Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWashington County
IN THE NEWS

Washington County

NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
HAGERSTOWN -- Gov. Parris N. Glendening sat as a jury of one yesterday as Washington County officials and the Hagerstown city government pleaded their cases in a dispute over the location of a new state university campus.Glendening came to hear their arguments and to see for himself two proposed sites for the long-sought Washington County campus of the University System of Maryland -- one along Interstate 70 and another in downtown Hagerstown. As the official who proposes the state budget, the ultimate choice will be his.The governor's decision could send a message about how aggressively he intends to pursue his Smart Growth policy of channeling state construction into downtown areas.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The wait is over for the Sparrows Point girls soccer team. After reaching the state tournament for a 10th time since 1999 and making their fifth title game appearance, the No. 12 Pointers used a gritty performance and two late goals against Smithsburg to score a dramatic 2-1 win in the Class 1A final at UMBC Stadium. It took tying goal from sophomore Lindsea Webb with seven minutes left and then an epic winning goal from freshman Kasie Lambert with 2:16 to play to beat the Leopards from Washington County.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
When the Oakland Mills High School track coach didn't show up in Washington County on Wednesday for the pre-meet coaches conference, meet director Buddy Orndorff waited on him for 15 minutes. When the team didn't show up for the start of the Class 1A South Region meet in Smithsburg, Orndorff called the state police to see if the buses carrying the team had been caught in traffic or had an accident. Officials delayed the start of the meet for nearly two hours, but the Scorpions never arrived.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
In Washington County, good economic news is battling bad. Home Depot Inc. is adding 125 full-time jobs to its distribution center just outside Hagerstown, part of an expansion at the sought-after intersection of Interstates 81 and 70, county officials said yesterday. But last week the county learned that Phoenix Color Corp., one of the largest local employers, soon will close a facility north of Hagerstown that employs 180. Some of the employees will be moved to the company's two other local manufacturing plants, but most will be laid off. "There's a critical mass of sales that are required to operate a plant that size, and we could not achieve it," said Edward Lieberman, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Phoenix, a printing company that is based in the county and employs more than 600 there now. The remaining plants make book covers and other components.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
HAGERSTOWN -- When there's a crash on Interstate 81 or on a rural road, or there's a motorcycle spill at the nearby Hagerstown Speedway, the volunteer ambulance corps in the small mountain town of Clear Spring jumps into action. Until this month, its members would dash to the scene, then speed the patient to the regional trauma center 15 or 20 minutes away in Hagerstown. But in the first 10 days of June, seven patients attended by the staff of the Clear Spring Ambulance Company have been flown by state police helicopter past Hagerstown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore or west to a regional trauma center in Cumberland.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 20, 2012
Recycling is the right thing to do. By now, only the resentful, the slothful and people who want to abolish the Federal Reserve must feel otherwise. We're all supposed to remove junk mail, jugs, cans and bottles from the trash so that the paper, plastics, aluminum and glass from them might be used again. Americans lead the world in per-capita trash, so the more trash we recycle, the less we have to bury in landfills. That's the basic understanding. All but the cranky, the indolent and the tree-hugger-haters are well past acceptance of this idea.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2001
The chief academic officer of Baltimore schools - a key player in reforms that have led to a sharp rise in reading and math test scores - has been named interim superintendent in Washington County. Betty Morgan, who joined the city school system in 1998, will leave her post at the end of the month to oversee the 19,500-student, 46-school district in Western Maryland. Her appointment, announced yesterday, is for one year. "I obviously have very mixed emotions," said Morgan, 57. "I feel highly committed to Baltimore City, and I think people know that.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
In backpacks across Washington County, schoolchildren bring home fliers for soccer teams and the springtime baseball leagues. Last week, kindergartner Emily Mutchler brought home a DNA-testing kit. Parents of the school system's 1,500 kindergarten pupils are being asked to keep a sample of their child's DNA in the freezer. If the child were to go missing, authorities could use the specimen to identify found remains. "We hope nobody actually has to use it because it's bad news if they do," said Brian K. Schulte, executive secretary of the Travelers Protective Association, a fraternal organization based in St. Louis that provided the kits.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2005
HAGERSTOWN -- Barely a decade ago, so few students in this old railroad town signed up for Advanced Placement chemistry at South Hagerstown High School that the class was almost canceled. Today, it's booked solid, one of 18 AP classes filled with new stars such as Beth Davis, the daughter of a Wal-Mart car mechanic, who is determined to be the first in her family to go to college. Last fall, when teachers pushed the reluctant 16-year-old into college-level courses, she nearly cried. She had failed a grade in middle school.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
HAGERSTOWN -- The playing field's in a flood plain. The bathrooms have the appeal of a turnpike rest stop. There isn't much in the way of concessions. Most of the seats have no backs.And here's a particularly charming detail you don't see in most ballparks: An underground shale deposit gives left field a 39-inch rise, a veritable mountain climb for an outfielder chasing a deep fly ball.There's nothing quite like 68-year-old Municipal Stadium, home of the minor-league Hagerstown Suns. For all its shortcomings, the ballpark has achieved an unexpected status: Maryland's only professional sports stadium that predates the Clinton White House.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.