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January 15, 2012
Regarding the four U.S. Marines who desecrated the corpses of Taliban fighters, yes, what they did was vile and reprehensible ("Video of Marines defiling Taliban bodies stirs rage," Jan. 13). War seldom ensures that soldiers will act nobly. Just because they see brutality all around them, soldiers can become ignoble brutes themselves. When my brother was in Vietnam, he told me that some units that had suffered heavy casualties draped the bodies of dead Viet Cong fighters over the barrels of their tanks' guns until the corpses turned green.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
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NEWS
June 13, 2013
Though I hate how big and intrusive our government has become, I don't believe Edward Snowden was aware of the bigger picture when he leaked secret information about the National Security Agency's spying ("Source of NSA leaks named," June 10). He forgot that by leaking the information about the NSA's snooping on Americans, he also informed our enemies of its extent as well. One can't tell the American people about something without telling the rest of the world. Because of that, Mr. Snowden's narrow-mindedness should be considered selfish and traitorous.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 15, 2013
Another Veterans Day has come and gone, celebrating the millions of Americans who served in the so-called War to End All Wars and all the wars since. The day was originally observed as Armistice Day, commemorating the all-quiet on the Western Front in France in November 1918. American troops had been involved there for barely more than a year and a half, and in actual combat in the trenches for only about eight months. The popular song kicking off the U.S. entry boasted, "We'll be over, we're coming over, and we won't come back till it's over, over there.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2004
It was the first wartime Thanksgiving since 1917, and the first after the attack on Pearl Harbor that brought the nation into World War II. On Thanksgiving morning 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke to the nation in a hymn-singing and prayer service that was broadcast on a nationwide radio hookup from the White House. It came at a time when the nation's spirits were starting to be buoyed by the seemingly good news that flowed from the world's fighting fronts. Allied bombers had sunk two Japanese destroyers in the fight for New Guinea and Guadalcanal.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 27, 2003
FIFTY-EIGHT years after Johnny came marching home from war, his old neighborhood honored him over the Memorial Day weekend by displaying his medals, and putting up a plaque, and remembering him as "part John Wayne, part Frank Sinatra, part Errol Flynn and part Dennis the Menace." John Pica Sr. was one of Maryland's most decorated war heroes, and Sunday at overflowing St. Leo's Church in Little Italy, family and friends looked at blown-up newspaper headlines from 60 years ago - "Pica's Daring Feat Saves Buddies" - and heard him praised for a loving nature by the Rev. Michael Salerno, who then burst into the Beatles' "All You Need Is Love" as affectionate remembrance.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to the Sun | September 6, 1991
ADELAIDE,Australia -- Two elderly pensioners have been charged here with the wartime murders of Jews in the Ukraine, the Adelaide Advertiser said in a front page story today.It was only the second time that such wartime charges had been brought in Australia.The Advertiser said the names of the two men had been suppressed, pending their appearances in the Adelaide magistrates court this morning.Yesterday's arrest followed charges brought at the beginning of last year against third pensioner, Ivan Polyukhovich, 75, the first person to be charged in Australia under the 1945 War Crimes Act. Mr. Polyukhovich was shot, though not fatally, while out walking a year ago, and he has yet to stand trial.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
The last time Donald Halverson was on a Liberty ship, he was heading across the Atlantic Ocean, a fresh-faced draftee who would spend the next 21/2 years fighting his way across Germany, France, Italy and North Africa during World War II. A more recent trip, a leisurely six-hour sail down the Chesapeake Bay on the refurbished Liberty ship John W. Brown, a floating museum that has been plying the waters around Baltimore since 1991, proved a lot more...
