a vital part of the region's economy for four decades. "This means that we will be building engines here well beyond 2010," said Roger W. Johnston, vice president and general manager of the Mack plant, Washington County's sixth-largest employer. Had the plant - which last year assembled 30,000 truck engines and nearly 6,000 transmissions and is large enough to house three football fields - not gotten the work, Johnston said, "this location would have been phased out over time.
NEWS
By JOANNA DAEMMRICH and JOANNA DAEMMRICH,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT -- Janis Churchey sat at her high school desk, tired and queasy and unable to focus on her teacher. She leaned forward, her expression solemn, to whisper a secret to her girlfriend. She was pregnant. Kelly Taylor, 15 and feeling alone with her own deep worries, was surprised. She was also suddenly relieved. "I might be, too," she confided. At that moment in February 2005, both girls recently recalled, they were in a 10th-grade Life Skills class learning about the disadvantages of having children too young.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
Maryland is locked in a competition with three neighboring states to land a Staples Inc. distribution hub that could create as many as 700 jobs.The Framingham, Mass.-based office-supply superstore, which will spend a projected $50 million to develop its warehouse operation, has narrowed its search to a site in Hagerstown and locations in Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia."We're looking for a distribution facility as a result of the company's growth," said Kim Shea, a Staples spokeswoman.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2000
HAGERSTOWN -- The designated smoking area at the Washington County Health Department is not much to write home about -- a patch of sidewalk, a picnic table, a sturdy ashtray. It isn't anywhere near as nice, for example, as the smoking area at the hospital on the adjoining property, where smokers huddle in the relative warmth and dryness of a brick alcove. The smokers at the health department can see the alcove from where they stand, on this bright, cold winter's day, with no brick wall to screen the bitter wind.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | March 9, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- His mother says she sent him to this Western Maryland town as a teenager to escape the drugs and violence of their Bronx neighborhood. Instead, this is where he cut his teeth as a criminal. Now 28 years old, Steve Lamont Willock has lived all but six months of his adult life behind bars. His home for the past four years, the Western Correctional Institution in Cumberland, is even farther from Baltimore - a place in which he might never have set foot. Yet authorities say they believe Willock commanded one of Baltimore's largest and most violent gangs, a set of the Bloods called Tree Top Piru.
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Aubrey Franklin Haynes, Sr., M.D., J.D., F.A.C.S., 85, of 1017 Oak Hill Ave., Hagerstown, Maryland died March 19, 2007 at Washington County Hospital. Born June 19, 1921, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee he was the son of the late Aubrey and Bertha Haynes. He attended Middle Tennessee State University and Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., and pre-med at Johns Hopkins University; he graduated from George Washington University Medical School in 1949. He served his internship and general surgical residency at Marine Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Rose Madison, who has lived in the same place for 41 years, must start over soon at age 64. The land is being pulled from underneath her house. It is an increasingly common story in Maryland, where mobile-home parks are being converted to more immediately profitable developments, from stores to upscale subdivisions. Manufactured housing is very often the most affordable way to live in this expensive state, but there are fewer and fewer places to put it. Rising land values encourage different uses.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
An evening of tubing on the Potomac River ended in death for two young men in Western Maryland yesterday when a commuter train struck the pair as they tried to cross tracks near the river in Sandy Hook in Washington County.Michael Caputo, 21, and Philip Bricken, 20, both of north Potomac, were declared dead at the scene. None of the train's passengers was hurt.The men, were struck by a westbound MARC train en route from Washington to Martinsburg, W. Va.State police said the victims climbed ashore after riding the river and were trying to join two friends on the other side of the tracks shortly before 7 p.m.1st Sgt. Laura Lu Herman said the men, wearing swimsuits, were holding their inner tubes when they were struck.
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