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By Los Angeles Times | November 30, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon, building its forces for possible offensive action after Jan. 15, is sending an additional 300 warplanes to the Persian Gulf in a move that will increase the U.S. Air Force fleet in the region by fully a third, defense sources said yesterday.The aerial reinforcement underscores the U.S. intention to make massive use of air power early in any conflict with Iraq in hopes of avoiding a bloody ground war.The latest deployment will boost the number of Air Force planes in the gulf from 900 to 1,200, with some of the additional planes to be stationed at a new Saudi base outside the capital, Riyadh.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Charles William "Smiling Charlie" Fredlund, a retired machinist, died Tuesday of cancer in the Carney home he designed and built with his own hands more than 50 years ago. He was 84. Mr. Fredlund was born and raised in Rutherford Heights, Pa. After graduating from Rutherford Heights High School in 1941, where he had taken the commercial course, Mr. Fredlund planned to be a bookkeeper, secretary or farmer. "With the shortage of work in Pennsylvania at the time, he attended a trade school and taught himself algebra, calculus and trigonometry," said his daughter, Mary Margaret Fredlund of Carney.
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NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Government warplanes attacked French troops in rebel-held northern Ivory Coast yesterday, killing nine of them and an American relief worker, and sparking a dangerous escalation of violence in the West African country. The French, former colonial rulers who are helping enforce a 2003 truce that ended a civil war in Ivory Coast, struck back by attacking government aircraft on the ground. Enraged mobs roamed the streets of Abidjan, the country's main city, searching for French civilians.
NEWS
By LAURA KING AND RANIA ABOUZEID and LAURA KING AND RANIA ABOUZEID,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Israel blockaded Lebanon's coastline, bombarded its international airport and staged hundreds of air raids in a wide-ranging assault yesterday aimed at forcing the Shiite Muslim group Hezbollah to free two captured Israeli soldiers. A defiant Hezbollah retaliated by raining more than 100 Katyusha rockets on northern Israel, killing two people and injuring dozens of others. At least one rocket hit the large coastal city of Haifa, previously out of the projectiles' range, causing no injuries but raising alarm at the prospect of deadly strikes on major Israeli urban centers.
FEATURES
By Myron Beckenstein and Myron Beckenstein,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
FREDERICK -- They will be coming to Frederick this weekend, airplanes from all parts of the country, but mostly from the past.It won't be a ghost fleet, but for the most part authentic planes produced for World War II, lovingly -- and expensively -- preserved or restored during the last 50 years. And still flying.Among the 50 bombers, fighters and trainers expected at the Confederate Air Force's "Wings of Freedom" air show tomorrow and Sunday are one or two B-17s, the workhorse Flying Fortresses; a B-25 Mitchell, the kind of plane Jimmy Doolittle taught to take off from an aircraft carrier and used for his celebrated raid on Tokyo; and some P-51 Mustangs, sleek speedsters that helped turn the battle over Europe.
NEWS
May 10, 1991
Eighty percent of 10 callers to SUNDIAL say allied forces in northern Iraq should issue a warning to the Iraqis about shooting at American warplanes and should try to knock out Iraq's anti-aircraft systems.On the question of a warning, 258 callers out of 308, or 83.7 percent, were in favor, and 50 callers were against it. On the question of attacking anti-aircraft batteries, 258 of 309 callers approved, and 51 did not."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
September 22, 1996
Max Manus, 81, a World War II resistance fighter, died Friday in Oslo, Norway. He was part of Kompani Linge, volunteers trained in England for missions in Norway during the Nazi occupation. He sank German warships and blew up more than 100 German warplanes. He wrote two best-selling books and an autobiography.Vera Brodsky Lawrence, 87, a pianist, editor and historian of American music whose research helped bring the works of Scott Joplin and Louis Moreau Gottschalk to the attention of contemporary performers, died Wednesday at her home in New York City.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 18, 1996
ZHUKOVSKY, Russia - In an unusual economic collaboration uniting former Cold War adversaries, a leading manufacturer of Russian warplanes has joined forces with the American aerospace industry to carry out research for a possible supersonic passenger plane for the 21st century.The Tupolev Design Bureau, best known for designing Russia's huge Blackjack bomber, has turned its TU-144 supersonic plane into a flying laboratory.The experiments are being carried out at the behest of top U.S. aerospace companies, who have also produced their share of warplanes and are now interested in determining whether it is economically feasible to build a new civilian plane that could fly at more than twice the speed of sound.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- With warplanes roaring across a blue sky, tanks rolling down Sunset Boulevard and anti-war activists providing a staunch protest, Los Angeles threw a homecoming parade for troops returning from the Persian Gulf war with the showy, flag-waving flair that only Hollywood could provide.An audience estimated at 500,000 to 1 million lined the 3.2-mile Hollywood parade route yesterday, enthusiastically cheering more than 5,000 troops returned from victory in the war with Iraq. Many warriors still exhibited the stone-faced military discipline in their invasion of Hollywood, while such celebrities as Bob Hope and Roseanne Barr played to the crowd.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- NATO's growing armada of warplanes dominates the skies over Yugoslavia, but only down to a few hundred feet off the ground.Below that altitude, small but deadly Yugoslav helicopter gunships and ground-attack planes are waging a low-level, treetop air war, taking advantage of the hilly, wooded terrain, and NATO's focus on bombing armored forces, to terrorize ethnic Albanians and blast rebel fighters in Kosovo.NATO officials say that effectively grounding Yugoslavia's low fliers would require diverting scores of planes that have already been criticized by some Air Force generals for not launching larger waves of bombing runs and hitting more targets.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