FEATURES
January 18, 2008
Jan. 18 1943 A wartime ban on the sale of pre-sliced bread in the U.S. - aimed at reducing bakeries' demand for metal replacement parts - went into effect.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
"The Kid in Upper 4" is still one of the most compelling World War II-era images. It ranks at the top with those that asked, "Is This Trip Necessary?" which later became a celebrated wartime quip of battlefield-bound troops. "Zip Your Lip. Save A Ship," "V for Victory," "Rosie the Riveter," "Guard the Supply Lines. Railroad Men. Alert! Head Clear. Eyes Open. Mouth Shut," "Buy War Bonds," or the image of a sinking ship with the caption, "Someone Talked," are other wartime classics. On the home front, they helped define and shape a national patriotic purpose and the morale that was needed to defeat the Axis powers and win the war. In the early war years, the Office of War Information in Washington was headed by noted poet Archibald MacLeish.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Though I hate how big and intrusive our government has become, I don't believe Edward Snowden was aware of the bigger picture when he leaked secret information about the National Security Agency's spying ("Source of NSA leaks named," June 10). He forgot that by leaking the information about the NSA's snooping on Americans, he also informed our enemies of its extent as well. One can't tell the American people about something without telling the rest of the world. Because of that, Mr. Snowden's narrow-mindedness should be considered selfish and traitorous.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Dr. Joseph Taler, a retired Glen Burnie family physician who survived the Holocaust in Poland by not wearing his Star of David armband, taking a Christian surname, and hiding in a village, died Sunday of heart failure at his Annapolis home. He was 89. The only child of an attorney and a pharmacist, Dr. Taler was born and raised in Rozwadow, Poland, where he attended high school. Dr. Taler's father, Abraham Taler, who had been a prominent member of the Polish infantry during the 1919-1920 Polish-Bolshevik conflict, had been recalled to active duty in 1939, was later arrested by the Soviets and was on a train bound for Russia when he escaped during a stop.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
Regarding the four U.S. Marines who desecrated the corpses of Taliban fighters, yes, what they did was vile and reprehensible ("Video of Marines defiling Taliban bodies stirs rage," Jan. 13). War seldom ensures that soldiers will act nobly. Just because they see brutality all around them, soldiers can become ignoble brutes themselves. When my brother was in Vietnam, he told me that some units that had suffered heavy casualties draped the bodies of dead Viet Cong fighters over the barrels of their tanks' guns until the corpses turned green.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
The last time Donald Halverson was on a Liberty ship, he was heading across the Atlantic Ocean, a fresh-faced draftee who would spend the next 21/2 years fighting his way across Germany, France, Italy and North Africa during World War II. A more recent trip, a leisurely six-hour sail down the Chesapeake Bay on the refurbished Liberty ship John W. Brown, a floating museum that has been plying the waters around Baltimore since 1991, proved a lot more...
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg, Jholzberg76@msn.com | June 30, 2011
Wilma Ferrebee was still in high school in 1941 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the nation on the heels of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. "I can still hear his voice saying we're at war," said the 65-year resident of Laurel, who became Wilma Foster when she wed Abe Foster and they moved into town as a young married couple. When World War II started, she was living with her family on their Virginia farm, leading the simple life of a young woman with a Christian upbringing and close family ties.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 4, 2011
Stanislaw Edward Bask Mostwin, a highly decorated World War II Polish freedom fighter whose exploits were worthy of a Hollywood film, died Monday of arrhythmia at his Ruxton home. He was 94. Recalling his years in the underground during World War II, Mr. Mostwin described the experience for the old Sunday Sun Magazine in 1986 as "fantastic, a James Bond life for a young man. " He added, "You are defending your home. There is no hesitation, you just have to go and do it. The alternative is not to be yourself.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1997
BONN, Germany -- Still reeling from charges that it helped prolong World War II through financial dealings with the Third Reich, Switzerland faced newly published accusations yesterday that its wartime arms industry profited from -- and favored -- Hitler's Germany in a weapons trade worth millions of dollars.The disclosure will heap further discredit on a nation that cast itself as a wartime neutral but whose actions are seen increasingly, both by outsiders and some Swiss, as those of a power that collaborated broadly with Nazi Germany under the cloak of that neutrality.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 2000
TOKYO - In a landmark settlement over wartime cruelties, a giant Japanese construction company agreed yesterday to establish a $4.6 million fund for relatives of Chinese laborers forced to work under barbarous conditions near an infamous Japanese mine during World War II. The settlement announced by the Kajima Corp., one of Japan's largest builders, marks the first time a Japanese company has agreed to make reparations to Chinese victims of slave-like working conditions. Japanese authorities forced thousands of people from Korea and China to go to Japan as involuntary labor during the war. Japanese companies in the past have generally said they are not liable for such wartime sufferings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 12, 2011
Edward Jonas, a retired diesel mechanic and World War II Navy veteran, died Jan. 4 of respiratory failure at his Auburn, Calif., home. He was 87. Mr. Jonas was born and raised in Richwood, W.Va., where he attended high school. He enlisted in the Navy in January 1941 and during his wartime career served on three ships — and survived the sinking of two of them. Mr. Jonas was assigned to the powder magazine of the cruiser USS Quincy, which sank in August 1942 during the Battle of Savo Island in the Pacific.
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