The parent company of AAI Corp., whose unmanned aerial vehicles have emerged as one of the technological darlings of the war in Iraq, saw its shares climb nearly 10 percent yesterday after the company reported a third-quarter profit of $7.4 million. The gain, equivalent to 56 cents a share, compares with a loss of $14 million, or $1.03 a share, in the third quarter last year for United Industrial Corp. The Hunt Valley company has benefited as the Bush administration has emphasized technologies that fit with the Defense Department's efforts to transform the military.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Government warplanes attacked French troops in rebel-held northern Ivory Coast yesterday, killing nine of them and an American relief worker, and sparking a dangerous escalation of violence in the West African country. The French, former colonial rulers who are helping enforce a 2003 truce that ended a civil war in Ivory Coast, struck back by attacking government aircraft on the ground. Enraged mobs roamed the streets of Abidjan, the country's main city, searching for French civilians.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2004
U.S. dollars wooed ally in Iraq coalitionAs the Bush administration scrambled last year to pull together a "coalition of the willing" to wage a war in Iraq, it simultaneously negotiated and financed an unprecedented multibillion-dollar arms deal with Poland - a compact that promises to funnel at least $6 billion in U.S. investments into the former Warsaw Pact nation, which has become one of the United States' primary wartime supporters. President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney have criticized Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry in recent days for suggesting that the administration used financial inducements to assemble its coalition, calling his comments an insult to a country like Poland, which dispatched 2,500 troops to fight alongside Americans in Iraq.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 23, 2003
Lockheed Martin Corp. said yesterday that its first-quarter earnings rose 15 percent because revenue poured in from contracts to develop new warplanes. The Bethesda-based defense contractor said its net income rose to $250 million, or 55 cents a share, from $218 million, or 49 cents, in last year's first quarter. Sales jumped 18 percent to $7.05 billion, Lockheed said. Lockheed's revenue was generated mainly from development of the F/A-22 and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jet programs. The company's warplanes are winning orders and helping Lockheed turn the corner after combined losses of $1.57 billion in 2000 and 2001.
NEWS
April 1, 2003
The battlefield U.S.-led troops battled with Republican Guard units within 50 miles of Baghdad while fighting their way into Hindiyah. Army troops fought with Iraqis for a bridge across the Euphrates River. About three dozen Iraqis were killed and several dozen were captured. Coalition air strikes continue to pound Baghdad, striking communications and command centers and Republican Guard positions. U.S. Army troops killed seven Iraqi women and children at a checkpoint near Najaf when the Iraqis' van refused to stop.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 2003
Gen. Eric K. Shinseki, the Army chief of staff, was questioned by the Pentagon yesterday about a report that he had warned President Bush that the plan to attack Iraq lacked sufficient ground troops, according to military sources. Shinseki, on a flying tour of Army posts in Louisiana and Colorado yesterday, was asked to explain the report on NBC on Friday night, the sources said. He told reporters traveling with him that his conversations with the president are "private and privileged."
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Stephen E. Nordlinger of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this report | January 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- At least 60 of Iraq's best fighter jets have streaked to safety in neighboring Iran, a development that is prompting concern among U.S. military strategists, officials said yesterday.Amid growing signs that the flights are part of President Saddam Hussein's war strategy, Pentagon officials confirmed that more than 80, and possibly more than 100, top-of-the-line Iraqi fighters and transport planes have been granted sanctuary in Iran.Iran, which claims neutrality in the war, has said it will impound the warplanes until the conflict ends.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2002
ANKARA, Turkey - Turkey said yesterday that it would not allow the United States to deploy substantial numbers of ground troops on its territory in the event of a war with Iraq. The new Turkish government, dominated by a party with Islamist roots, said the United States could station warplanes and use Turkish airspace to carry out strikes - but only if the United Nations Security Council adopts a new resolution authorizing force against Iraq. Turkey's stance was outlined last night by Foreign Minister Yasar Yakis after meetings between government leaders and Paul D. Wolfowitz, the U.S. deputy defense secretary.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - The last entrenched force of Taliban fighters, in the southern Afghanistan stronghold of Kandahar, is proving particularly difficult to defeat, preventing the advance of U.S. Marines, defense officials said yesterday. The Taliban forces, some armed with shoulder-fired missiles, are a threat to U.S. aircraft, which are being used to assist Afghan tribes attempting to capture the city, they said. The tribal forces lack sufficient numbers to defeat the dug-in Taliban fighters, thought to number between 3,000 and 17,000.
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